such-natural-movement

Ok I don’t have anyone to talk to right now, I just had to be socially trans in person for an hour while signing legal forms, and I’m strung out and tired. SO I’M GOING TO RANT ABOUT CONSTRUCTED LANGUAGES AND MAGICAL SCRIPTS.

Look, I get it. You want your conlang/magic script to look mystical, cryptic, special. You want it to look different than any other language while still looking like a language people write in. If you’re a spiritual person or magic-user this may even be a language you’re channeling and that you believe to be ancient in nature or otherwise pre-existing. But 95% of conlangs and magical scripts look totally fake and made-up, and this is not a judgment I’m casting on their actual grammatical structure or language theory or the languages they were based on. The thing that makes a language look like one people ever actually wrote in for hundreds of years, that makes it look like the letters/characters are all from the same language, is that it looks like a language that’s been written in whatever tools you are claiming or feel like it was traditionally written in.

Let’s take cuneiform:

Looks super-neat, right? Man, who’d ever think of having those wedges in an alphabet! It’s totally different than most modern languages out there and very distinctive, and the wedges are consistent across the letters, so it makes them all look like they’re from the same alphabet. This wasn’t just arbitrarily designed as a font style. There is a reason for this!

Cuneiform writing was pressed into wet clay with these shaped bits and that’s why it looks like that. It got stamped with wedges. That’s how (this type of) writing was done at the time. It’s a technological solution and that’s what makes the lettering get that peculiar stylization. You’ll get variants based on craftsmanship and tools, but basically the method is the same across various implementations. Once someone tried to write that in pencil, you could imagine it’d look different, and you’d see evidence of people’s hand-motion between strokes, becoming more of a tilt between letters.

For instance, English looks like it does, even in tumblr’s sans-serif fonts, because it can be constructed with a pen. When it gets fancy with a variable-width pressure-sensitive pen nib, you can get more complex and flowy, but notice the flow and arc still go with the movements natural for a hand to make:

Originally posted by heaven-knows-im-miserable-n0w

Those little trails between letters exist today because nib pens were drippy and left ink trails. The written language adapted to the tools to incorporate the trails and still make it look legible, and that’s why we have cursive writing at all. This is a simplified history but it’s basically there to make you think about the letter shapes in various traditional ways of writing in English and why it looks like it does instead of like cuneiform.

Which brings me to conlangs. If you want your brand new ancient-looking language to truly look like people have used it for eons, write it out with the tools you think those people would have used, and keep adapting the letters if you find that, say, a brush or nib pen can’t construct the weird arcs and whirls you’ve designed the language to have. Languages by and large are made to be convenient to write. If you don’t know how to write kanji, Chinese words probably look complex and arbitrary to you. But their shapes are logical when you see them written with a brush:

So if you have some arcane-looking swooshy script but it still looks kind of fake, think about where the weight should really be. It should be where the brush presses down heavier and the trailing marks are where the brush lifts up (and usually leaves the paper and ends the stroke). Where the stroke is wide on one end is where the brush initially met the paper. Above, you can see how one swish immediately flows into another, the strokes are like arrows leading across the page when you understand how they’re created. Pick up a brush and figure out an actual stroke order for your symbol. If logically the stroke seems like it’d leave someone’s hand smearing it trying to follow its arc, then logically that symbol would eventually get redesigned if it were in an actual language. Someone would figure out a better way to write it and everyone would adopt that way over time.

So practice writing your language with different tools. Consider a calligraphy course or even just a kit with a guidebook (or youtube training videos!). Written language is a tool that people use, magical as it can be. And if you’re using it for magical purposes such as woodburning it into tools or painting it onto things or writing it onto paper, consider that your symbols will change a bit according to the tools, just like with mundane languages. A wedge-shaped wood burner will get you something a bit closer to cuneiform. A brush will get you something flowy and not super-precise. Pencil will not leave ink trails and will get you something more technical and practical. Your written language logically should shift for that and adapt like a proper tool. And if you do that right, if you really use it, then it will look much more genuine because it will have experienced an actual evolution of form adapting to the physical tools it’s been worked with via.

And if you’re not using it for magic but are just using it for a fantasy setting where people use it for magic in the story, all the above would still apply to them.

Even with just one symbol not meant to be in a greater language, think about the tool you’re creating it with. It’s hard to make a realistic brush-style symbol in pencil. Use the tool that fits the symbol and you’ll produce something much more genuine-looking.

That’s it! I’m not a language expert, this is not meant to be A Real Factual History Of All Language, it’s just a rough primer in How To Make It Look Like A Language Is Actually Written With. It’s not meant to be a critique in whether your magical language is “real” enough or “magical” enough either. It’s simply some pointers in how to make a magical/constructed language that’s actually reasonable to write with and suits the tools you’re writing it with and the purposes you mean it for. Hundreds of years of written language evolution is hard to replace, but I believe in you.

Women outside of the African diaspora, please stop saying "rock your natural hair."

From straightening to color processing, we put our hair through a lot to achieve the looks we want. Rarely do we consider working with what we already have. Think about it: when was the last time you wore your hair as is? This season, we’re challenging you to embrace your hair and rock a style that works with your natural texture, not against it.

Not convinced? Just take a look at the three POPSUGAR staffers ahead who have each come to love their unique hair texture over the years and revealed their tips for showing it off. Whatever your hair type, their relatable stories and gorgeous no-fuss styles will inspire you to rethink it the next time you find yourself reaching for a hot tool.

(cont. POPSUGAR)

This article isn’t all that important, but look at the women chosen to “rock their natural hair.”

Who thinks of these women when you hear the phrase natural hair? I just want to make a plea:  Women outside of the African diaspora, please stop saying “rock your natural hair.”  You can call it virgin.  You can call it unprocessed.  You can call it anything other than natural hair because that’s a movement for Black women.  

I’m not saying this as part of an overreach of cultural appropriation accusations at all, because this has nothing to do with that.  This isn’t the n-word conversation where the answer to “can I say it too?” is always an emphatic NO! from the majority of people. And I have no problem with women of all backgrounds embracing the hair as it sprouts from their heads without the addition of heat or chemicals.  I support any trend where women aren’t doing damage to part of themselves to fit a beauty standard.

But.  The women in these photos have never not been allowed to wear their hair without chemicals or damaging processes.  There has never been a point in history these women couldn’t just wash and go, even if that meant a wash and go with a hair band.  The hair types on these women are always acceptable in any business or social situation.  They’ve never been denied a job because of their hair.  They’ve never been told they’re aggressive or too political because of their hair.  Their hair has never been illegal.  (You can have a different conversation about countries where women have to cover their hair, but that applies to all women, not just women of a certain race, and it applies to all hair, not just hair that’s kinky, so the legality isn’t based on hair at all.)

Black women rocking their natural hair has nothing to do with white women learning to manage their frizz.  Those are two separate conversations.  One is about actually fitting into society and the other is about managing a beauty standard that always caters to women who look like you anyway.  The natural hair movement is about re-teaching Black women how to care for their hair after all of that knowledge was lost to our people when we were dragged to this continent and forced to use sheep shears and banned from traditional African hairstyles.  Natural hair blogs and messageboards and haircare lines aren’t just educational resources, but emotional ones as well, where Black women can discuss their struggles embracing their natural kinks and coils in a society where the beauty standard for hair is the women in these pictures instead.  When non-Black women take up the charge of “rocking their natural hair” it dilutes the conversation and it makes it harder to connect.  There are way more non-Black women than Black women in this country and they will drown out the voices who needed the support the most if allowed to.

So as a courtesy, find some other banner.  The natural hair movement wasn’t started for y'all or by y'all and it’s not as integral to y'all’s culture or survival.  So just use a different term.  Once again, y’all saw something cute and catchy that Black people were doing, wanted to capitalize on it, and whitewashed the meaning out of it.  Skipping your weekly blowout in the summer has nothing to do with taking the risk of being fired if you waltz into work without a mid-length sew-in and your coils on display instead.  Find another way to share white girl hair tips.  Please.

Edit: I really don’t get what’s so hard to understand about this.

anyway i just woke up and i just wanna say the natural hair movement being dominated by biracial/racially ambiguous girls with 3a or looser hair is like highkey damaging because even in something designed to help all black girls love their hair in it’s most natural state, there are still standards being upheld to fit in or seem well managed and less unruly and “nappy” and all these products and tips are dedicated to either naturally looser curl patterns aka The Mixed Girl Curl or helping you try to transform your thick ass, kinky ass class 4 whatever letter hair into a looser texture or at least play your shit off as if it’s a loose texture and me and my 4c hair are uncomfortable and that’s that on that good morning and hi i’m annoyed!

So, @witches-ofcolor and I were talking about how we feel (and others) that the natural hair community has pretty much forgotten that type 4 (especially 4c) hair exists. Type 4 people aren’t being as praised and recognized in the natural hair community as we should despite the fact that the natural hair movement was kind of made for us.

Type four girls/boys are the ones who were supposed to be uplifted by the movement and encouraged and people tend to forget we exist.

Even worse, people (even in the natural hair community) act like having type 4 hair especially 4c hair is a bad thing. So many people don’t go natural because they fear they’re gonna have type 4 hair.

So…that said, we think there needs to be a day to appreciate people with type 4 hair. The natural hair community has done such a bad job at it as it is, even natural hair product companies ignore type 4 people, so we need a day to ourselves.

So on July 1st 2017, we are going to be hosting a little event in appreciation for Type 4 hair. It’s simple, if you have type 4 hair, then just post a picture of yourself (or submit to this blog), and we’ll reblog it. The day will be tagged #naturalhair day, so make sure you tag that.

This way, there will be some well needed recognition for type 4 people.

So please, reblog this post, and spread the word. Because Type 4 hair is so underappreciated and I think a day like this will show people just how amazing their hair is.

If you have any questions please ask!

I’ll probably make more promos later on! So follow this blog for updates or just track #naturalhair day, to keep up with updates! Thanks!

3

Edit: Addition of the individual Posters, slightly different from the original with the full drawing. ^^

I tried to instill a bit more life with movement and natural elements such as the wind and snow. Something I use to do and maybe also because some of my The X-Files’s  favorites episodes are with the snow. I unconsciously want to find this again in season 11. ^^

Ready more than ever for #TheXFiles S11 from Août to the airing.  👽✖️🔦🙌

Are you? :)

I’m all here for the natural hair movement, but I feel like the natural hair movement has taken a step back. The women who are seen as the bigger advocates for the movement are either mixed or Hispanic. There’s nothing wrong with them being apart of the movement, but they should not be the spokeswomen for the movement when it was more intended for women with type 4 hair than type 3. The natural hair movement was more intended for women with type 4 hair so that they no longer had to grow up or go through life any longer being ashamed for being born with their type of hair being seen as “bad hair” or “nappy” (such an ugly word 🙄) or “ugly”. The women with type 3 hair should not be advocates for the movement for the reason being that they are always the ones labeled as “hair goals” which with women with type 4 hair cannot reach such goals because they are two completely different types of hair, and are pushed more to the side because many don’t see type 4 as “hair goals”. I love my natural hair but sometimes I shouldn’t feel ashamed for being born with my type 4 because society and men aren’t accepting more of it than a woman with type 3 😔.

I said this years ago; Afrobeats is going to spark a new consciousness in Africa that will play a huge role in the unity and the uprising of the African people. Music will bring the awareness. The natural hair movement, consciousness, family unity, higher vibrational music, the rise of holistic and herbal remedies and the trend of healthy eating and having knowledge in nutrition. Look around. A change is happening. I just hope my generation is alive to see it all transpire.

- Meggan Roxanne

They sink into quiet after that, watching the way the lightning moves and lights up the rain, listening to the thunder as it rolls and announces each strike. It’s one of the more beautiful nights of Louis’s life and he pretends to himself that he’s not including Harry in that assessment as well.

He doesn’t really think about it when he turns his head to rest on Harry’s shoulder, the movement as natural as it would be to keep sitting up. Harry doesn’t flinch at the new weight as he drinks from his glass, the world illuminating around them once more. In the flicker of light, Louis watches as Harry reaches his hand toward Louis’s knee and then pulls back abruptly and puts his hands in his own lap.

“You can touch me,” he says softly, knowing Harry hears him in the bubble that belongs to them.

He feels Harry’s jaw move along the top of his head when he smiles and then Harry’s hand is on his knee, fingers tucked on the inner seam of Louis’s sweats. It sends as much electricity through Louis as the lightning poles have been receiving all night. He suppresses a shiver when Harry moves his hand, his fingertips tracing the seam in a gentle up and down motion.

-from Walk That Mile | by purpledaisy @daisyharry


>>>Harry’s travel photo blog @harry-is-on-route-66 & moodboards by @allwaswell16<<<

>>>(Manips in the blog used with permission from @melmanpur and @bellustyles Thank you both!)<<<

>>>Written for @1dreversebang<<<