subheads

6

Matthais examined the posters. “One hundred thousand kruge!” He shot a disbelieving glower at Kaz. “You’re hardly worth that.”

The hint of a smile tugged at Kaz’s lips. “As the market wills it.”

Bonus! :

  • INTJ: No no no, I have an extremely sophisticated highlighting system. Purple is for headings, pink for subheadings, green for words of importance and sub-subheadings, blue for definitions, legislation and formulae, yellow for examples and orange for hyperactive highlighting. So no, you can not borrow the orange, it is essential to the system. Hmm, you can have... Yellow, until further notice.
  • INTP: *leans in*
  • INTP: *whispers* Your J is showing

Day to Day

Take good notes. 

  • Always take the notes for a particular class in the same notebook. Spiral bound notebooks were invented because they solved the problem of keeping related information consolidated in one place. Take advantage of this.
  • Date each entry into your notebook.
  • It is usually best to keep the notes for different classes separate from each other. Spiral notebooks with built in dividers are excellent for this purpose.
  • Your notes should contain as complete a record of what the instructor said as possible. Of course, you should not try to write every word spoken, but don’t leave out ideas. When you study, your notes should call back to your mind the entire sequence of ideas presented. Take care to spell all new words carefully. It you don’t know how to spell a word, ask your instructor to write it on the board. Most will automatically do so for new or difficult terms.
  • Anything the instructor writes on the board should appear in your notes. If the instructor took the time to write it out, he or she considers it important. You should do the same.
  • If possible, try to take your notes in some kind of outline form. The organization of ideas is as important as the content of those ideas, especially when it comes to learning the material for an exam.
  • You might find it useful to have a second color of pen or pencil available for highlighting important ideas or indicating vocabulary.

Be involved in your classes. 

Don’t simply pretend you are a sponge, ready to soak up whatever the instructor says. You are there to learn, not to be taught.

  • If the instructor is moving too rapidly for you, or if you don’t understand what is being said, say something!
  • Ask questions if you are confused. Confusion is definitely your worst enemy.
  • If your class includes group activities, participate as fully as you can. Such exercises are done for your benefit, not to provide a break for the instructor.

Review your notes every day. 

This suggestion is one which we have all heard a thousand times. Unfortunately, most of us never really believe it until we actually try it. Spend 30 minutes or so each evening going over the notes from each class. There are at least two tremendous benefits to be gained from this discipline.

  • Research has shown that reviewing new material within 24 hours of hearing it increases your retention of that material by about 60%. This means that you will be 60% ahead of the game the next time you walk into class. If you want to significantly reduce the time necessary to prepare for exams, this is the way to do it.
  • Reviewing material before the next class period enables you to identify points of confusion or omission in your notes, which prepares you to ask the questions you need to ask before the next lecture. Again, confusion is your worst enemy.

It is excellent policy to give high priority to new vocabulary. Language is the most fundamental tool of any subject, and it can seriously handicap you to fall behind in this.

Keep up on your reading. 

Unlike most high school teachers, many college instructors don’t give specific reading assignments. You are expected to go to your text for the reading related to the materials covered in class. Be independent enough to do this without being told.

Using Your Textbook

Don’t expect your instructor to give you detailed, page by page textbook assignments. While some may do so, many do not. College teachers are much more likely to expect you to use your own initiative in making use of the text.

In most cases, it will be most useful for you to at least skim the relevant chapters before each lecture. You should receive a course outline/syllabus at the beginning of the quarter, which will tell you the subject for each day. You may receive chapter references (or even page references), or you instructor may expect you to be perceptive enough to refer to the Table of Contents.

  • When you first approach a chapter, page through it fairly quickly, noting boldface headings and subheadings, examining figures, illustrations, charts, etc., and thinking about any highlighted vocabulary terms and concepts. Also take note of the pedagogical aids at the end of the chapter–study questions, summary, etc.
  • When you have finished surveying the chapter, return to the beginning and read in more detail. Remember to concentrate upon understanding. Don’t simply read through the words. Any words which you don’t understand you should look up. If you own the book and intend to keep it, you may want to write definitions of such words in the margins. You may also find it helpful to make observations and other useful notes in the margins. If you don’t intend to keep the book yourself, you should carry out similar activities on a page in your class notebook.
  • On this first trip through the chapter, you should concentrate upon catching the major subjects and points of the material. Also take note of those things which you don’t understand. If the lecture on the material doesn’t clarify those points, you should ask your instructor to explain.

Following coverage of the chapter’s material in class, you should go back to the book and read it again. It will probably be helpful to skim through it first, as you did when you first looked at it. The tables and figures should be more readily read in detail. If you are a truly conscientious student, you will outline the chapter and prepare a vocabulary list of the terms which are pertinent.

At this time you should think seriously about the review and study questions at the end of the chapter. Do your best to answer all of them as if they were a take-home exam.

You may also want to develop a system of cross referencing symbols to use when comparing your class notes to your notes from the text.

Remember that your instructor will probably not use the same words which you find in the text book. nothing is more frustrating than to discover that what you hear in class is no more than a rehash of what you read in the book. However, if your instructor knows his/her subject, and the author of your text knows his/her subject, the meat of what they say should be the same. 

NOTE: Nobody is infallible. Your instructor may make mistakes. Don’t expect them to be more than human.

Preparing Assignments

Here’s another thing we have all been told thousands of times: Don’t leave assignments until the day before they are due! If you have a paper to write or a lab report to prepare, begin it as soon as possible. In most cases, instructors will be delighted to receive work early. Remember that many papers or projects require quite a bit of research before you can even begin writing. In most cases, it is impossible to accomplish the necessary preparation in one day or even one week. In some cases, instructors won’t accept late work at all. They are perfectly justified.

Another sore point: Be aware of the appearance of the work you submit. You should want to be proud of every assignment you submit, and that includes being proud of its appearance. If possible, assignments should always be typed. Never turn in an assignment written in pencil. Pages torn out of notebooks are sloppy and unsightly.Think about this point every time you hand an instructor an assignment. That paper represents the quality of your work, and your instructor is perfectly justified in taking its appearance into consideration when assigning a grade.

Preparing for Exams

Keep in mind that you want to be an active learner, not a passive one. The more you use and manipulate the information, the better you will understand it. Using and manipulating information in as many ways as possible also maximizes your ability to access your memory.

Do not wait until the night before an exam to study! Of course, you should be regularly reviewing your notes, but the preparation still takes time.

If your instructor hasn’t explained to you how he or she designs exams, ask. this is a perfectly legitimate concern. However, keep in mind that an instructor has the right to design exams in whatever fashion he or she sees fit, and in most cases you have no business asking for changes in that design. You need to learn to handle all testing styles–including the dreaded essay exam!

A good first step in preparation is to read through your notes a couple of times. While you are doing this, you might also;

  • Highlight major topics and subtopics, with the goal of generating an outline of your notes. Even if you take your notes in outline form, this is a good practice. Major topics often extend through more than one day’s lecture, and it is easy to lose track of the overall picture from day to day.
  • With a second color, highlight all vocabulary terms.

Outline the entire set of notes. When you study a large body of information, you should study from concept to detail, not the other way around. It will, in fact, be much easier to learn the details if you take the time to learn the concept and theory first. The least efficient approach to studying is to attempt to memorize your notes from beginning to end. It’s not the words which are important–it’s the ideas.

Consider ways of dealing with the information other than those used in class. the more ways you can manipulate and experience the material you are trying to learn, the more secure your understanding and memory will be. Some suggestions:

  • Make charts, diagrams and graphs.
  • Make lists.
  • If the subject matter includes structures, practice drawing those structures. Remember that a drawing is useless unless the important structures are labeled.

There are almost always types of information which you will have to memorize (eg. vocabulary). No one has ever invented a better device for memorizing than flash cards.

One of the most universally effective ways to polish off your study activities is to prepare a self test.

  • Challenge yourself as severely as you can.
  • As you are studying, keep a running collection of “exam questions.” If you seriously attempt to write difficult and meaningful questions, by the time you finish you will have created a formidable exam. When you begin to feel you’re ready for your instructor’s exam, take out your questions and see if you can answer them. If you can’t, you may need to go back and reinforce some of the things your are trying to learn.

Never, ever pull an “All-Nighter" on the night before an exam. This is a "freshman trick,” meaning that good students learn very quickly that it is futile. What you may gain from extra study time won’t compensate for the loss of alertness and ability to concentrate due to lack of sleep.

On exam day:

  • Try not to “cram” during every spare moment before an exam. This only increases the feeling of desperation which leads to panic, and then to test anxiety. You may find it useful, on the night before an exam, to jot down a few ideas or facts which you wish to have fresh in your mind when you begin the exam. Read through your list a couple of times when you get up in the morning and/or just before you take the exam, then put it away. This kind of memory reinforcement not only improves your performance on the test, it also improves your long-term memory of the material.
  • Be physically prepared.
    • Get a good night’s sleep.
    • Bring necessary writing materials to the test–at least 2 writing tools, erasers, blue books if necessary, calculators if appropriate and allowed. Be aware of what the instructor has specified as permitted for use. Some instructors object to exams written pencil; some prohibit use of tools like calculators. It is your responsibility to know these requirements; you should be prepared to take the consequences if you don’t.
    • This may seem silly, but go to the bathroom just before the exam. Don’t expect your teacher to let you leave to do this during the test! The tension which generally goes along with taking an exam may increase the need to perform this physical activity, so you may need to go, even though you don’t particularly feel like it.

Some Final Suggestions

You should receive a syllabus for each class. This is the Rule Book for that class (in my classes, we call it the Survival Manual). Know everything on that syllabus! Your teacher has the right to expect you to know and abide by any rules and stipulations on that document, and it is perfectly within his/her rights to penalize you for failing to do so. Respect dates and deadlines, and expect to lose points if you turn things in late.

Never miss an exam if you can help it. You will rarely be more ready for the exam in two or three days than you are on the scheduled date, and the annoyance the teacher will feel about having to arrange a special exam time for you can actually hurt your grade in the end. Miss exams only if you absolutely have to.

Save everything. Never throw away a handout or a returned assignment or exam. With this in mind, equip yourself with a pouched folder for each class.

Develop systematic behavior patterns associated with your schoolwork.

  • Keep your class materials together and neat.
  • Never allow yourself to be caught at school without the necessary notebooks and materials. If you develop systematic habits with respect to attending classes, etc., this will be no problem.

It is excellent practice to set aside a study area at home, and to designate a particular span of time each day as study time. However, don’t fall into the trap of feeling that study should never exceed the preordained time limits. You put in as much study time as is necessary to master the material for your classes.

[image description: a graphic featuring text laid over two boxes of different shades of blue.

the first box is smaller and contains two headings, “So your buddy’‘s disabled:” followed by “How Can I Help?” in quotation marks.

the second box is larger and contains a list of five subheadings and descriptions, which are as follows:

1. Pity parties are boring. I don’t need you to tell me how awful my life must be or how sorry you are that I have to deal with it. I don’t care. I’m doing exactly the same as everyone else - managing with what I’ve got.

2. Don’t assume I’m incapable. I can still open doors for myself and hold a conversation. Even with a crutch. Blind-blowing, I know. It’s frankly a little insulting how quickly people will rush to ‘help’ me when I’m using a mobility aide. If you’re not sure, then ask first! Or alternatively, wait for me to ask you.

3. Let me grab you on the stairs. Stairs fuckin’ suck and I may have to grab something very quickly in order to avoid collapsing. Sometimes that something may be you and I am always very grateful for your presence in this situation.

4. Meet in accessible spaces. If you choose to sit somewhere I can’t get to, i.e. upstairs, then I’m left with three options: a) I kick up a fuss and make you move, b) I get hurt by forcing myself to join you, or c) I sit on my own. None of these options are ideal for any of us but they could all be avoided if you’d sat somewhere else.

5. Listen to me. My condition and how I’m feeling with it changes from day to day, and what was fine yesterday might not be today. I will always try my best to communicate what I can and can’t manage; all you need to do is keep an open mind and listen to what I’m telling you.]


Not all of these points will apply to everyone with a disability, but certainly the 1st, 2nd and 5th should apply to almost everyone. I often find that nobody really knows what to do when they discover that I’m disabled, and I’m often asked “how can I help?” but never have much of an answer, so I finally thought I’d put together a masterlist for my friends to take a look at.

How to take notes from a textbook

Knowing what to and what not to write down from a textbook is a often an issue when studying. Should I include this or is that completely necessary? Hopefully these few tips will help anyone struggle to use their textbook!

  • Read the textbook prior to taking notes - This helps give you a solid understanding of the material so you can summarise and shorten your notes. Have a good understanding is great to help shorten your notes, since you can avoid copying the menial information.
  • Highlight some key points, terms and concepts before taking notes - Remember not to over-highlight, keep it brief and minimal; key words, facts, and statistics!
  • Have a colour coding system - This helps to visualise your notes when trying to memorise information and also makes your notes more effective material to learn from. Making sure you’re using the same colours for highlighting your textbook and writing your notes. My colour coding system can be found here.
  • Use the layout of the textbook to organise your notes - I found copying the headings and subheadings really helped simplify and ensure I was learning each section. It’s much easy to find information when you’re skimming through notes. This also ensures that you can remember what topic areas relate to others, meaning you can add more into your essays under exam conditions!
  • Include different ways to show the information - Use mindmaps, bullet points, graphs, flow chats, and post-it notes to help visualise the content. Breaking up your notes with graphics is a good way to avoid full pages of writing and great for memorising statistics or key elements of a topic.
  • Supplement your notes - Use other textbooks and your own research to expand the depth of your notes. This is highly important for subjects that can require evidence, statistics and evaluations. Making sure this information is embedded into your notes is great for writing essays.
  • Add your own personal touch - Add doodles, acronyms, and abbreviations to help your study. Little things that make important information unique and standout will help you recall it later!
  • Summarise each chapter - Make a final summary of each chapter using sticky notes or flash cards. Once you’ve read your textbook, you’ll have a collection of chapter summaries ready to study from.

Each of these tips have helped me recreate notes that are well-rounded and full of brief but useful information. I hope this information helps. Let me know if it does! 

❝ I love you too, Jungkook. ❞

Plot: You’re an idol and you’re dating Jungkook. You show up at one of his fan sign and he says to everyone that you two are dating. 

Pairing: JungkookxReader 

Words count: 1,8k+

Genre: Fluff 

For anon, I hope you like it cutie! - M. 

Gif isn’t mine, credits to the owner! ♥

Deciding to go meet your boyfriend during a fan sign didn’t seem to be any more a great idea as at the beginning. The black mask covered your face and fortunately your eyes didn’t reveal much of who you were. Yet the feeling of being perpetually observed didn’t seem to disappear and so the anxiety increased to every minute that passed.  

But you haven’t seen Jungkook for weeks, and if that was the only way to change the situation, you’d be well-born to be discovered.  

“Next time I’ll close you in our room.” Your best friend muttered, as well as the leader of your group and the worst advocate in the world; making you smile amused from underneath the mask.  

“I didn’t ask you to come.. Then we repeated several times that we’re their fans, even if they discovered there I know hey couldn’t see anything strange… ”  

“YOU KNOW? I swear that if I read another article where they ship me and Taehyung I shoot myself. ”  

“What a bad thing Unnie…. In short, Taehyung is an incredible guy. ” You whispered in response, not understanding all that boredom towards that sweet and a little crazy boy. “Then he is also extremely beaut–”  

“But think of your boy!”  

“You Like him! That’s why you’re bored by the articles…. because you’re ashamed to talk to him. ”  

The slap that came soon after on your shoulder only made you entertain more, while patiently expected your turn to go to get the album signed.  

He was as beautiful as always but he seemed particularly cheerful that day, he could even not to bully his hyung and his smile could make you completely melt. It’s been seven months since you started to date and you’ve already figured out you were falling in love with him, but you were too intimidated and scared to confess your feelings. It was your first serious “relationship”, although not yet effective because he didn’t really ask you to be his girlfriend and you were both so young that you were afraid that he could run away in front of your confession.  

“Jungkook-oppa!” “Jungkook, you are beautiful!” “Jungkook I love you!”  

Keep reading

BS Bending in TLOK

Watching The Legend of Korra is so disappointing in a lot of different ways. So if you ignore the plot, you’d expect at least some good action scenes with the effort and consistency from the old show. Ehhhh. The bending in LOK is strikingly idiotic and a degradation of the gem from the old show. Maybe if I weren’t comparing it to The Last Airbender, I wouldn’t mind it. But the fact it is so blatantly off from its predecessor makes for another highlight of Korra that I can’t un-see. From how elements are manipulated to even more complex shit with specific kinds of ~special people bending~, Korra, if I can put this politely, fucks everything up.

Right from the start you can tell that Korra definitely dumbed down the movements of the characters. It’s odd because the martial arts expert from Avatar worked on Korra as well. However, he only worked on 22 episodes of Korra, compare that with his 61 episodes guided in The Last Airbender. It’s probably a mix of Kisu’s lack of involvement, and an overall decision from the writers that maybe it wasn’t as important? Which is sad, because it really disassociates the audience from the complex spirituality and intricacies of the world. Styles benders seem to have spent years mastering are lost, and replaced with a modern, boxing type “PUNCH PUNCH PUNCH!!!” Hollywood action situation. Here’s some pretty (MS PAINT) pictures to do the talking for me.

And a bonus:

If the simplification of normal bending hasn’t gotten to you, there’s still a lot more I have to sift through. There’s so much shit pointing to how bending’s complexity was reduced for coooool moments. I’m even going to make nice little subheaders.

Lavabending 

So, in ATLA we see lavabending is a feat only the Avatars are capable of. Roku does it, Kyoshi does it. Avatar cool kids only. But then in Book Three, Bolin suddenly has the ability to lavabend at the tip of the hat. Which, by the way, is another thing stupidly prevalent throughout this series. Both Korra and Bolin in times of crisis suddenly have the ability to do things they couldn’t do, but really wished they could’ve. Hooow convenient.

So the discrepancy here is how Bolin can lavabend, and so can this random Earthbender guy, wouldn’t that mean all Earthbenders can? Metalbending makes sense, but lava is so hot it’s going to set stuff on fire. Technically, it counts as two elements, and has been confirmed as such by making it an Avatar-only thing in ATLA. But now these two random guys can just do this. Apparently it may even be easier than metalbending, which is also ridiculous. If lavabending is just bending the Earth to “go fast”, that’s a lot easier than metalbending because there’s more mass to bend. Just make it go zoom zoom and blamo everyone’s a lavabender.

Some people like to claim that because Bolin had an Earthbending dad and a Firebender mom, then that means he can control both elements to control lava. Which is dumb because then that would make him a fanfic-esque Dual Bender. And we really don’t need any of those. It’s never explained or justified, and is so different from the original show, it feels…sacrilegious. How dare you dishonor the lore. /s

BALD AIRBENDING MAN

What’s his name?

I don’t really care, because he’s dumb too. I feel like I don’t have to elaborate, though. It should be pretty obvious. ~Harmonic Converge~ (weird af plot device) gave him airbending, and because he studied it before and read a book by an Airbender Lady, he’s a master at it now. His powers are so innate, he worked so little to get to where he is. Hell, he didn’t work at all.

Unless you want me to believe that all his days in prison, he anticipated becoming an airbender and practiced all the moves beforehand. Granted, there are no official moves anymore. I’m sure he’s experienced in reckless punching. That’s all you need to bend, right?

If he can read a book and be great at airbending, why can’t Korra. Why didn’t Aang read THREE books to go defeat Ozai. Aang just should’ve read Earthbending for Dummies. Then he could bend the entire world off its axis. And This Bald Guy can jump off a cliff after quoting some “deep airbending lore” and he can FLY. Not even propelled by anything or even (AGAIN I REITERATE) moving his arms to BEND the currents around him. He’s not flying. He’s floating. And floating characters have always seemed like pretty bad animation, seriously. He looks like a late-stage yuri on ice character. Super out of place, and moving oddly across an undefined plane.

MAKO IN GENERAL

Mako does a couple things I’m not a big fan of. Ok, a lot of things. But in terms of bending, I have a few choice picks.

In Legend of Korra, lightning and its redirection has a lot less of an impact. Being electrocuted no longer hurts anyone unless the writers want us to feel bad for a character being hurt (usually Korra). But half of the time, it’s just there to look really COOL and not really do anything. This is proven by two things. Mako shoots lightning right on Amon at point blank, and Amon isn’t affected. The same is true for Mako. He HOLDS ON to the lightning and ISN’T AFFECTED AT ALL. Let me make another ATLA/LOK comparison.

Zuko: Tries to redirect lightning, gaurding his torso so hopefully it doesn’t hit him. In the end it does and he’s pretty much out of the fight.

Mako: Doesn’t even really care if he’s hit by the lightning at all. He holds on to it for a good few seconds, because it’s not like electrocution hurts or anything. Only after getting a REFRESHING SHOCK for a good bit does he decide to toss it back at the Robo Man.

Maybe this would make sense because Mako is supposed to be a cool, all-powerful Firebender. But then even that theory breaks down, because he can withstand the strongest forms of raw fuckin’ Bending Power from all elements, apparently.

He does another of these dumb moves when he’s being bloodbended by Amon. We see Amon being bloodbended, but he escapes the grip, and the audience assumes it’s because he’s a bloodbender. But then suddenly MAKO CAN DO IT TOO. What a great guy.

Also Amon’s fine from this shock as well. And this kind of encompasses everything I’ve touched on. There’s Amon bending without moving, Mako having unrealistic powers never touched on before, and powers that are nerfed to all hell just to add ~drama~ in replace of actual sense.

TL;DR: LOK’s bending is saturated action filler written in for wish fulfillment, sacrifices old techniques and inner consistency for cool looking moves and scenarios, and shows a disappointing lack of passion or misunderstanding of the source material

Amazing Naruto/YOI/Mystic Messenger artists/art blogs I've come across.

Hey guys, if you’re looking for artists/blogs that create/posts content for Naruto/ Yuri On Ice/ Mystic Messenger, the following blogs are ones I know of and love. You’re welcome :-)

Note: if you have a blog dedicated to posting art (that you own or have permission to post) and want to be included, message me ! Just as, if you were tagged and do not wish to be included message me and I’ll remove you.

!!some of these blogs have posts that include nsfw content!!

Ps. I tagged anyone who had at least 5 arts related to these headings

NOT EVERY BLOG LISTED IS DEDICATED FULLY TO THE SUBHEADING. You’ll have to search through their tags to find their art.

–some blogs were tagged under more than one category–

Naruto blogs

-SasuSaku-

-NaruHina-

-ShiIta-

-SasuNaru-

-KakaSaku-

-ShikaTema-

-NejiTen-

-KakaYama-

-InoSaku-

-Naruto generally-

Mystic Messenger blogs

Yuri On Ice blogs

I’ll be updating this post twice a month, every 14th and 28th. Send in your suggestions via ask/ messages. I can add more subheadings for Naruto (such as  NaruSaku, InoSaku, SasuKarin, etc) if you wish just ask me.

[Last updated: 12/4/2017]

I get a lot of questions about how I take my lecture notes, and so I thought a quick post might be helpful! I’ve said many a time that I don’t do anything too complex with my notes, nor do a re-write them - but this system really works well for me!

The Basics

First off, I write all my lecture notes in black pen. Sometimes this is a Bic pen, sometimes a Sharpie Fineliner. My highlighters are the Zebra Mildliners. I don’t underline and highlight my notes until after the class, usually the next day. This allows me to focus more in class and gives me an opportunity to review the information at a later date. 

Structure

At the top of the page I’ll always write the date in full and the name of the module that those notes are for, followed by title for that lecture. Underneath, you can see that I’ve devised a colour coding system with highlighters. I usually do ‘citations’, 'examples’ and 'important info’, but this may vary depending on the lecture content, so I do this step after I’ve completed the notes. 

Subheadings

Each section of the lecture is given a subheading, which I will underline - again after the class has ended, usually at home. I use the subheadings which feature on the PowerPoint, but rather than writing the information shown on those I base my notes off of what the lecturer is saying.

Indentations

I indent my writing for examples and for the text that follows them, as you can see with 'the diggers’ and my definitions of the green economy. I find this makes it much easier to identify and follow as you re-read your notes. 

Symbols and Shorthand

I use little right-angle arrows like you can see at the top of the page for my 'follow through points’, which act as consequences for the point that is mentioned above. I will use three dots {like this  } as a symbol for 'therefore’. It concludes the points that I have made and is usually based off of how the lecturer has summarised the point they are making. This makes my notes much more coherent.

I hope this has been informative and has maybe given you a few ideas on how to do your own lecture notes! xo

empressfortuna  asked:

Do you have any advice for someone putting together an RPG system for fun and to maybe play with friends? It's something I've started a couple of times (and I have a concept I really like sitting around that I'd like to try to flesh out into a system at some point), but I'm interested in what advice an industry professional has for an amateur.

Sure thing:

1. Start small.

If you’re an author, you don’t write the next Game of Thrones as your very first work, and if you’re a game designer, you don’t go straight to writing the next Dungeons & Dragons.

A good target for a beginning designer is a game that can be set forth in about 5000 words - i.e., basically a sixteen-page pamphlet if you’re aiming for print publication. Have a look at other very short RPGs to get a feel for what the minimal set of stuff you need to include is. Good examples include:

Several of these look like they break my length guideline, but that’s because they include introductory fiction, sample adventures, GM advice sections, etc. Ignore all that for now - zero in on the rules themselves.

2. Start with premise.

Not setting, not mechanics - if you start with those, you’ll end up with a collection of neat worldbuilding bits and dice-rolling tricks that don’t actually add up to anything.

Have a clear idea in your head of what the prototypical session of your game, the Platonic ideal of an adventure, looks like from beginning to end, and ensure that all of the material you write - rules, setting, etc. - directly supports that premise. You can branch out later, but it’s absolutely critical that you get that core right first. If you’re not sure whether a given piece of material directly supports that core? It probably doesn’t - lose it.

3. Outline, outline, outline.

Resist the urge to just leap in and start writing. You can note stuff down for later if you want (see point 5, below), but if you just start writing, at best you’re going to end up with a disorganised mess; at worst, you’ll become irresolvably stuck when you run into some critical aspect of your premise that you haven’t thought about yet.

Good organisation is much more important in game rules than it is in prose fiction, so effort spent here pays off huge later. A good game outline should ideally drill all the way down to what you plan to talk about in each individual paragraph. Use headings and subheadings if you have to. When you’re finished, you should be able to start writing your game simply by picking a portion of your outline and filling it in.

4. Give yourself deadlines.

This is the corollary of point 1, above. Even within a work of limited scope, it’s easy to iterate forever and never get anywhere, or to turn things over and over in your head without ever committing it to writing until all your enthusiasm for it dribbles away. Your first RPG should take no more than a couple of weeks to write; make time to work on it every day during that span.

(In fact, writing a complete RPG of this scope in a single day is an exercise that a lot of designers use to keep themselves sharp. You can Google “24 hour RPG” for numerous examples. Do not attempt to do this as your very first game, of course - it’s basically hard mode game design.)

5. Take notes.

Once you’re in the game-creating headspace, neat ideas on how to address various bits of your premise will be occurring to you at all hours of the day. If you have school or a day job, it’ll often be at times when you can’t drop everything to chase after the idea in question. You may be confident that you’ll remember it for later. You will not. Keep a notebook or a tablet on hand so that you can jot stuff down as it occurs to you.

6. Be a dictator.

Don’t be afraid to tell people how they ought to play the game. Some folks will tell you that this is bad design. These people are wrong. All game rules encode assumptions about how the game ought to be played; some games are merely more honest about it than others. You’ll save yourself a heap of trouble by being one of the honest ones.

7. Beta readers. Lots of ‘em.

This ties into the preceding point: as you write, you’re going to be making a vast array of assumptions about how the game ought to be played and how the rules are supposed to be executed. Many of these assumptions will seem so obvious to you that it wouldn’t occur to you to write them down, or will be so deeply embedded in your thinking about the game that you don’t even realise you’re making them.

The ability to step back and go “okay, what assumptions am I making about the player’s understanding and prior knowledge, and are these assumptions warranted?” is a skill. Unless you’re a technical writer or something in your day job, you do not yet possess this skill. The upshot is that your first attempt at a game (and your second, and your third…) will be incomprehensible to anyone who’s not you.

This doesn’t mean you’re a bad game designer. It does, however, mean that you need to get as many sets of eyes on your work as possible, and you need to respect and seriously consider the questions they ask, no matter how obvious the answers feel to you.

8. Never throw anything away.

You’re going to have many ideas that you can’t find a place for in your game. You’re going to have many more that you end up cutting because they turn out not to directly support your premise (see point 2, above). Don’t just delete them - keep a master document of your of unused ideas, preferably on Google Drive or another cloud-hosted service so it’s always accessible and impossible to accidentally lose.

Not only are you accumulating a store of material for future projects, but emotionally it’ll be a lot easier to give material you’ve put a lot of thought and work into the axe because it’s not working out in your current game when you can tell yourself that you’re not getting rid of it for good: you’re just not using it right now.

anonymous asked:

dear,emma may you please help me with my studying i do not understand how to properly study

Hi there! I’ll list a bit of a step-by-guide to getting started and actually studying. Hopefully that will give you some pointers and you’ll be able to revise!

  1. Firstly, it is important to make the disctination between what you’re studying for. As in are you studying for your finals, an in-class assessment or just a topic quiz in your next class? Obviously, bigger exams require a lot more studying and generally over a longer period of time whereas a topic quiz might just be some quick revision over a couple of days. Understanding the format of your upcoming exam or test can be important for knowing how to study!
  2. Figure out what you have to study. Write down what you need to go through to revise. You could do it on a computer, as a to-do list or as a mindmap - whatever works best for you. When you’re studying for several things at once, separate your subjects and use subheadings for each topic. I always use my syllabus or cirriculum to see what I’ve got to cover. It’s always a good idea to make a point of anything tough topics. For example if there is something you’ve struggled with during class, make that a proirity rather than studying something that you already know.
  3. Make a study plan! Having a schedule is a great way to organise and methodically study prior to your upcoming test. I would recommend using one my study schedule printables which you can download here (under weekly schedule) for free. Plan out your weekly routine - including activities you already have. Then you map out when you can study. You can check out an example of planning it out here.
  4. Get out everything you will need. Tidy your desk, pick out a few pens, a notebook, your laptop. Whatever you think will help!
  5. Have a read through your textbook (if you use one). Highlight or flag anything important. If you want to, summarise each chapter in 5-10 bullet points once you’ve read it.
  6. Figure out how you’re going to take study notes. I will generally do new study notes if I have big exams coming up. For me, I find writing study notes easiest on OneNote. You can see my formatting here. I will read through my in-class notes and textbook to take really brief notes. I will also add any additional information I find useful from the internet. You don’t need to re-do notes if you’ve already got some that are good for studying. I generally won’t re-do my notes properly if I have a smaller test coming up - perhaps just use flashcards or make some rough notes.
  7. Sometimes simple notes aren’t as effective than other revision methods. You could try writing flashcards (for things like vocabulary, definitions, summarises, equations), mindmaps for linked ideas (for things such as facts about a person or subheadings under one topic) or timelines/cause-and-effect maps (for history subjects or seeing connections between events). Figuring out what style works for you will make your study more effective. If you’re unsure what your learning style is, take this quiz! Once you know you can find more precise ways to study.
  8. Once you’ve finished notes, you need to review them! Read over them when you can. Highlight them. Teach your friends or family members!
  9. Read through past papers or sample answers. Depending on what examinatinon system you’re doing, you might be able to access previous years tests and the recommended style of answers. This is a great way to see how you compare and what you can do to improve your answers! It’s always a good way to test yourself if you do timed practices papers. That way you can see if you’re within the time frame and can finish.
  10. Check out YouTube for any educational videos on what you’re learning! Sometimes they’ll be short, descriptive videos about the topics you’re studying. It can be good to watch someone else teach you about it - especially if you’ve had trouble understanding from your teacher.
  11. Whilst studying is important, remember to take regular breaks and not overwhelm yourself. Taking time to destress is very important for your health. Burning out from over-studying isn’t fun.

Here are a few other links that might be useful to you:

I hope this helps! Best of luck with your studying. Remember to stay focused and positive. It is all worth it in the long run xx

anonymous asked:

Hi!! I was wondering if you had any advice for a newbie studyblr / bullet journalist ?

Hello there, lovely anon!! ♥ I actually joined the studyblr community pretty recently (just this month!) so I hope I can answer your question well /// !! Since I’m pretty new, there’s still quite a bit I have yet to learn myself! 


➸ advice for a new studyblr

Don’t be afraid to just start. 

  • Honestly! There’s no need to feel insecure about your posts, spreads, handwriting, picture quality, stationary - everyone in the studyblr community is so sweet and positive and helpful I begin to feel spoiled. I hope you do to!
  • Don’t feel self conscious about anything. You’re beautiful, wonderful, and perfect just the way you are. There is no better you than you!
  • Stop comparing your posts and blog to other people’s. There’s a lot for you to learn, and it won’t all come immediately. Notes, followers - it takes time. 

Reach out to other studyblrs!! 

  • Say hi, send asks, make friends! Make comments on other’s posts, send compliments or help where you can. Just being active in the community can help you get attention but also give you a wonderful time. A studyblr is to help you grow, and this is a great way to keep you motivated in doing so.
  • Along the same line, try to find ways to interact with your followers!

Tags, Tags, Tags! 

  • A lot of studyblrs will track a tag and will often reblog your content if you tag your original posts with it! You can find out what tag to put by checking out a studyblr’s page (for example, I track #studyfeather). You can make a list for yourself if that helps! (: But try not to be too overwhelming or overuse it. Maybe switch up which tracked tags you use from post to post. 
  • Make a tag for you to track! It would make sense that if you’re using tracked tags to make one for yourself to spread the love. 
  • Have a tag that is specific to your original content (mine is #featherpost)!!! It will make it nice and easy for those who come across your blog to find what you’re posting about. Having original content helps others have more interest in your blog!
  • A lot of what you are reblogging can serve as a resource for yourself. I like to reblog posts that inspire me, or have spreads I might try, masterposts, etc. If its important for you to find what you’re reblogging for later, make a tag system for yourself. For example, heres @ / studypetals’ tags page or @ / studyquill’s navigation page if you need any ideas. This is a great idea if other people begin using your blog as a resource as well. 

Take advantage of all the information you see. 

  • There are so many posts that address procrastination, time management, stress, note taking, school - anything at all - that is made available to you. It’s one thing to see the information, but it’s another to make use of it. (And don’t be afraid to share your knowledge either!) You can even make posts about trying out different advice if that helps motivate you to try something out.

Make an introductory post!

  • Help others get to know you better by putting together an introductory post! It’s never too late to make one, so don’t worry about making one if your blog has been up for a bit.
  • From what I’ve discovered, introductory posts tend to have the following information (not every one has ALL of this, it’s up to you what you’d like to add): name, age, school year, why you started a studyblr, your classes, some of your favorite studyblrs, other blogs you have (and other sites you’re on), any anything else you’d like to say/add. 
  • If you use tracked tags or tag studyblrs you love, it can help get your blog noticed! (:

Post original content!

  • I touched on this earlier, but this is so important. One of the best ways for your studyblr to succeed is posting your own work and sharing it to the community. You never know how many people will love it, be inspired by it, follow you from it, or contact you because of it.
  • Be fairly consistent in posting original content. I try to post at least once a week even though I’m pretty busy. It helps motivate me to keep my bujo and studyblr going! You can try out the 100 days of productivity or some studyblrs put together monthly study challenges you can keep up with. As an example, here’s a May Study Challenge I might try out!
  • In posting original content, make sure you link information you’re referencing to help others that much more!

Queue your posts!!

  • A great way to keep your blog active is to queue your posts. I have my posts queued at 10 each day and try to keep at least 20 posts in my queue at all times, in case a couple of busy days keep me from adding more. Some people unfollow inactive blogs - and this can be a way to prevent it. 
  • The only thing I don’t queue are original posts and asks, but it’s up to you if you decide to use the queue system or not!

➸ advice for a new bullet journalist

Real quick!! I would advise taking a look at the bullet journal’s official website to help understand the basics of bullet journaling. 

  • It’s designed to be quick and customizable way for you to keep information and tasks organized. A great way to make use of this (that I’ve found) is to make a key for each of your logs. You can see my key here. You can also search tumblr for bujo keys to see what others have come up with. If you do want to make a key, make it so that it works for you!  It can be as simple or detailed as you want, with or without signifiers, etc. If you don’t like this system, that’s just fine!

Discover different journal options and where to find them.

  • There is no set journal to use, however there are popular choices among the studyblr community: Moleskine, Leuchtturm1917, and Muji journals - but it is NOT limited to these. Working with a regular notebook works just fine as well! 
  • It’s one thing to find and purchase something online - but I like being able to find what I’m looking for in person. It saves shipping + handling costs, and I get to it immediately. And, sometimes, they can be cheaper too! I found my moleskine journal I’ve been using at Barnes and Noble, and have also seen Leuchtturm1917 journals at my school’s book store. (The temptation is real every time I walk past OTL) 

Your bullet journal is for you, so let’s make it that way.

  • A big part of having a studyblr is to help yourself in becoming more productive in learning and improving a lifestyle (or this may just be how I see it). So! There is no set format for you to use a bullet journal. It’s up to you to figure out what works best for you.
  • You can take inspiration from other people’s post to help experiment with different spreads and layouts. (Be sure to credit/tag if you do! Just to be safe.) 
  • You can find out different things that you can add to your bujo! Habit trackers, daily/weekly/monthly/yearly spreads, lists of things to keep track of (books to read, tv shows and episodes to watch, shopping/wish lists, bucket list, etc), anything you’re interested in. Depending on your interests and areas you wan’t to use a bujo to help you with, this can vary. If you want, you can test out different ideas to see if you like it or not. It will take time to find what you like, so don’t stress about it in the beginning. You’re just starting, after all!
  • There is always something for you to do, it’s just a matter of finding out what that is. If you need any help of finding something to do, feel free to message me! (As long as you don’t mind me asking a bunch of questions haha.)

Don’t be afraid to use pencil first when making your spreads.

  • Me being me, trusted myself to use pen right off the bat. Boy, do I regret that XD It got to the point where I purchased an erasable pen but I’m finding nothing can beat pencil before pen. But before you erase the pencil - make sure the pen has dried. I can’t stress this enough. I’ve gotten impatient multiple times and go ahead to erase, and instantly wished I hadn’t. You can try to find pens that prevent this from happening, but waiting is the best alternative. Something you can do is make a spread at night, and wait to erase when you wake up in the morning. You can keep your bujo open to the page you worked on for it to dry better.

You don’t need any fancy or expensive stationary.

  • Seeing the pastel highlighters, wide variety of pens and miscellaneous tools it’s easy to think you need to have it all but … you don’t have to have any of it. Especially if you are low on funds, don’t worry about getting anything new. Just work with what you have! I have been using pens I’ve owned for years and have hardly touched to see what I can do with them and am pleasantly surprised! I have a bunch of supplies that I have gotten for school that haven’t been used that I plan on finally putting to use. 
  • Your basic school supplies with notebooks, highlighters, pens and pencils, post it notes, can take you as far as you wish!

Having a difficult time coming up with a spread? Here’s some ideas! 

  • Try out different hand written fonts. This can include headers/titles and subheaders/subtitles. Try headers, banners, and dividers too! Here’s some different ideas: x | x | x | x
  • Give your spread a theme. Disney, movie, music, history, art, cartoon shows, books - anything at all! This can help with finding art to fill in blank spaces to give your spread some more interest. Here’s a post with a bunch of ideas you could use.
  • Colors! Try out different color combinations! Being an art student, I’m overly conscious of colors. They can help set a mood, evoke certain emotion, some colors work best with others (be smart when using complimentary colors), etc. Here’s a site that covers basic color theory. But … this is me being nerdy. This can take quite a bit of thought - but you honestly don’t have to (: !! It’s best if you stick to one or two colors within a page not to overwhelm what others are seeing, especially if you’re wanting to keep things minimal. If you want me to go deeper into this, and talk more about contrast and whatnot … I can make a separate post as not to clutter this one ♥
  • Make goals for yourself! This can be included in a habit tracker, but doesn’t need to be. They can be as small as going on a 20 minute walk each day during this week, being sure to stay hydrated, doing something with a family member or friend, completing or starting a big project or assignment, etc. 
  • Find some quotes and add them! Here’s some quote masterposts I’ve come across: x | x | x | x

When taking pictures, be conscious of lighting.

  • The best kind of lighting is natural lighting. Taking pictures outside (or inside) during the day will help your image quality! I know before I said picture quality doesn’t matter much, but this can be a simple and easy way to help improve your posts. 
  • If natural lighting isn’t helping you the way you want, you can take a look at different apps with photo editing capabilities or filters. I have a horrible app finding ability, and just use Photoshop (you can get PS CS2 for free here) or Clip Studio Paint to edit my photos. My favorite tool to use is the tone curve. However you can see this post to look at other options, like apps (it also links to other posts you can look at)!

Have a good time!

  • Honestly, I feel this is what it boils down to. As long as you are enjoying what you’re doing and continue to have a passion for studyblr related content, you’ll succeed. Don’t stress about it and take one post at a time.

I’ll start putting together a post of how I started my studyblr in case that may help as well! Thank you for asking, anon! Hopefully this helps, and that I was able to cover everything! T o T Sorry I kinda went on a bit of a tangent in some areas.

anonymous asked:

Soo I think it's only apt that I ask you now.... Do have any otabek/Yuri fic to recommend? The dirtier the better. No wait, who said that?! (๑• . •๑)

YOU BET YOUR SWEET BISCUITS I DO. (** indicates a personal favorite)

Half a Chance by ratherunnecessary (aka @justanxietyasks) ********

Yuri has never cared about anything as much as he cares about skating. Until, one day, that changes.

Or, Viktor falls in love with Yuuri, Yuuri falls in love with Viktor, Yuri falls in love Yuuri, Otabek falls in love with Yuri, and somehow everything turns out okay.

in flesh and bone by csoru **

After recovering from an injury that cut his previous season short, Yuri makes a comeback with a new coach, a new country of residence, and a relationship upgrade. Still: perfection takes effort.

But I’m Not There Yet by sarahyyy

“Are you not going to read the article?” she asks, flopping onto his bed. “Look who ranked second, just after Phichit Chulanont.”

Otabek reluctantly scrolls down, and oh.

#2 - Yuri Plisetsky

In the embedded Instagram photo just under that subheading, a very grumpy Yuri is cuddling a very grumpy-looking cat. The caption reads: I found the cat version of me at the shelter today. #iknowisaidnomorecats #canyoublameme

(Or, the AU where Otabek and Yuri don’t becomes friends in Barcelona, and there are years of pining.)

Gravity by Fahye **

His Grace the Archduke Yuri Plisetsky wins the Ballistic Grand Tournament in his debut year, at the age of fifteen.

Things go downhill from there.

a slow invasion of the heart by radialarch (aka @radialarch) **

  Yuri Plisetsky does not seduce so much as launch a full-on assault.

i walk my days on a wire by idrilka

“Asia sucked without you,” Yuri admits eventually after a moment, as he falls backwards onto the bed, his t-shirt riding up. It must be still hot in Saint Petersburg, if the forecast is to be believed, but Yuri has the hood up, obscuring his face at this angle. “But we all went back to the hot spring run by Katsuki’s family after the Fukuoka show, so I guess it wasn’t that bad.”

A story of a relationship, told in photographs and Skype calls.

and all he has given me he takes back by verity (aka @ladyofthelog) **

That’s the point of the instructions: Yuri doesn’t have to obey any of them.

hood & glove by Fahye 

“I don’t mess with the fae,” Otabek says.

“I’m not asking you to mess with them,” JJ flat-out lies.

every time I try, every time I win by thissupposedcrime **

At least no one’s brought up couples costumes. Yuri isn’t sure how Otabek would react to a live recording of him leaping over a table to fight a reporter, a symbolic stand in for the death of Yuri’s sanity and Victor’s cutesy legacy. He guesses not well, and that is enough to hold his tongue.

Or, Otabek is naturally romantic, Yuri is naturally clueless, and somehow they work it out.

A Beginner’s Guide To The Dangers Of Making Out With Your Fellow Athletes At Parties by ineptshieldmaid

None of this has anything to do with Otabek, except that Yuri didn’t get Otabek’s number, and so he can’t bitch to him about the whole situation. He makes do with bitching to Mila, who at least agrees that Viktor is impossible to deal with right now.

Otabek keeps liking Yuri’s selfies, but that’s it, that’s the complete and total sum of his communication with Yuri for an entire two weeks. Yuri is not mad about it because there’s nothing to be mad about. They are friends and this, it turns out, is what friends do. Like each other’s selfies and make out at international sporting events. He’s pretty sure Mila’s got at least three friends that fit exactly those parameters.

Grinkov by waldorph **

The 2022 Olympics were Yurio’s to lose.

the signs according to ME, based on what I've absorbed from tumblr even though I don't pay attention to 75% of the zodiac and might not be able to even name them all from memory
  • aries: PISSED OFF ANGRY FILLED WITH RAGE AND ANGER AND IS ALSO MAD
  • taurus: the impression I get is they're similar to aries in that they’re angry and stubborn? but the difference is that while aries will clock you in the jaw, taurus will hold a grudge for the rest of your born days. your born days, not theirs, because they’re going to outlive you out of spite
  • gemini: is what I think comes next? anyway apparently geminis are very social and bubbly and they're people persons (people people?), but also they’re supposed to be all two-faced and gossipy, because twins. which is very mean to say about twins.
  • cancer: no offense to anyone who is a cancer, but my Least Favorite Human that I've ever met is a cancer, so my perception is tainted. cancers cry a lot. all the time. about everything.
  • leo: you know, I honestly don't know what is associated with leo, besides... lion. so therefore, leos are brave. you might belong in august, where dwell the brave of heart. their daring, nerve, and chivalry set leos apart. congrats you're gryffindor now
  • virgo: or is it libra comes first? I think it's virgo. um, anyway, virgo is my moon sign. I respect virgo. the general sense I get is that they're very... anal and particular and organized? their lists are color-coded and have subheadings?
  • libra: or possibly virgo, depending on whether or not I switched the order. BUT YEAH SO, LIBRA, SCALES. ALL ABOUT THAT FAIRNESS AND JUSTICE. common room is next to the kitchen.
  • scorpio: uuuuuuuGHHHHHHHHHHHH I'M SO FED UPPPPPPP I am a scorpio but I don't WANNA BE a scorpio I'm so TIRED of everything being nothing but femme fatale tropes and byronic hero nonsense I'M NOT MYSTERIOUS!!! are people even mysterious in real life? also please stop talking about how sexually charged and passionate I am. please don't do this. you're making this uncomfortable for everyone and I wanna exchange my sign for something else
  • sagittarius: the sense I get is that sagittarius is best personified by a weird kid at summer camp who hardcore believes in aliens and whose knees are full of band-aids
  • capricorn: does capricorn come next? I don't honestly even know. I don't know anything about capricorns. they're represented by a goat though, so that automatically makes them better than every other sign. A MERMAID GOAT, NO LESS. listen, idk what capricorns are like, but I'm trading my star sign. I WANNA BE A MERMAID GOAT. I WANNA BE A MERMAID GOAT MORE THAN ANYTHING.
  • aquarius: the only thing I know about aquarius is that song in Hair
  • pisces: fish. has lots of emotions, but is pretty chill and creative? bunks with sagittarius at summer camp, but personally prefers cryptids to aliens