sugar link

French Toast Sausage Roll-Ups

Ingredients & Measurements:

  • 8-10 White or Wheat Sandwich Bread
  • 8-10 Sausage Links
  • 3 Eggs
  • ½ cup Milk
  • 3 tbsp Sugar
  • ½ tsp Cinnamon
  • 1 tsp Vanilla
  • 1 tsp Flour

Instructions:

Slice off the crusts on the bread. Use a rolling on to flatten each piece of bread. Place a sausage link on the front edge of the bread. Roll up tightly, like a taquito. Preheat skillet over medium heat, make sure to grease well with butter. Add eggs, milk, sugar, cinnamon, vanilla, and flour together in shallow dish. Dip sausage roll ups into the mixture, rolling gently coat all sides, and place in skillet. Cook for a few minutes, turning gently as you go until they are golden brown. Serve with syrup. Enjoy!

Over the past few years, Rebecca Sugar has learned to steer a very large spaceship. Five seasons in, Steven Universe, her Cartoon Network show – the channel’s first created by a woman – is enormously popular with both kids and their parents, attracting a vast, fierce fandom. (It’s frequently at or near the top of the various rankings on Tumblr’s Fandometrics page, and has a large following all across social media platforms.)

The series is consistently lauded for its emotional intelligence, its musical numbers (including songs sung by Estelle and Patti LuPone, who Sugar wooed with roses), its nuanced character development, and especially its insistent queerness – one major character is the literal and metaphorical embodiment of a lesbian relationship, and almost no one in its central family is related by blood.

With her mop of black hair, indefatigable smile and seemingly boundless energy (she’ll turn 30 in July), it’s not hard to see Sugar in her creation. But series protagonist Steven – a relentlessly kind, goofy boy at the center of a millennia-old galactic war between the Earthbound Crystal Gems (Garnet, Amethyst and Pearl) and the parasitic Gem Homeworld – has a lot less going on in his life than his creator.

Steven Universe isn’t just a TV show: It’s a sprawling, many-tentacled property that includes comics, an upcoming console video game, a just-released soundtrack album, a New York Times best-selling children’s book and merchandise recreating most of Steven’s clothes. Most of these run through Sugar personally in some capacity – she wrote The Answer (the children’s book), made editing passes on the companion volume Steven Universe’s Guide to the Crystal Gems, oversaw the tracklisting and remixing for the album, and contributed dialogue and artistic guidance to the game, Save the Light.

The scope of her job both excites Sugar and, occasionally, pains her. “When I don’t have time to be really involved, it’s definitely strange to see something come into existence and know that I…” She cuts herself off. “But it’s hard to stay away.” Letting anything go is difficult for Sugar, whose life and relationships, in a sense, are the show.

Steven is something of a tribute to Rebecca’s brother Steven Sugar, a background designer on the show. The show’s exploration of romantic relationships (particularly in the character of Garnet, the living embodiment of a romantic relationship) is informed by her own with long-term partner Ian Jones-Quartey, a former executive producer on Steven Universe and the creator and showrunner for upcoming Cartoon Network series OK K.O!. “My time with them is trapped inside the show,” Sugar says. “That’s what makes it special.”

Read more at Rolling Stone

WLW TV Recommendations for Everyone Sick of the BYG Trope

So, I know that most of us are tired of the representation we get and of wlw characters getting constantly killed off. I wanted to write a post about all the shows that don’t fall into this trap - I have included three shows that do at some point kill off a wlw, however this is either because - in the case of the first two - almost all of the main characters are wlw and the deaths aren’t particularly offensive, or - in the last one - the death is irrelevant, doesn’t have to be watched + and doesn’t have to affect the story (…I’ll explain later, it’ll be in my second post). This post will focus on wlw-centric shows, and then I’ll be making future posts on shows with one or more main wlw character, and then shows with side wlw characters.

WLW-Centric Shows

Shows which feature majority wlw characters and/or explore primarily wlw themes.

Banana

Drama. Banana is the counterpart to C4′s Cucumber (a drama about a group of gay men living in Manchester) - it consists of 8 25-minute episodes, each focusing on a different character, all of whom are LGBT+. Three focus on mlm, four on wlw, and one on a straight trans woman. All of them vary in tone and offer very different topics. Most of the characters also appear in Cucumber as side characters or guest stars, and vice versa. How good is the representation? Much more racially diverse than most of the shows on this list (unfortunately) with around half of the episodes focusing at least partly on POC. Some sensitive portrayals of living with mental illness and taking care of someone with a disability. Could use more bi/pan characters - as far as I know none of the primary characters are bi/pan, though there is a main bi guy in Cucumber who appears as a side character in Banana. Status: Completed.  Where can I watch it? If you live in the UK, it’s available on 4OD. It’s also pretty easy to find links online.

Faking It

Comedy. Faking It starts off with a potentially offensive premise - in a hilariously liberal high school in Texas, two best friends are mistaken for a couple and decide to keep up the facade once they realise it’ll gain them popularity. However, by the end of the pilot, one of the girls has realised she has feelings for her best friend and from there on out the show becomes about her getting to grips with her identity, and the relationship between the two girls. The first season is the best, and unfortunately after that its original premise starts to get somewhat watered down as it tries to be an ensemble show - however that ensemble features a gay guy and an intersex girl, and side characters include a number of gay and bi girls, gay guys, a trans guy, and a bi guy (there’s also an asexual who pops up for about two seconds). Both Karma and Amy, our love interests slash best friends, are confirmed by the writers to be wlw, but unfortunately the show was cancelled before one of them could come to terms with her sexuality. How good is the representation? There’s a lot of representation but it’s not always handled in the best way! A number of characters express overt biphobia and aren’t always called out on it - bizarrely, considering Karma + Amy are both portrayed to be bi/pan. Mostly white cast. Status: Completed. Where can I watch it? Super easy to find links online!

Lip Service

Drama. Lip Service follows a group of WLW living in Scotland. It’s basically the less offensive, British version of The L Word. I don’t see it mentioned much and yet it’s one of the gayest shows out there so you should definitely give it a go! There is a character death in S2 and it’s unfortunately when the character is feeling happy about a love interest, but I’m giving it a pass since literally all of the main characters are wlw. How good is the representation? As you can see, the show is overwhelmingly white. There is also very little bi rep - all of the main WLW are lesbians apart from one whom I’m not sure whether is gay or bi, and only one bi love interest. The characters are also all cis. Status: Completed.  Where can I watch it? Easy to find links online.

South of Nowhere

Drama. South of Nowhere follows a relatively conservative family who move to LA, but its primary narrative is the romantic relationship between their teenage daughter Spencer, and the new girl she meets, Ashley. It’s soapy and often over-the-top, but the relationship between the two girls is well-done. It’s also one of the only shows where the WLW couple get a very overtly happy ending. How good is the representation? Throughout the first two seasons there’s a well-done narrative about police brutality against black people and the alienation of being a black kid in a white family (Spencer’s brother, Clay, is adopted) but they unfortunately end that narrative pretty badly. The portrayal of Ashley’s sexuality isn’t great in that, after seeing all 3 seasons, she seems to be pretty clearly bisexual and yet very often refers to herself as gay - however, this is a mid-00s show so I’ll forgive them. Status: Completed.  Where can I watch it? Easy to find links online.

Sugar Rush

Comedy. Sugar Rush takes place in Brighton and follows 15-year-old ‘queer virgin’ Kim, as she navigates coming to terms with her lesbian identity, her infatuation with her straight best friend, and her eccentric family. It’s super fun and light and basically the diary-style teen comedy young wlw need (you’ll enjoy it if you’re older, too!) How good is the representation? The cast is largely white (sensing a theme here), and Kim definitely displays some biphobia (I can’t remember whether she gets over that or not) as well as making some immoral decisions (afaik these are portrayed as such though). Overall it’s pretty good for something released in 2004. Status: Completed. Where can I watch it? It can be a tricky one to find but I’ve personally had good luck with DailyMotion. DVDs are available.

The L Word

Drama. The most classic of all WLW shows, The L Word follows a group of WLW living in LA and generally having a lot of sex and getting into a lot of drama. It has a lot of issues but if you still feel able to watch is a lot of fun and super addictive. How good is the representation? The first 2 seasons are great in terms of bi rep, but bizarrely and unfortunately the show becomes super biphobic as it goes on. It can also unfortunately be very transphobic (this will be expanded upon in the triggers section). Again, very white. Two wlw characters are killed off but I’m giving it a pass because everyone’s a wlw. Status: Completed.  Where can I watch it? Should be easy to find links anywhere online! DVDs are available.

Transparent

Dramedy. Transparent follows a Jewish LA family after the father comes out as a trans woman - three of the five main characters (pictured above) are WLW, and the focus of the show is on how all of these characters relate to their own genders and sexualities and how that affects their relationships with another. It’s a beautiful, poignant slice-of-life show. How good is the representation? The main trans woman is played by a cis man, which is a con, but all of the trans female side characters are played by trans women. The bisexual wlw never says the word bisexual, and I personally feel they could’ve gone into more depth regarding one character’s realisation of her sexual identity - however, this is really a cut above the rest. Frustratingly, also mostly white. There’s a potentially very triggering scene regarding a trans woman character - as a cis woman I’m not sure I can say whether it’s offensive or not, but I’ll explain more in the triggers section. Status: Still Airing. Where can I watch it? On Amazon Prime, otherwise, it’s easy to find links online.

You Me Her

Comedy. You Me Her explores the polyamorous relationship between two bi/pan women and one straight man. I’ve yet to see it but I hear that it’s well done and a sensitive portrayal of bi/pansexuality and polyamory. Status: Still Airing. Where can I watch it? Easy to find links online.

Please let me know if you need help finding the shows, and if you watch them and enjoy them! Trigger warnings are below the read more (will contain spoilers).

Keep reading

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The gameplay looks similar to ATL but I’m really into the idea of combo moves between characters. Plus everything looks great. I can’t wait to play!

The Tinder Tutorials

I get a lot of asks about Tinder and I thought it would be worthwhile to collect my “best of” posts right here.  Each of the topics I list has the relevant links immediately following.  These tutorials will have you swiping and matching in no time!


Is the guy that just matched you more vanilla than sugar daddy?  These links help you figure out which he is and include a sample text/message. It clearly communicates that you are a sugar baby looking for a sugar daddy, not a vanilla FWB!

I met a POT on Tinder a few weeks ago, I stopped talking to him because he seemed more “vanilla” than SD. But he’s reached out to me recently, but I haven’t responded. He’s a really nice guy, but I don’t want to waste my time. Do you think I should reply? If so, what should I say to steer him towards SD?

 I have a match on tinder with an 48y man and I think he’s a sd. I haven’t told him yet I’m a sb but I think he suspects that. He just asked me what I’m looking for but I dont know how to make it clear. Can you please help me?

 So i met this nice gentlemen on Tinder and we have texted and really hit it off but since I took the tinder approach I am not sure if he understands that I am a sugar baby and need certain things. How do i SUBTLY let him know what I’m looking for? I could do the spoiled girlfriend approach but I dont want to ruin something with such potential.

Tips on how to set up a Tinder profile as a sugar baby.

How do I get a sugardaddy on tinder?

Besides outright stating I’m a SB, what else should I put on my Tinder profile to attract sugar daddy’s? Like is it the same as a profile on SA or should I keep it short?

Initial messages on Tinder are critical, yet guys don’t always grasp the importance!  Here are my thoughts to “get the ball rolling”

How do you spice up conversation with men on tinder/SA who have nothing in their bio that you can use to your advantage to spice up the conversation? I keep getting the hi , how you doing , nothing , where you from type of conversation. You would think older men would be clever and interesting in messages.

So after matching on tinder with men that are interested in being a sugar daddy wth do I talk to them about lol, do I tell them what I want because I really have no clue what to keep talking about after that. I’ve read post here to not talk to them about allowances thru there but to do it in person but I have no idea want to talk to them about after they say they are interested.

This post details the basic steps of moving from Tinder match to Arrangement

So I met this pot on tinder, and is it me just being paranoid or is it sketch that he would rather talk through the site. I offered him my email and offered to take his number

Don’t try to judge a guy’s wealth based on a Tinder profile.  

I was thinking of using tinder for SD searching, but I’m not sure of how to tell real wealth. I know that the clothing is apart of it. Do you have any tips to identify it in pbotos

And last, but definitely not least, I am including a link to a post that I found (the sugar baby who posted it has been since deactivated, so I can’t give her a proper shout out) that gives great tips on how to use Tinder.  As an added bonus, her tips can be used with sugar websites as well.  It is very good and definitely worth the read!

It’s going down; I’m yelling Tinder

Peridot went from a cold and calculating villain to a pretty comic character in this season. Can you describe your thoughts behind that character’s transformation?

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There’s a principle that the psychiatrist Carl Jung introduced that I find really interesting — this idea of “enantiodromia,” that a superabundance of a force will inevitably produce it’s opposite. I think of that with Peridot. It’s her obsession with rules and regulations, her belief that things can be one way and one way only, and her unquestioning obedience toward Yellow Diamond that eventually rockets her into becoming a rebel and anarchist when she realizes Yellow Diamond is capable of being wrong. How can you believe in what makes sense when what makes sense doesn’t make sense anymore? She’s excited by the infinite potential of everything, and fascinated by her own capacity to care, because those things had been a total blind spot for her.

— 

Rebecca Sugar, in an interview with Entertainment Weekly

She’s excited by the infinite potential of everything, and fascinated by her own capacity to care, because those things had been a total blind spot for her.