sunaura taylor

The right not to work is the right not to have your value determined by your productivity as a worker, by your employability or salary. Many disabled people, especially severely disabled individuals, do stay home and thus do not work or are held hostage in nursing homes and are denied gainful employment. What I mean by the right not to work is perhaps as much a shift in ideology or consciousness as it is a material shift. It is about our relation not only to labor but the significance of performing that labor, and to the idea that only through the performance of wage labor does the human being actually accrue value themselves.
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You have all seen this right? IF NOT DO YOURSELF A FAVOR

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“What can a body do?” Judith Butler & Sunaura Taylor on a Mission mission in Examined Life (Astra Taylor, 2012), talking queer & disability theory and practice. And shopping.

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Judith Butler and Sunaura Taylor went for a walk and engaged in a terrific conversation about disability as not merely some physical status but largely a social status, and that is also true for so called “able-bodied” persons.

From the film Examined Life (haven’t seen the full thing yet)

Marx and later theorists have shown how capitalist development has privileged certain biological forms of embodiment (for example white able-bodied males). Because of this, it is important when trying to understand the impact of space on bodies (for instance inaccessible buildings and transportation), to consider who is forming (and has formed) spaces and who inhabits them. The extreme inaccessibility and alienation felt by impaired people may not be a natural consequence of their own personal embodiments in the twenty-first century, but instead a complex system of historical, cultural, and geographical discrimination that has evolved inside and alongside capitalism and that we now simply regard (and too frequently dismiss) as disability. Crippled and elderly people have an especially precarious relationship to the machine that is production and consumption. People work hard, they age, their efficiency inevitably lessens and, unless they are fortunate enough to have some savings stashed away, they are too often put in nursing homes where their new value will be as “beds.”
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From Decolonizing Yoga, here’s an amazing conversation between Disability and Animal Rights activist Sunuara Taylor and Gender Theorist/Activist Judith Butler. They provide a great introduction to the social model of disability and suggest what might be at stake for all of us (including currently “able-bodied” people) in disability activism.

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Judith Butler & Sunaura Taylor take a walk in Examined Life.

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San Francisco Is Awesome Part II: Judith Butler & Sunaura Taylor take a walk in Examined Life

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Judith Butler and Sunaura Taylor went for a walk and engaged in a terrific conversation about disability as not merely some physical status but largely a social status, and that is also true for so called “able-bodied” persons.

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Examined Life - Judith Butler & Sunaura Taylor 

Judith Butler and Sunaura Taylor went for a walk and engaged in a terrific conversation about disability as not merely some physical status but largely a social status, and that is also true for so called “able-bodied” persons.

Watch on marxisforbros.tumblr.com

Judith Butler and Sunaura Taylor went for a walk and engaged in a terrific conversation about disability as not merely some physical status but largely a social status, and that is also true for so called “able-bodied” persons.’
This is one of the segments from a documentary I watched last night called ‘Examined Life’, and I while I thought the whole film was really great I especially enjoyed this part so I thought I’d share it here.