sun devil stadium

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-KICKOFF COVERAGE’S: HISTORY OF THE 32 IN 32-

-ARIZONA CARDINALS-

ARIZONA CARDINALS STADIUMS:

NORMAL PARK: (1920-1921) (1926-1928)

COMISKEY PARK: (1922- 1925) (1929-1958)

SOLDIER FIELD: (1959 4 games)

METROPOLITAN STADIUM: ( 1959 2 games)

BUSCH STADIUM: 1960-1965

BUSCH MEMORIAL STADIUM: 1966-1987

SUN DEVIL STADIUM: 1988-2005

UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX STADIUM: 2006-Present

This is me staying positive.

As an intern at ASU, I have to do a lot of stuff that the more important people in the office don’t want to do like researching small things or deciding which paper to order. During the day, the other interns are always complaining about how we will never get the recognition we deserve or they don’t want to work because we aren’t getting paid. 

While at times I have the same thoughts, I always keep something that Jimmy Fallon said in mind:

“I was in a bear suit, trying to do comedy. I was thinking, This is lame, this is a waste, they can’t even see my face. Then I looked over at Will Ferrell and he had metal clamps on his nipples and he was getting water thrown on him. And he was just doing it, no complaints. For me, that was a clicking moment. That this could all be a lot easier if you just go with it.” He jacks his eyebrows slightly and smiles. “It’s not: I’ve got to wear a bear suit. It’s: I get to wear a bear suit.”

No. I won’t get a lot of recognition.

Yes, I’ll work 60 hours a week for the rest of the semester and not get paid.

But guess what? I don’t have to go to work. I get to go to work at Sun Devil Stadium everyday. I don’t have to do the grunt work setting up for basketball games and track meets. I get to go behind the scenes at any Arizona State sporting event I want to.

I’m getting to experience things that most people will never have the opportunity to.

I don’t mind.

Arizona Cardinals safety Pat Tillman appears on the May 3, 2004 cover of SI, celebrating after making a tackle for loss against the New Orleans Saints on Dec. 20, 1998 at Sun Devil Stadium in Tempe, Ariz. Inset is a portrait of US Army Cpl. Patrick Tillman taken in June 2003. Tillman, who walked away from the NFL and became an Army Ranger following the terrorist attacks on 9/11, was killed in a “friendly fire” incident while serving with the 2nd Army Ranger Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, in Afghanistan on April 22, 2004. (Gene Lower)

10 YEARS AFTER HIS DEATH, PAT TILLMAN’S LEGACY LIVES ON

Today marks 10 years since the death of Pat Tillman, the former Arizona Cardinals defensive back who walked away from millions to join the military.

Eight months after the September… 11 attacks, Tillman left the Cardinals to join the Army. The 27-year-old was killed by friendly fire in Afghanistan on April 22, 2004.

In their haste to make Tillman a post-9/11 hero, the Army falsely claimed that he was killed “in the line of devastating enemy fire.” But it was later revealed that he was killed by ‘friendly fire.’

It’s still not clear who shot him, except that it was likely by one of three army rangers. And, for the first time, one of those rangers is speaking about what happened that day.

Steven Elliott told ESPN last week he can’t shake the fact that it might be his fault. He’s apologized to the Tillman family, but says saying sorry feels inadequate.

This weekend, thousands of people across the country will walk or run 4.2 miles in the annual Pat’s Run. In Arizona, the race will end at the 42-yard line at Sun Devil Stadium, where Tillman started his football career as No. 42.

The event has helped the Pat Tillman Foundation give back to military veterans and their spouses through educational scholarships.

More than 290 scholars have helped carry on Pat’s legacy in the past decade, according to the Pat Tillman Foundation’s website.

“Somewhere inside, we hear a voice,” Tillman once said. “It leads us in the direction of who we wish to become. But it is up to us whether or not to follow.”

Pat Tillman was a man willing to sacrifice anything for a better cause. And because of that, his legend will live forever.