studio museum

Last summer, our photography team hit the road to capture brand new images of over a dozen of Louis C. Tiffany’s mosaics still located in their original architectural settings for our exhibition, “Tiffany’s Glass Mosaics.” Here, the team is setting up to photograph “The Dream Garden” at the Curtis Center in Philadelphia. Thanks to their skillful lighting and photography, these works can be appreciated with a level of detail you might not notice if you see them in person.  Come see the hard work of the photography team in the exhibition’s “Mosaic Theater.”

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“We The People of the Diaspora-Black Culture Exploration” Fashion Illustration Series by Jamilla Okubo (me)


                                                                                                                                                                   


 


 

Glenn Ligon, Give us a Poem (Palindrome #2), 2007

“Glenn Ligon made this neon piece […] in 2007, and I saw it a little while back on the wall of the Studio Museum in Harlem, where it’s part of the permanent collection. The work is built around an incident that occurred at Harvard in 1975, when Muhammad Ali had just finished a speech and a student in the audience asked him to improvise a poem: ‘Me/We’ was the pithy verse Ali offered. Even then, at the height of the Black Power movement, it was an intriguingly opaque statement that could have been read as a gesture of solidarity between the black boxer and his white audience, or as an underlining of their difference. In Ligon’s work, the two words become a visual palindrome, of sorts – symmetrical top and bottom – and alternate being lit (white) and unlit (black), which just increases the tension inherent in them. In 2014, in a museum in Harlem, it strikes me that the tension is between the artist and the audience he addresses – with the issue of race still there, but now wrapped up in larger issues of aesthetic communities and the class, and color, they imply." Blake Gopnik, The Daily Pic

According to scholars, one in four cowboys in Texas during the golden age of westward expansion was black; many others were Mexican, mestizo, or Native American—a far more diverse group than Hollywood stereotypes would suggest.

The photos in an exciting new exhibit, “Black Cowboy,” at the Studio Museum in Harlem, suggest that that many common conceptions of what an iconic American looks like are wrong. Read more about the exhibit, and see more photos here. 

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Howl Jenkins Pendragon is a powerful wizard living in the land of Ingary. Originally Howell Jenkins of Wales, he was part of a loose fraternity of wizards on Earth.  He owns a moving castle, and spreads rumors about himself to retain his privacy, opting to be alone and hiding from all conflict.

David Hammons (b. 1943) is an African-American artist from New York City. Among his works, which are often inspired by the civil rights and Black Power movements, one of the best known is the “African American Flag”, which he designed in 1990 by recoloring the U.S. national flag in the Garvey colors (red, black, and green of the Pan-African flag). The flag is a part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and a copy is hoisted at the entrance to the Studio Museum in Harlem, a New York museum devoted to the art of African-Americans.

shaikha-r  asked:

Hi, can you please enlighten me on that whole Studio Ghibli closing thing? And Miyazaki's retirement? Like Is he retired now? And is Studio Ghibli closed forever? And what about this "new Ghibli studio" called Studio Ponoc? Too many questions sorry lol and thank you for this amazing blog.

Studio Ghibli has never been closed, but Hayao Miyazaki had officially announced his retirement in 2013 after the release of The Wind Rises. That said, he also retired after the release of Princess Mononoke in 1997, and then went on to make Spirited Away. Hayao Miyazaki has work ethic and animation in every fibre of his being, he will never sit still and retire, no matter how often he announces it. Only one thing will retire him from his work, and hopefully not for decades to come.

Last year he started work on a short film that was to be shown exclusively at the Studio Ghibli Museum, called Boro the Caterpillar. But it seems that Hayao Miyazaki was unhappy with the short length of the film, and has decided to make it in to a full feature length movie, expected to be released in 2019.

Studio Ponoc is a new animation studio, comprised of animators that used to work for Studio Ghibli. Their first release, Mary and the Witch’s Flower, is directed by Hiromasa Yonebayashi, who had directed The Borrower Arrietty and When Marnie was There for Studio Ghibli. Animators need to pay their bills and feed their families, and they can’t sit on their hands for years on end while Studio Ghibli stagnates. So that is why we have Studio Ponoc.

I hope that answers everything ^____^ If you have any more questions, feel free to ask. I don’t get many asks these days. xoxox