sun deity

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First Webisode of Tales of Alethrion is out!

Mikkel Mainz will do a YouTube LIVE Q&A in half an hour, Watch the webisode and come and join the LIVE event! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QsRwnOJ2A7Q 

High Fives!

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MYTHOLOGY MEME - [1/?] EGYPTIAN GODS/GODDESSES: BASTET

“My Goddess -Cat, with cold intuitive heart,

I feel your moon-breaths oread on me above.

Let me touch your silver glow circle,

make my mind open for this wonder." 

Ancient Deities; Sól, Old Norse for Sun
Sól is the Norse personification of the Sun, tasked with riding across the sky on her chariot pulled by the horses Alsvid (“all swift”) and Arvak (“early riser”). Her brother Mani rides across the sky in the night as the Moon. Chasing her is the monstrous wolf Skoll, who, it is said, will catch and devour her at Ragnarok. 

I knew him first but I knew her always

Throughout the years he serenaded me in a courtship of strings and woodwinds
He sang to me the story of a naive girl and guided me with melody
–She offered me her hand in synchronous dance

She makes the words on a page come to life in origami figures,
She wrote our love story as a book of watercolor fairytales
And our world as a place of endless magic
–He offered me a ride upon a gallant motorcycle

He is the fire in my veins and the air in my lungs
He is Apollon with his golden light and laughter

She is the stars in my eyes and wonder of the world
She is Selene with her silver softness and beauty

And we loved with a love that was more than love
We loved as the earth loves the sun and the moon

—  A polyamorous witch

Been a long long time since I’ve drawn this boy. Dysis. He’s … something.

Honestly, I have no name for WHAT he is, but I do know that he is something of a sun/lava type deity. He’s also got a really terrible temper and seems to really like anime?? Not sure what to do with him, but maybe he and Taichi can get to know one another, lil culture shock for one of them (They both got lines through the brows so why not). lol, Dysis has no home and never really did. He’s just some weird enigma. 

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@deityproject week 1 Introducing your Deity

Aysdirs, the profanity of its world incorporate, the creature that twists and corrupts and erases at its own wins, against the good nature of fate. She was our beginning and she will be our end.”

Elagabalus: The Transgender Roman Emperor

Reign: 8 June 218 – 11 March 222

Caesar Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus was 14 years old when he became Roman Emperor. He is known to history as Elagabalus because he was from birth the high priest of the androgynous sun deity Elagabal. Elagabalus is recorded as having been one of the most infamous and degenerate figures in Roman history.

Elagabalus married and divorced five women but his most stable relationship seems to have been his chariot driver, a blond slave from Caria name Hierocles, whom he referred to as his husband. He married a man name Zoticus, an athlete from Smyrna, in a pubic ceremony at Rome.

When he was married to Hierocles, Elagabalus would dress like a woman and allow himself to be caught in the act of adultery by his husband, who would then beat him as husbands were then allowed to beat their wives.

Elagabalus would paint his eyes, epilate his hair and wear wigs before prostituting himself in taverns, brothels, and even in the imperial palace: 

“Finally, he set aside a room in the palace and there committed his indecencies, always standing nude at the door of the room, as the harlots do, and shaking the curtain which hung from gold rings, while in a soft and melting voice he solicited the passers-by. There were, of course, men who had been specially instructed to play their part. For, as in other matters, so in this business, too, he had numerous agents who sought out those who could best please him by the size of their penis. He would collect money from his patrons and give himself airs over his gains; he would also dispute with his associates in this shameful occupation, claiming that he had more lovers than they and took in more money.”

He was described as having been “delighted to be called the mistress, the wife, the queen of Hierocles” and was reported to have offered vast sums of money to any physician who could equip him with female genitalia.

One of his palace orgies was the scene of an inadvertent massacre when so many flower petals were showered upon the banquet guests that dozens of people suffocated to death as they reclined on their couches.

He was known to harness teams of naked women to his chariot and whip them as they pulled him around the palace grounds.

On his head, he wore a crown in the shape of a tiara, glittering with gold and precious stones.

He preferred to spend his days in the company of the palace women, singing, dancing and weaving.

The soldiers were revolted at the sight of him. With his face made up more elaborately than a modest woman, he was effeminately dressed up in golden necklaces and soft clothes, dancing for everyone to see.

At the age of 18, in March 222 AD, Rome’s soldiers finally rebelled against their Emperor. After slaughtering his minions and tearing out their vital organs, they then fell upon Elagabalus as he hid cowering in a latrine. After killing him, they dragged his body through the streets by a hook and attempted to stuff it into a sewer. When it proved too big, they threw him into the River Tiber.

▲▲In Late Antiquity a cult of Helios Megistos (“Great Helios”) (Sol Invictus) drew to the image of Helios a number of syncretic elements▲▲


Orphic hymn TO THE SUN [HELIOS]

The Fumigation from Frankinsence and Manna.
Hear golden Titan, whose eternal eye with broad survey, illumines all the sky.
Self-born, unwearied in diffusing light, and to all eyes the mirrour of delight:
Lord of the seasons, with thy fiery car and leaping coursers, beaming light from far:
With thy right hand the source of morning light, and with thy left the father of the night.
Agile and vig'rous, venerable Sun, fiery and bright around the heav'ns you run.
Foe to the wicked, but the good man’s guide, o'er all his steps propitious you preside:
With various founding, golden lyre, ‘tis mine to fill the world with harmony divine.
Father of ages, guide of prosp'rous deeds, the world’s commander, borne by lucid steeds,
Immortal Jove [Zeus], all-searching, bearing light, source of existence, pure and fiery bright
Bearer of fruit, almighty lord of years, agil and warm, whom ev'ry pow'r reveres.
Great eye of Nature and the starry skies, doom’d with immortal flames to set and rise
Dispensing justice, lover of the stream, the world’s great despot, and o'er all supreme.
Faithful defender, and the eye of right, of steeds the ruler, and of life the light:
With founding whip four fiery steeds you guide, when in the car of day you glorious ride.
Propitious on these mystic labours shine, and bless thy suppliants with a life divine.

MASTER POST OF COMPLETE LIST OF EGYPTIAN DIETIES

List of deities

Aker – A god of the earth and the horizon[3]
Ammit – goddess who devoured condemned souls[4]
Amenhotep son of Hapu – A scribe and architect in the court of Amenhotep III, later deified for his wisdom[5]
Am-heh – A dangerous underworld god[5]
Amun – A creator god, patron deity of the city of Thebes, and the preeminent deity in Egypt during the New Kingdom[6]
Amunet – Female counterpart of Amun and a member of the Ogdoad[3]
Anat – A war and fertility goddess, originally from Syria, who entered Egyptian religion in the Middle Kingdom[7]
Anhur – A god of war and hunting[8]
Anti – Falcon god, worshipped in Middle Egypt,[9] who appears in myth as a ferryman for greater gods[10]
Anubis – god of embalming and protector of the dead[11]
Anuket – A goddess of Egypt’s southern frontier regions, particularly the lower cataracts of the Nile[12]
Apedemak – A warlike lion god from Nubia who appears in some Egyptian-built temples in Lower Nubia[13]
Apep – A serpent deity who personified malevolent chaos and was said to fight Ra in the underworld every night[14]
Apis – A live bull worshipped as a god at Memphis and seen as a manifestation of Ptah[15]
Arensnuphis – A Nubian deity who appears in Egyptian temples in Lower Nubia in the Greco-Roman era[16]
Ash – A god of the Libyan Desert and oases west of Egypt[17]
Astarte – A warrior goddess from Syria and Canaan who entered Egyptian religion in the New Kingdom[18]
Aten – Sun disk deity who became the focus of the monolatrous or monotheistic Atenist belief system in the reign of Akhenaten[19]
Atum – A creator god and solar deity, first god of the Ennead[20]
Baal – Sky and storm god from Syria and Canaan, worshipped in Egypt during the New Kingdom[21]
Ba'alat Gebal – A Caananite goddess, patroness of the city of Byblos, adopted into Egyptian religion[22]
Babi – A baboon god characterized by sexuality and aggression[23]
Banebdjedet – A ram god, patron of the city of Mendes[24]
Ba-Pef – A little-known underworld deity[25]
Bast – Goddess represented as a cat or lioness, patroness of the city of Bubastis, linked with fertility and protection from evil[26]
Bat – Cow goddess from early in Egyptian history, eventually absorbed by Hathor[27]
Bennu – A solar and creator deity, depicted as a bird[28]
Bes – Apotropaic god, represented as a dwarf, particularly important in protecting children and women in childbirth[29]
Buchis – A live bull god worshipped in the region around Thebes and a manifestation of Montu[30]
Dedun – A Nubian god, said to provide the Egyptians with incense and other resources that came from Nubia[31]
Geb – An earth god and member of the Ennead[32]
Ha – A god of the Libyan Desert and oases west of Egypt[33]
Hapi – Personification of the Nile flood[33]
Hathor – One of the most important goddesses, linked with the sky, the sun, sexuality and motherhood, music and dance, foreign lands and goods, and the afterlife. One of many forms of the Eye of Ra.[34]
Hatmehit – Fish goddess worshipped at Mendes[35]
Hedetet – A minor scorpion goddess[36]
Heh – Personification of infinity and a member of the Ogdoad[35]
Heka – Personification of magic[37]
Heket – Frog goddess said to protect women in childbirth[38]
Heryshaf – Ram god worshipped at Herakleopolis Magna[39]
Hesat – A maternal cow goddess[40]
Horus – A major god, usually shown as a falcon or as a human child, linked with the sky, the sun, kingship, protection, and healing. Often said to be the son of Osiris and Isis.[41]
Hu – Personification of the authority of the spoken word[42]
Iah – A moon god[43]
Iat – A goddess of milk and nursing[44]
Ihy – A child deity born to Horus and Hathor, representing the music and joy produced by the sistrum[45]
Imentet – An afterlife goddess closely linked with Isis and Hathor[46]
Imhotep – Architect and vizier to Djoser, eventually deified as a healer god[47]
Ishtar – The East Semitic version of Astarte, occasionally mentioned in Egyptian texts[48]
Isis – Wife of Osiris and mother of Horus, linked with funerary rites, motherhood, protection, and magic. She became a major deity in Greek and Roman religion.[49]
Iusaaset – A female counterpart to Atum[50]
Khepri – A solar creator god, often treated as the morning form of Ra and represented by a scarab beetle[51]
Kherty – A netherworld god, usually depicted as a ram[52]
Khnum – A ram god, the patron deity of Elephantine, who was said to control the Nile flood and give life to gods and humans[53]
Khonsu – A moon god, son of Amun and Mut[54]
Maahes – A lion god, son of Bastet[55]
Maat – goddess who personified truth, justice, and order[56]
Mafdet – A predatory goddess said to destroy dangerous creatures[57]
Mandulis – A Lower Nubian solar deity who appeared in some Egyptian temples[58]
Mehit – A lioness goddess, consort of Anhur[59]
Menhit – A lioness goddess[59]
Mehen – A serpent god who protects the barque of Ra as it travels through the underworld[60]
Mehet-Weret – A celestial cow goddess[60]
Meretseger – A cobra goddess who oversaw the Theban Necropolis[61]
Meskhenet – A goddess who presided over childbirth[62]
Min – A god of virility, as well as the cities of Akhmim and Qift and the Eastern Desert beyond them[63]
Mnevis – A live bull god worshipped at Heliopolis as a manifestation of Ra[64]
Montu – A god of war and the sun, worshipped at Thebes[65]
Mut – Consort of Amun, worshipped at Thebes[66]
Nebethetepet – A female counterpart to Atum[67]
Nefertum – god of the lotus blossom from which the sun god rose at the beginning of time. Son of Ptah and Sekhmet.[67]
Nehebu-Kau – A protective serpent god[68]
Nehmetawy – A minor goddess, the consort of Nehebu-Kau or Thoth[69]
Neith – A creator and hunter goddess, patron of the city of Sais in Lower Egypt[70]
Nekhbet – A vulture goddess, the tutelary deity of Upper Egypt[71]
Neper – A god of grain[72]
Nephthys – A member of the Ennead, the consort of Set, who mourned Osiris alongside Isis[73]
Nu – Personification of the formless, watery disorder from which the world emerged at creation and a member of the Ogdoad[74]
Nut – A sky goddess, a member of the Ennead[75]
Osiris – god of death and resurrection who rules the underworld and enlivens vegetation, the sun god, and deceased souls[76]
Pakhet – A lioness goddess mainly worshipped in the area around Beni Hasan[77]
Ptah – A creator deity and god of craftsmen, the patron god of Memphis[78]
Qetesh – A goddess of sexuality and sacred ecstasy from Syria and Canaan, adopted into Egyptian religion in the New Kingdom[79]
Ra – the foremost Egyptian sun god, involved in creation and the afterlife. Mythological ruler of the gods, father of every Egyptian king, and the patron god of Heliopolis.[80]
Raet-Tawy – A female counterpart to Ra[81]
Renenutet – An agricultural goddess[82]
Reshep – A Syrian war god adopted into Egyptian religion in the New Kingdom[83]
Renpet – goddess who personified the year[81]
Satet – A goddess of Egypt’s southern frontier regions[84]
Seker – god of the Memphite Necropolis and of the afterlife in general[85]
Sekhmet – A lioness goddess, both destructive and violent and capable of warding off disease. The consort of Ptah and one of many forms of the Eye of Ra.[86]
Serapis – A Greco-Egyptian god from the Ptolemaic Period who fused traits of Osiris and Apis with those of several Greek gods. Husband of Isis who, like her, was adopted into Greek and Roman religion outside Egypt.[87]
Serket – A scorpion goddess, invoked for healing and protection[88]
Seshat – goddess of writing and record-keeping, depicted as a scribe[89]
Set – An ambivalent god, characterized by violence, chaos, and strength, connected with the desert. Mythological murderer of Osiris and enemy of Horus, but also a supporter of the king.[90]
Shai – Personification of fate[91]
Shed – A god believed to save people from danger and misfortune[92]
Shesmetet – A lioness goddess[92]
Shezmu – A god of wine and oil presses who also slaughters condemned souls[93]
Shu – embodiment of wind or air, a member of the Ennead[94]
Sia – Personification of perception[95]
Sobek – Crocodile god, worshipped in the Faiyum and at Kom Ombo[96]
Sopdu – A god of the sky and of Egypt’s eastern border regions[97]
Sopdet – Deification of the star Sirius[98]
Ta-Bitjet – A minor scorpion goddess[99]
Tatenen – Personification of the first mound of earth to emerge from chaos in ancient Egyptian creation myths[99]
Taweret – Hippopotamus goddess, protector of women in childbirth[100]
Tefnut – Goddess of moisture and a member of the Ennead[101]
Thoth – A moon god, and a god of writing and scribes, and patron deity of Hermopolis[102]
Tutu – An apotropaic god from the Greco-Roman era[103]
Unut – A goddess represented as a snake or a hare, worshipped in the region of Hermopolis[104]
Wadjet – A cobra goddess, the tutelary deity of Lower Egypt[105]
Wadj-wer – Personification of the Mediterranean sea or lakes of the Nile Delta[106]
Weneg – A son of Ra who maintains cosmic order[106]
Wepwawet – A jackal god, the patron deity of Asyut, connected with warfare and the afterlife[107]
Werethekau – A goddess who protected the king[108]
Wosret – A minor goddess of Thebes[109]
Yam – A Syrian god of the sea who appears in some Egyptian texts[110]