sun-god-ra

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Faience Cat
Ancient Egypt - 26th Dynasty

Vivid blue faience cat seated on a base and wearing a collar

Sacred animal to the sun god Ra and Bastet. The earliest Egyptian depiction of the cat took the form of three hieroglyph symbols, each representing seated cats. These formed part of the phrase ‘Lord of the City of Cats’ inscribed on a stone block from El-Lisht that may date as early as the reign of Pepy II, 2278-2184 BC. The Egyptian word for cat was the onomatopoeic term miw. 

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I couldn’t believe my ears at first. That Kaneki was safeThat he’s missing his memories… That he’s caught by the CCG… That he’s being forced to be a ghoul investigator… But most importantly, he’s alive! How wonderful!

for Rea 

The Signs as Egyptian Goddesses/Gods

Aries: Amun- an immensely powerful ram-headed warrior god. At one point he was combined with the sun god Ra to create the even MORE powerful Amun-Ra.

Taurus: Hapi- he was responsible for the yearly flooding of the Nile, which brought important nutrient-rich silt along with it. He’s depicted with a pot-belly and often surrounded by water plants.

Gemini: Thoth- the ibis-headed god of thought and writing.

Cancer: Bes- a dwarf with human and lion features, he protected children, family, and expectant mothers.

Leo: Ra- the sun god himself, of course. He had a hawk head and a headdress with a sun disk on it.

Virgo: Seshat- the goddess of measurement and writing, she wore a dress made of panther skin and a star crown

Libra: Ma’at- the goddess of harmony, truth and justice; she was depicted with a feather in her hair.

Scorpio: Anubis- the jackal-headed god of embalming and the dead.

Sagittarius: Shu- he was the god of air and sunlight, who held up the sky (Nut) to keep it separate from the earth.

Capricorn: Ptah- wrapped in a white cloak and carrying a staff, he was a creator god whose very words came into being. He was the god of craftsmen.

Aquarius: Nun- shown as a man carrying a raft or a piece of bark, he was the “waters of chaos” in Egyptian creation myths.

Pisces: Nut- a goddess who forms the sky, her gown covered in stars. She swallowed the sun god, Ra, every evening and gave birth to him every morning.

The Sun card for my Fairytale Tarot project

As always, if you’re interested in a deck, please sign up here, and I’ll email you when fundraising starts! http://goo.gl/forms/Jr5aHuucrJ

The sun card is about success and birth. It is positivity and confidence after passing through difficult times. It is the peak of radiance, and everything is clear and straightforward.

I chose Ra, the Sun god of Ancient Egypt. Every night he would be swallowed, but every morning he would fight and emerge victorious. I depicted him on his barge, illuminating and making everything feel lush and bright. He is also the god responsible for creating all things, so he’s also a symbol of vitality! See the symbolic bulls tail belt? He’s a stud

Nut Aesthetic

Nut was the Egyptian sky-goddess, whose body created a canopy over the earth. Her body arches across the sky, wearing a dress decorated with stars. She was the sister and wife of Geb, the god of the Earth. She was also the mother of Isis, Osiris, Nepthys and Seth. The ancient Egyptians believed that at the end of the day, Nut swallowed the sun god, Ra, and gave birth to him again the next morning.

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Amun-Ra was a God of many names but commonly referred to as the “King of Gods” in Ancient kemet. It is said that the pharaoh Amun had combined with the God, Ra.  Now I’m not here to give a biography but I will shed light on something very interesting.  Amun –Ra was also called the “God of the sun” and many people around the world were aware of this fact but not everyone. At the Rise of Ancient empires in Africa, formerly known as Ethiopia, there were many Gods in existence. As the Egyptian empire, as it is known today, began to spread and conquer various lands, the generals of the army would call the leaders of the defeated people to a ceremony in which everyone was in attendance. They would tell the leaders of the conquered nation to accept Amun-Ra as their God or suffer the consequences. To accept the offer, all they had to say was “Amun”. Now the validity of this story is often questioned but I’m not surprised.  We must understand that the history of Africa, just like the nation, was conquered and colonized to the point that Europeans tell all the stories. We will never truly know what came out of Africa. Today Europe has claimed to have come up with the word “Amen” and it is often recited at the end of a prayer in various religions.  Amun…Amen…..sounds very similar to me. Whether you believe this story or not is up to you but there is one thing for certain.  Africa has always influenced the world and when you hear Amen, there is a major possibility that you are looking at the legacy of Amun-Ra.  

Written BY @KingKwajo

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mythology meme - two of three locations: duat

In Egyptian mythology, Duat (pronounced “do-aht”) (also Tuat and Tuaut or Akert, Amenthes, Amenti, or Neter-khertet) is the realm of the dead. The Duat is the realm of the god Osiris and the residence of other gods and supernatural beings. It is the region through which the sun god Ra travels from west to east during the night, and where he battled Apep. It also was the place where people’s souls went after death for judgement, though that was not the full extent of the afterlife. Burial chambers formed touching-points between the mundane world and the Duat, and spirits could use tombs to travel back and forth from the Duat.

What we know of the Duat principally derives from funerary texts such as Book of Gates, Book of Caverns, Coffin Texts, Amduat and the Book of the Dead. Each of these documents fulfills a different purpose and gives a different perspective on the Duat, and different texts can be inconsistent with one another. The texts which survive differ in age and origin, and it is likely that there was never a single uniform interpretation of the Duat.

Ancient Egyptian hollow bronze seated cat statue with traces of green patina. Cats were the sacred animal of the Sun God Ra. The earliest Egyptian depiction of the cat took the form of three hieroglyph symbols, each representing seated cats. These formed part of the phrase ‘Lord of the City of Cats’ inscribed on a stone block from El-Lisht that may date as early as the reign of Pepy II, 2278-2184 BC. The Egyptian word for cat was the onomatopoeic term miw. 26th Dynasty.