In Danish the word for “lizard” is “firben (fear-bean)” which translates to “four-legs” and I think it’s funny because that’s probably the least distinctive quality of a lizard.

Submitted by anonymous

20.11.17 // Monday // 13:26
🍁November Diary🍁

Sorry Guys for my absence,
but it’s too much work📖
and I’m a little bit sick🤦🏻‍♀️

Now, I’m sitting on a bed (with old blanket and tissue) and studying for Drug Chemistry presentation, which is tomorrow😒

Honestly, it’s not my favourite subject.

* I’ll answer your messages as soon as possible🌹

Edit: do you like Mondays ? 🤔
🌼🌻study smarter🌻🌼

(here are some study tips straight from my psych notes)

1. interest: the brain prioritizes by meaning, value, and relevance so u remember things better if ur interested

  • find a study partner
  • do extra practice or research
  • teach it to someone else (this works so well!)

2. intent: be actively paying attention. very little learning actually takes place without attention

  • use a concentration check sheet (every time u get distracted, put a check on ur sheet. this is supposed to program ur mind to pay attention)
  • while u read, talk back to the author
  • ask questions during lectures (this is scary ik!! but do it!)

3. basic background: make connections to what u already know

  • preview and skim the material before u read it. or google it!
  • write out a list of vocab words before a lecture and leave some spaces between them to fill in during the lecture
  • read ahead of lectures
  • watch crashcourse tbh

4. selectivity: start by studying whats important

  • look for bolded words, graphics, pictures, chapter review questions in ur readings
  • listen for verbal clues like emphasis and repetition during lectures
  • make urself a study guide as u read and write down questions for urself to answer later as review (kinda like cornell notes)

5. meaningful organization: u can learn/rmr better if u group ideas into diff categories

  • apply vocab words to ur life
  • make flashcards and sort them (try not to have more than seven items in one category!)
  • use mnemonics

6. recitation: saying ideas aloud in ur own words strengthens synaptic connections! when u say something aloud u r forcing urself to pay attention

  • after u read, ask urself questions
  • talk abt what u learned w/ classmates outside of class
  • again, teach someone else

7. visualization: ur brain’s quickest and longest-lasting response is to images

  • convert info into a chart or graph
  • draw it out
  • make a mental video of a process
  • look at picture/video examples

8. association: memory is increased when facts are consciously associated w something u already know. memory = making neural connections

  • ask urself: is this something i already know?

9. consolidation: give ur brain some time to establish a neural pathway

  • make a list of what u remember from class
  • review notes at the end of the day, every day
  • stop after reading each prg to write a question in ur notes
  • make ur own practice quiz

10. distributed practice: we all know cramming doesnt work but we do it anyway! but yeah short and frequent study sections work better

  • make a daily/weekly study schedule
  • create a time budget/time tracker (track everything ur doing for a week and see how u can be more efficient w/ the time u waste)
  • divide the reading/vocab by the number of days before an exam and do a little bit each day (u can use sticky notes to divide ur reading)

other tips:

  • stop stressing! this sounds stupid and it isnt going to be easy, but anxiety causes u to lose focus. try ur best to think positively. sleep a lot. minimize ur caffeine intake. take a walk maybe
  • when u need to remember something, look upward or close ur eyes (when ur eyes are open ur using visual parts of ur brain that u might not need to be using)
  • find a rival! (like the person right above u in class rank) secretly compete w/ them (envy can improve mental persistence bc it makes u focus more intensely) but dont overdo it! 
  • walking and sleeping build memory storage in ur brain
  • eat flavonoids! (grapes, berries, tea leaves, cocoa beans make neurons in the brain more capable of forming new memories + increase blood flow to the brain)
  • obstacles force ur brain to try harder, so space learning lessons apart or create a puzzle to solve or change ur physical setting

In Cree one doesn’t refer to their mother’s sister as “auntie”. Instead we say “nikawîs.” which roughly translates to “like a mother” and I think that’s beautiful.

Submitted by @moon-driver

7

The evolution of my bullet journal in seven pictures. I just filmed a new video, it’s a bullet journal flip through detailing all my tips, set-ups, and decorations. if you want to see it click the link. 

[Bullet Journal Flip Through]

9

A GUIDE TO MAKING EFFECTIVE SLIDES
aka how to create presentation slides that actually improve your presentation

By Eintsein

(apologies for the variation in image quality. idk what went wrong with tumblr)

In Lithuanian we don’t say “octopus”, we say “aštuonkojis” which is literally translates to “eight legs” and I think that’s beautiful.

Submitted by @svajinga-jura

4

Hey guys, since my previous post on Morning Routines was very well received,  I decided to make a night version. This small infographic thingy outlines the things I do at night to prep myself for rest, as well as some other things you could try to ensure you get a good night’s sleep. Hope this helps, and don’t hesitate to drop me an ask if you have any questions!

P.S. the typefaces used are Bromello and Montserrat

2

| May 6, 2017 |
My anxiety is so bad today but I still have to get some work done on my paper about Immanuel Kant. Please give me your best tips for studying with anxiety?
Study hard lovers

3

hey guys - here’s my current desk setup 👩🏼‍💻
featuring my new duck egg clipbook filofax! 📒
i haven’t started using it yet - i have no idea what to put in it 🤷🏼‍♀️
does anyone have any ideas? 🎒

In French we don’t say “love at first sight” we say “un coup de foudre” which literally translates to “a clap of thunder” and that’s the stuff people write novels about.

Submitted by @smilefakerbreathtaker

Note taking tips

Notebook for each class. 

Have a separate notebook for each class. It keeps things organized. Plus, if you keep all of your classes’ notes in the same notebook and you lose that notebook, you’re pretty much SOL. Write clearly. If you’re going to handwrite your notes, make sure you can read them later. PenMANship. It’s got the word “man” in it, so it’s manly. Let go of perfectionism The purpose of note-taking is simple: to help you study better and more quickly. First, what’s new to you? There’s no point in writing down facts you already know. If you already know the Declaration of Independence was written and signed in 1776, there’s no reason to write that down. Anything you know you know you can leave out of your notes. Second, what’s relevant? What information is most likely to be of use later, whether on a test, in an essay, or in completing a project? Focus on points that directly relate to or illustrate your reading (which means you’ll have to have actually done the reading…). The kinds of information to pay special attention to are: 

* Dates of events: Dates allow you to 

  • a) create a chronology, putting things in order according to when they happened, and
  • b) understand the context of an event. For instance, knowing Isaac Newton was born in 1643 allows you to situate his work in relation to that of other physicists who came before and after him, as well as in relation to other trends of the 17th century.

 * Names of people: Being able to associate names with key ideas also helps remember ideas better and, when names come up again, to recognize ties between different ideas whether proposed by the same individuals or by people related in some way.

 * Theories: Any statement of a theory should be recorded — theories are the main points of most classes. 

* Definitions: Like theories, these are the main points and, unless you are positive you already know the definition of a term, should be written down. Keep in mind that many fields use everyday words in ways that are unfamiliar to us. 

 * Arguments and debates: Any list of pros and cons, any critique of a key idea, both sides of any debate related in class or your reading should be recorded. This is the stuff that advancement in every discipline emerges from, and will help you understand both how ideas have changed (and why) but also the process of thought and development within the particular discipline you are studying. 

* Images and exercises: Whenever an image is used to illustrate a point, or when an in-class exercise is performed, a few words are in order to record the experience. Obviously it’s overkill to describe every tiny detail, but a short description of a painting or a short statement about what the class did should be enough to remind you and help reconstruct the experience. 

 * Other stuff: Just about anything a professor writes on a board should probably be written down, unless it’s either self-evident or something you already know. Titles of books, movies, TV series, and other media are usually useful, though they may be irrelevant to the topic at hand; I usually put this sort of stuff in the margin to look up later (it’s often useful for research papers, for example). Pay attention to other student’s comments, too — try to capture at least the gist of comments that add to your understanding. 

* Your own questions: Make sure to record your own questions about the material as they occur to you. This will help you remember to ask the professor or look something up later, as well as prompt you to think through the gaps in your understanding. 

* Note-Taking Techniques: You don’t have to be super-fancy in your note-taking to be effective, but there are a few techniques that seem to work best for most people.

* Outlining: Whether you use Roman numerals or bullet points, outlining is an effective way to capture the hierarchical relationships between ideas and data. In a history class, you might write the name of an important leader, and under it the key events that he or she was involved in. Under each of them, a short description. And so on. Outlining is a great way to take notes from books, because the author has usually organized the material in a fairly effective way, and you can go from start to end of a chapter and simply reproduce that structure in your notes.For lectures, however, outlining has limitations. The relationship between ideas isn’t always hierarchical, and the instructor might jump around a lot. A point later in the lecture might relate better to information earlier in the lecture, leaving you to either 

  • a) flip back and forth to find where the information goes best (and hope there’s still room to write it in) 
  • b) risk losing the relationship between what the professor just said and what she said before. 
 

* Mind-mapping: For lectures, a mind-map might be a more appropriate way of keeping track of the relationships between ideas. Here’s the idea: in the center of a blank sheet of paper, you write the lecture’s main topic. As new sub-topics are introduced (the kind of thing you’d create a new heading for in an outline), you draw a branch outward from the center and write the sub-topic along the branch. Then each point under that heading gets its own, smaller branch off the main one. When another new sub-topic is mentioned, you draw a new main branch from the center. And so on. The thing is, if a point should go under the first heading but you’re on the fourth heading, you can easily just draw it in on the first branch. Likewise, if a point connects to two different ideas, you can connect it to two different branches. If you want to neaten things up later, you can re-draw the map or type it up 

 * The Cornell System: The Cornell System is a simple but powerful system for increasing your recall and the usefulness of your notes. About a quarter of the way from the bottom of a sheet of paper, draw a line across the width of the page. Draw another line from that line to the top, about 2 inches (5 cm) from the right-hand edge of the sheet. You’ve divided your page into three sections. In the largest section, you take notes normally — you can outline or mind-map or whatever. After the lecture, write a series of “cues” into the skinny column on the right, questions about the material you’ve just taken notes on. This will help you process the information from the lecture or reading, as well as providing a handy study tool when exams come along: simply cover the main section and try to answer the questions. In the bottom section, you write a short, 2-3 line summary in your own words of the material you’ve covered. Again, this helps you process the information by forcing you to use it in a new way; it also provides a useful reference when you’re trying to find something in your notes later. Charting Method If your professor’s lecture will be focused on comparing and contrasting two or more ideas, you might consider using the charting method. Create a table in the note-taking program you’re using. Make as many columns as there are categories that you’re comparing and contrasting. Label each column with a category. As you listen to the lecture, record the notes under the appropriate category.