students free

Made a set of simple printables, because I was missing some things before the start of the school year. 

HABIT TRACKER:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0G5JxeNcPPZemdlRUNGTHFCNk0/view?usp=sharing

THIS WEEK:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0G5JxeNcPPZS08xZlZhRmp1WWc/view?usp=sharing

MEAL PLANNER:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0G5JxeNcPPZYTRvNFFiTW8xLVk/view?usp=sharing

THIS MONTH:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0G5JxeNcPPZc3RnQ2ZLS05GMmM/view?usp=sharing

once my private instructor actually said to me “don’t let poor students play oboe or bassoon. They’ll never be any good because they won’t be able to afford reeds, lessons, or good instruments, and you’ll be wasting your time even if they can pay you for lessons.”

so I’ve made a point to give my students handmade reeds for free and I loan them books that I buy and I will never call a poor student a waste of my time because they are not.

Classical instrument asks!

1. What is your instrument’s full name?
2. When did you get your instrument?
3. What brand and model is it?
4. Is it a he, she, or somewhere in between?
5. What made you choose that instrument?
6. Favourite thing about your instrument?
7. Least favourite thing about your instrument?
8. What accent would your instrument have if it could talk?
9. Three adjectives to describe your instrument’s personality.
10. What classical song best describes your instrument?
11. What non classical song best describes your instrument?
12. Finish this sentence: “my instrument and I are like______”
13. Why did you name your instrument that?
14. What is your instrument’s aesthetic?
15. If your instrument could go shopping at the mall, where would it shop?
16. What musical era best suits your instrument?
17. What is the most damage that has been done to your instrument?
18. Write a letter to your instrument!
19. If your instrument was a character on “The Office”, who would they be?
20. What similarities do you and your instrument share?

3

I’ve been waiting a long time for a major political party in Canada to push for free university tuition & debt relief. Glad to finally see some movement in this direction from the NDP.

Student debt, while not quite as severe as in the USA, is a serious problem for my generation. I’m almost $30,000 in debt, and that’s likely going to rise before I graduate.

Tips for Surviving College (With a Mental Illness)

Don’t compare yourself to other students. Just don’t do it. Because of your mental health, there will always be things that are more difficult for you than other students. Waking up early, keeping track of assignments, staying focused and motivated, socializing outside of class, joining clubs. All of these are things that can be harder for students with mental illness. It’s important to just pay attention to yourself and make sure you’re meeting the goals you set for yourself.

Walk as much as you can. Go for short walks around campus, walk to class instead of taking the bus or driving, walk around the library in between studying. Just get up and walk. It’s important to get in exercise where you can and walking is a great way to boost endorphins.

Know the attendance policy for each of your classes. Within the first week of class try to figure out how each professor takes attendance. Is it at the beginning of class, end of class? Is there a seating chart (seriously) or is it just writing in your name? Is there a daily quiz? Perfect attendance isn’t always attainable so it’s important to know not only how many days you can miss or be late, but how you can get around that. If you’re just having a bad mental health day it’s good to know when you can get a friend to sign you in so you don’t lose attendance points.

Have a “backup buddy” in each of your classes. On the first day of class or at least before the first test, make sure you get the phone number and email of two classmates. Not only is it good to meet new people, these are the people who will be your lifeline. Did you miss class or just completely zone out and need the notes? Do you need someone to sign you in? Did you abandon your bullet journal and forget all of the due dates? It’s crucial that you have TWO people you can reach (in case one or the other can’t help you) when you have a question you can’t ask your professor.

Know your professors!!! Introduce yourself first day of class (so it can be short and sweet) or go during office hours (so there aren’t a lot of people). Professors are a lot more willing to help you out if you’ve at least tried to establish a relationship with them. You’ll be closer with some more than others but if you ever have to send out a panicked email it’s important your professor can put a face to the name. If you ever have an emergency and need an extension it’s a lot more likely to get one this way. Bonus: also get to know your TA or GA if they’re the ones grading your assignments.

Take your medicine, see your therapist/psychiatrist. College is too stressful to go without the medical treatment that you need. If you can’t afford treatment, most universities have counseling clinics where you can get free or cheap treatment from grad students. Many university health centers also have psychiatrists you can see cheaply. At my university I see a grad student LPC for free and get to see a psychiatrist for $10 an appointment. Your therapist can also write letters in case your professor or school needs proof of treatment or anything like that.

Register with your school’s disability services. I’ve met a lot of students with depression or anxiety who had no idea that disability could apply to them. Mental illness is a disability! Registering with Disability is invaluable. You can get access to tutoring, support groups, peer mentors, and most importantly: accommodations. If you get really bad test anxiety you can arrange to take your test privately either proctored by someone in disability services or in your professor’s office. Extensions can sometimes be made for assignments in case you have an emergency like a panic attack or other life disrupting episode. 

Whether you need accommodation or not, I strongly urge you to register with disability in case something happens. If you need to drop your classes or were unable to and end up failing because of your health, being registered with disability can mean your bad semester can be “forgiven,” essentially meaning you can go on medical leave.

Have a family member or friend for a support system. Outside of your therapist or DS, have someone who you can vent to. Have someone to buy you ice cream and tell you everything is going to be okay. Have someone who can tell you you’re beautiful and perfect the way you are, whether that’s your mom or even someone on tumblr. There are people all around who care about you.

Know that you are wonderful and brave and have already accomplished so much just by getting into college. About 1 in 4 adults have a mental illness: you are not alone. Even if it might feel like you’re the only one having a hard time, there are hundreds of students all around you going through the same thing. 

Tips To Make Your College Experience Cheaper

Textbook websites

  • List of websites where you can find free ebooks, specified by subject.
  • Slugbooks.com (to compare textbook prices)
  • Thriftbooks.com  
  • Bigwords.com (price comparison)
  • Chegg.com
  • Abebooks.com (offers textbook editions, like unbound ones, that are cheaper than retailers)
  • directtextbooks.com
  • studentbooktrades.com
  • Bookrenter.com (shipping is free, as well as the shipping back to the warehouse)
  • gutenberg.org (free e-books)
  • campusbooks.com
  • textbooks.com
  • Allbookstores.com (searching shows the lowest price for a book)
  • textbookrecycling.com
  • bookscouter.com (find the highest buy back site for a book)
  • ecampus.com
  • bookbyte.com
  • bookdepository.com (Good for English majors, discounted books shipped around the world)
  • gen.lib.rus.ec (free digital copies of books)
  • HERE is a huge list of textbook PDFs.

Textbook tips

  • ALWAYS check to see if textbook websites have online coupons. Check outside websites like RetailMeNot.com but also sign up for their email listing. They often send you a coupon for just signing up and will continually send you other coupon deals.
  • Amazon has good deals on books sometimes and they offer college students temporary free membership. Here’s a link explaining some of the details.
  • Amazon and other retailers, like Barnes and Noble also offer textbook rental. You get the book for a certain amount of time (30 days, 60 days, 90 days, etc., then mail it back to them.) Much cheaper than buying.
  • Some professors put textbooks on reserve in the library so you can check them out for an hour or two instead of actually buying them.
  • If your class textbooks are at the library and you need them for longer than allowed, you can always photocopy them.
  • Look for Facebook pages/groups with your school name and year, people are always posting online to get rid of their textbooks.
  • If your books are older/literature type books they are often available as e-books for free or easy to find at used bookstore or thrift stores.
  • Ask your professor after hours if you can borrow and make copies of the class textbook.
  • Many colleges use the Link+ library sharing program or something similar. If the textbook you need isn’t offered in the library, another school within the program can deliver the book for free. Ask you school’s librarians about it.
  • If you have a class that requires a “reader,” which is just a bunch of articles, you can usually find them at the school library or online.
  • Keep your textbooks in the best condition possible, so they sell for higher when you no longer need them.
  • If you can access your class list and the emails of your classmates early, ask if anyone would like to share a textbook. Split the price and share it or just ask to copy the chapters needed.

General tips

  • If you get financial aid, set it up to deposit into your own checking account because FAFSA ATMs are frustrating.
  • Check out the dollar stores for some college supplies. They have pens, notebooks, planners, etc.
  • Find upperclassmen who are moving out of their dorms/apartments, they often sell/give away items they are no longer going to be using.
  • Find out if your department offers free printing to undergrads. If yours doesn’t, find a friend whose department does.
  • Pretty much every school offers a MS Office license to students for free. It may not be well advertised but make sure to find out before paying for the programs on your own.
  • Bulk supply stores are usually cheaper.
  • Use your phone’s planner and alerts for assignments.
  • If you need energy boosts, it’s definitely cheaper to brew your own coffee and tea, then use a travel mug. But if you need to go to places like Starbucks, sign up for the Starbucks card so you can get free refills on certain items and get discounts for members only.
  • Find out what free courses your school offers and go to them instead of paying for a tutor.
  • At many universities there are conferences and talks almost daily, which often offer free lunches and dinners.
  • Some colleges offer free cab services so make sure to look into that.
  • Most school health care places give out free condoms and they are often given out at events too.
  • Besides math, older editions of textbooks are usually just fine and much cheaper.
  • Thrift stores are great if you need items for your dorm or apartment, they have appliances and offer testing areas in a section of the store.
  • Specific to Seattle: There’s a place called Seattle ReCreative and you can get school supplies for extremely cheap.
  • Check when stores offer back to school sales and get supplies then for cheaper than usual.
  • Get your syllabus as soon as possible so you can photocopy all the needed pages in textbooks.
  • Look for websites that offer similar information in the textbook, sometimes it’s explained better online, gives examples, or just generally better worded.
  • Buy school supplies during tax-free weekend.
  • Apply for as many local scholarships as possible and do it every year in college, not just freshman year.
  • Ask absolutely every place you go if they offer student discounts. Many places don’t advertise this, but will offer some kind of discount if you show your student ID.
  • Find out if your school has assistance options for lower income students.
  • HERE is a list of food budget tips, recipes, and websites to help.
  • Some classes have extra fees for whatever reason, for example they will charge more if certain equipment will be used. If it’s not a course you need, sometimes it’s better to find cheaper elective classes.
  • Consider community college to save money, and then transfer to a 4 year school. Or attend community college classes during the summer but make sure to always check if the credits transfer.
  • If you need to use a credit card, try to get on with cash back rewards. Also check which banks offer perks for students, like free checking or a no-free policy for low minimum balances.
  • Check out your college newspaper and signs around campus. You will often find information about free events or find coupons with discounts on near by businesses.
  • School supplies that don’t sell at stores like Walmart and Target are extremely discounted during the last week of August.
  • Always check if stores price check.

New Democratic Party (NDP) leader candidates policies on Post Secondary Education to date. In case this post goes viral and Americans are confused, the NDP is Canada’s major left political party and they’re choosing a new leader this fall.

This is accurate to the best of my knowledge (as I spent a lot of time reading over the NDP leadership candidates).

Reminder that if you want to choose the NDP’s next leader, you must buy a membership before August 17th.

Self-Care for Students

I am making this post because I have been demonstrating atrocious self-care. Well, I haven’t really been doing any self-care at all. So, for that reason, I am making this post to not only help myself but help other students as well—because I know I’m not the only one out there working non-stop and not taking time for myself!


Time Management

You may be wondering–how does time management fit into self-care? Time management has everything to do with self-care. If you don’t have good time management, then you are probably:

a) losing sleep to complete assignments

b) skipping meals to study

c) not taking time to just relax and de-stress

Make sure you are keeping track of your syllabuses and make sure you have enough time to complete each assignment.

Make appointments to relax whether that be alone, with friends, your s/o(s), or family.


School/College/University Counselor

If you are dealing with stress, anxiety, or depression, make sure you are taking care of your mental health!!! I can’t stress this enough!! Your mental and physical health comes first. If you are struggling with either, how can you be successful in your studies? Your well-being matters and you deserve to have some peace of mind during your school year.

Reach to out and take advantage of the resources that your school offers. Most schools should have a therapist/counselor on campus. If you don’t know how to see a counselor, ask around. This can be a good option for those who cannot afford therapy and/or do not have the time to go to a therapist outside of school!


Exercise and eat healthy

This is something that easier said than done. This is something that I am working on as well. My university has a gym, and I always try my best to get there, but the past few weeks of school have just been so busy and I haven’t had the chance to go.

This may be hard, but try your best to get exercise, even if it is only ten minutes. Even if it’s going for a short jog or running on the treadmill for a bit at the gym. Exercising has been proven to help with depression and stress. It’s also an important part of your overall health.

Many college students are familiar with the struggle to find affordable and healthy food. My university’s cafeteria in my school is ridiculously expensive and I bring a lunch every day. I commute so I am not familiar with things you could do if you are living on campus. If you have any times for dorm students, please feel free to add them!

I can make a post in the future about affordable food for college students.


Treat yo’ self!

That’s right! You heard me! Last week I went up to Chinatown and bought myself and lychee crepe—because I’m worth it (I’m working on building my poor self-esteem—I’ll make a post about that later). Celebrate your success by doing little things for yourself. It doesn’t need to be big. It could be taking a nice bath, go to a movie, hang out with a friend, etc. Going to school can be stressful and it’s important to take some time to do fun things for yourself. You work so hard! You deserve it!


This is by no means an exhaustive list. Please add anything that you feel is important for self-care for students!

Evidence for Shiro being an instructor at the Garrison

  • Lance calls him a “senior officer” once.
  • Keith refers to Shiro as “sir” (though rarely).
  • He wears a different uniform from the paladins.
  • He quickly takes a leadership role in Voltron.

Evidence against Shiro being an instructor at the Garrison

  • He does not have to be a non-student to participate in the Kerberos mission, seeing as Matt wears a student uniform.
  • If Matt had been in Shiro’s place wouldn’t he have taken a leadership role too, even though he’s a student?
  • Keith and Shiro know each other “very well” and are sort of “touchy” (the shoulder thing, playful shove) which isn’t typical of most student-teacher relationships.
  • Keith said Shiro was “like a brother” (a weird thing to say about a teacher).
  • Hunk did not know who Shiro was and the other paladins only knew him vaguely.
  • The title of “senior officer” is especially dubious, it has multiple meanings and we can’t be sure what VLD implies. The most we can safely take from it is that Shiro is a higher rank than “cadet” like the paladins - not necessarily their teacher.
  • The paladins refer to Shiro using his first name and a nickname (in Japanese standards) but refer to teachers using their second name (”Professor Montgomery”, “Iverson”) suggesting a degree of informality despite not knowing Shiro well.
  • Shiro is only “slightly older” than the paladins.
  • One interview before VLD was released referred to Shiro as a “student [from their class]”
  • The paladins have never mentioned that Shiro was an instructor.

anonymous asked:

Student 1: "Are you sure you like girls? Are you sure it's not just a phase?" Student 2: "No I'm not sure. It's a Thursday and I'm not sure of anything on Thursdays. Only fools who want to get taken are sure on Thursdays. It's why not a single professor will schedule an exam on Thursdays. So, are you sure you want to ask that question?"

oh thursdays we wear c r u s h i n g  u n c e r t a i n t y