studio museum

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“We The People of the Diaspora-Black Culture Exploration” Fashion Illustration Series by Jamilla Okubo (me)


                                                                                                                                                                   


 


 

Glenn Ligon, Give us a Poem (Palindrome #2), 2007

“Glenn Ligon made this neon piece […] in 2007, and I saw it a little while back on the wall of the Studio Museum in Harlem, where it’s part of the permanent collection. The work is built around an incident that occurred at Harvard in 1975, when Muhammad Ali had just finished a speech and a student in the audience asked him to improvise a poem: ‘Me/We’ was the pithy verse Ali offered. Even then, at the height of the Black Power movement, it was an intriguingly opaque statement that could have been read as a gesture of solidarity between the black boxer and his white audience, or as an underlining of their difference. In Ligon’s work, the two words become a visual palindrome, of sorts – symmetrical top and bottom – and alternate being lit (white) and unlit (black), which just increases the tension inherent in them. In 2014, in a museum in Harlem, it strikes me that the tension is between the artist and the audience he addresses – with the issue of race still there, but now wrapped up in larger issues of aesthetic communities and the class, and color, they imply." Blake Gopnik, The Daily Pic

According to scholars, one in four cowboys in Texas during the golden age of westward expansion was black; many others were Mexican, mestizo, or Native American—a far more diverse group than Hollywood stereotypes would suggest.

The photos in an exciting new exhibit, “Black Cowboy,” at the Studio Museum in Harlem, suggest that that many common conceptions of what an iconic American looks like are wrong. Read more about the exhibit, and see more photos here. 

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It seems that I forgot to post this here…

This is something I wanted to do for a long time - I used the Holbein watercolour tubes I had, added some colours, mixed some and re-created the set of colours recommended by Hayao Miyazaki. This is based on the first (old) edition of the 24 colour set that was being sold in Studio Ghibli’s museum in Mitaka (some colours got discontinued by Holbein though so you can not buy it any more). I will be painting an illustration using this set in another video.

The list of colours (including the ones requiring mixing)

1. Crimson Lake
2. Opera
3. Vermilion
4. Yellow Ocher
5. Permanent Yellow Lemon
6. Permanent Yellow Deep
7. Permanent Yellow Orange
8. Permanent Green No.1
9. Permanent Green No.3 
made from Sap Green W075    4:1   Yellow Ochre W034
10. Cadmium Green Deep
11. Cobalt Green Yellow Shade 
made from   Permanent Green No.2  W067     3:1   Viridian (hue) W061
12. Cobalt Blue Hue
13. Cerulean Blue
14. Ultramarine Deep
15. Compose Blue
16. Prussian Blue
17. Bright Violet
18. Light Red
19. Burnt Umber
20. Burnt Sienna
21. Ivory Black
22. Yellow Grey
23. Violet Grey 
made from    W025 Brilliant Pink     9:1    W120 Quinacridone Violet
24. Davis Grey

Works of Hayao Miyazaki © Studio Ghibli used for educational purposes  only

3

Howl Jenkins Pendragon is a powerful wizard living in the land of Ingary. Originally Howell Jenkins of Wales, he was part of a loose fraternity of wizards on Earth.  He owns a moving castle, and spreads rumors about himself to retain his privacy, opting to be alone and hiding from all conflict.

David Hammons (b. 1943) is an African-American artist from New York City. Among his works, which are often inspired by the civil rights and Black Power movements, one of the best known is the “African American Flag”, which he designed in 1990 by recoloring the U.S. national flag in the Garvey colors (red, black, and green of the Pan-African flag). The flag is a part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and a copy is hoisted at the entrance to the Studio Museum in Harlem, a New York museum devoted to the art of African-Americans.