student strike quebec

On This Day: May 17

International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia

  • 1649: Levellers, Thompson, Perkins and Church shot in Burford, England for mutiny, on Oliver Cromwell’s orders.
  • 1838: First Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women held in Philadelphia.
  • 1917: Thomas Mooney had his execution stayed pending appeal.
  • 1919: Winnipeg General Strike: Strike committee votes to permit resumption of bread and milk shipments.
  • 1919: Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom formally established in Zurich.
  • 1940: Emma Goldman was buried in Waldheim Cemetery in Chicago.
  • 1947: US President Truman ends nationwide railroad strike with threats to take over the railroads and send in the army.
  • 1957: The Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom in Washington, DC is at the time the largest nonviolent demonstration for civil rights.
  • 1961: Nashville students, coordinated by Diane Nash, John Lewis, and James Bevel, take up the Freedom Ride, signaling the increased involvement of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).
  • 1968: Among others, Philip and Daniel Berrigan raided a draft board office in Catonsville, Maryland, burning over 600 draft files.
  • 1968: Over 200,000 workers on strike in France as part of a general strike.
  • 1968: Thousands of students march for second day in a row from Sorbonne to Renault works despite trade union leaders’ opposition.
  • 1992: “Black May” events begin in Thailand as 200,000 people protest in Bangkok against the military regime.
  • 2004: Marcia Kadish and Tanya McCloskey become first legally married same-sex partners in the US.
  • 2007: Baristas at an East Grand Rapids, Michigan, Starbucks announce their membership in IWW Starbucks Workers Union.
  • 2012: Quebec Student Strike: Government tables special legislation. It includes severe financial penalties for people blocking schools along with rules about how to protest. Protesters must inform police of their plans eight hours in advance, and police have the right to move a protest location.
  • 2013: An anti-homophobic rally was held in Tbilisi, Georgia. the rally were met by thousands of protestors opposing homosexuality, who were allowed to break through a police cordon and violently pursued them, beating and throwing stones at them. The rally was the first officially sanctioned anti-homophobic demonstration held in Georgia.
On This Day: May 31
  • 1905: Anarchist Alexander Farras threw a bomb into a procession led by the French President Émile Loubet and Alfonso XIII of Spain, failing to harm either.
  • 1906: Catalan anarchist Mateu Morral threw a bomb in a bouquet at Alfonso XIII of Spain during his wedding, but Alfoson once again avoided harm.
  • 1909: The National Negro Committee, forerunner of National Association for the Advancement of Colored People convened for first time.
  • 1910: Emma Goldman and Ben Reitman were struck by a train while driving in Spokane, Washington.
  • 1918: Spanish anarcho-syndicalist Juan Portales Casamar is born in Zahínos, Spain. He was a active CNT militant and fought in the Spanish Civil War.
  • 1921: The Tulsa Race Riot takes place. Whites attack black area, leaving 10,000 homeless and perhaps 300 dead.
  • 1921: Trial of anarchists Sacco and Vanzetti begins in Massachusetts.
  • 1940: Among others, Rudolf Rocker and Carlo Tresca spoke at a memorial for Emma Goldman.
  • 1955: US Supreme Court orders schools integration “with all deliberate speed” in the wake of Brown v Board of Education of Topeka.
  • 1957: Playwright Arthur Miller convicted of contempt of Congress for refusing to reveal names of those alleged to be Communists.
  • 1966: Nguyen Thi Can, 17 year old Buddhist woman, commits suicide by self-immolation in Hue, Vietnam, over the war.
  • 1971: US military personnel in London petition at US Embassy against the Vietnam War.
  • 1982: Canadian anarchists Direct Action blew up a BC Hydro power substation.
  • 1984: Approximately 3200 police in riot gear at Orgreave from 13 area police forces force major confrontation with unarmed strikers.
  • 1986: Tiananmen Square demonstrations start their 18th day with 100,000 demonstrating in the square.
  • 1997: Rose Will Monroe, aka Rosie the Riveter, dies in Clarksville, IN.
  • 2000: Teachers protesting for better wages and education reform burn pamphlets near Los Pinos presidential home in Mexico City.
  • 2010: Israeli commandos board ships trying to break the ongoing blockade of the Gaza Strip, and kill nine civilians.
  • 2011: The National Movement of Kurdish Parties in Syria, a coalition of Syria’s 12 Kurdish parties, boycotted a Syrian opposition summit in Antalya, Turkey.
  • 2012: Quebec Student Strike: The Quebec government stated that it was pulling out of talks meant to end the protest after four days of negotiations with student leaders, without having reached a stable consensus. By that day, more than 150,000 students were estimated to be on strike.
On This Day: May 16
  • 1717: Voltaire imprisoned in the Bastille for writing subversive satire.
  • 1792: Denmark becomes first country to outlaw the slave trade.
  • 1838: Grimké Riot in Philadelphia. Abolitionist and feminist Angelina Grimké addressed a crowd at Pennsylvania Hall, in Philadelphia, her last public speech. While she spoke, thousands gathered to protest, and attacked the hall.
  • 1871: Paris Commune: The Vendôme Column, a symbol of militarism, is pulled down.
  • 1887: Maria Lacerda de Moura was born in Manhuaçu, Minas Gerais, Brazil. She was an anarcha-feminist, individualist anarchist, teacher, journalist, and writer.
  • 1898: Start of fourteen-week long Woodworkers Strike in Oshkosh, Wisconsin.
  • 1901: French anarchist Gustave Lefrançais died.
  • 1904: The United States Supreme Court upheld the deportation of British anarchist John Turner for violation of the Anarchist Exclusion Act.
  • 1909: Mexican anarchist Ricardo Flores Magón was imprisoned for 18 months.
  • 1915: New York City’s Modern School moved to Stelton, New Jersey.
  • 1918: US Congress passes Sedition Act to forbid negative speaking of US govt/military. Unionists, anarchists and communists arrested.
  • 1926: Several hours after Sacco and Vanzetti’s death sentence was announced, anarchist Severino Di Giovanni bombed the U.S. embassy in Buenos Aires, destroying the front of the building.
  • 1933: Individualist anarchist John Henry Mackay died of a heart attack.
  • 1934: Minneapolis General Strike begins, following Teamsters’ strike against trucking companies in the city.
  • 1938: US Supreme Court issues Mackay decision allowing employers to “permanently replace” – fire – striking workers.
  • 1943: Warsaw Ghetto resistance finally crushed by Nazis. Over 56,000 died in the fighting.
  • 1944: An uprising by Sinti and Roma in Auschwitz-Birkenau camp led SS to temporarily interrupt the gassing of Sinti and Roma.
  • 1968: In France, workers had occupied roughly fifty factories. Over 200,000 are on strike at this point.
  • 1979: Death of A Philip Randolph in New York City. He was president and founder of Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters. First black-led union recognised by the AFL
  • 1981: Irish Republican Francis Hughes dies after 59 days on hunger strike, fighting for recognition as political prisoners.
  • 1998: Tens of thousands form human chain with Jubilee 2000 around G7 summit meeting in Birmingham, UK demanding debt relief for Third World.
  • 2003: Iraqi Federation of Trade Unions formed.
  • 2012: Quebec Student Strike: Protesters, many covering their faces with masks, storm into a university and move through hallways in pursuit of classes to disrupt.
On This Day: May 10

Asian American Pacific Islander Mental Health Awareness Day

  • 1857: The Indian Rebellion begins as troops mutiny in the town of Meerut, quickly spreading across the region.
  • 1866: American Equal Rights Association Founded.
  • 1887: Albert “Ginger” Goodwin born in Treeton, United Kingdom. He was a coal miner activist for workers’ rights. His death inspired 1918 Vancouver general strike.
  • 1905: Oscar Wilde’s play Salome opened.
  • 1920: Dock workers in England refuse to coal the Jolly George, loaded with arms to be used against Revolutionary Russia.
  • 1926: British General Strike: PM Baldwin declares that Britain’s ‘threatened with a revolution’; government arrests 374 Communists.
  • 1926: British General Strike: The Flying Scotsman derailed by strikers in Northumberland.
  • 1967: Captain Dr Howard Levy, imprisoned for 3 years for refusing to train soldiers for Vietnam. He considered it a violation of his medical ethics.
  • 1968: Léo Ferré composed his song The Anarchists during the events of May 1968 in France.
  • 1968: The Night of the Barricades in Paris as student protesters battle police.
  • 1971: Attorney General John N. Mitchell compares the anti-war protesters to Nazis.
  • 1980: 20,000 march in a funeral procession for slain Protesters in San Salvador, El Salvador.
  • 1980: National Organization for Women (NOW) organizes 85,000 in Chicago to march for Illinois to ratify Equal Rights Amendment.
  • 2008: Skorpion Zinc strike in Namibia begins at Africa’s largest mine.
  • 2012: Quebec Student Strike: Smoke bombs set off at various points on the Montreal metro system during the morning rush hour, disrupting subway service on a rainy morning. Four people arrested and detained for days. Supporters hold demonstration at Montreal courthouse.
On This Day: May 21
  • 1851: Slavery is abolished in Colombia.
  • 1856: Stonemasons in Victoria, Australia, win the first 8-hour working day.
  • 1869: Anarchist and journalist Hutchins Hapgood was born in Chicago.
  • 1871: Paris Commune: The “Bloody Week” of suppression of the Paris Commune began.
  • 1894: French anarchist Émile Henry was executed by guillotine.
  • 1894: Two anarchists were executed for bombing the Gran Teatre del Liceu in Barcelona, Spain, but were later exonerated.
  • 1916: Enrique and Ricardo Flores Magón were arrested in Los Angeles, California.
  • 1930: Arrest of Sarojini Naidu, Indian poet, as leader of the nonviolent protest on Dharasana Salt Works.
  • 1933: All political parties, other than the Nazis are banned in Germany by Adolf Hitler’s regime.
  • 1934: Minneapolis General Strike begins following ongoing strike by Teamsters Union: battle between strikers and bosses’ hired thugs.
  • 1935: Jane Addams dies in Chicago. Peace and women’s rights activist who founded “settlement houses” for Chicago’s immigrant families, also a Nobel laureate.
  • 1945: “Little Wagner Act” signed in Hawaii guaranteeing collective bargaining rights for pineapple and sugar workers.
  • 1961: MLK, the Freedom Riders, and congregation of 1,500 at Rev. Ralph Abernathy’s First Baptist Church in Montgomery are besieged by mob of segregationists.
  • 1965: Vietnam Day Committee organized large teach-in at UC Berkeley. 10-30,000 attend.
  • 1969: 1969 Greensboro uprising: student protesters battle police for five days on campus of North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University; one student killed May 22. National Guard assault the campus using tear gas, even dropping it by helicopter.
  • 1969: Police in Rosario, Argentina kill a 15 yr old student Luis Blanco during protest. Begins period of unrest known as Rosariazo.
  • 1970: 5,000 National Guard troops occupy Ohio State University following violence.
  • 1972: 15,000 demonstrate in Washington against the war.
  • 1979: White Night riots: In San Francisco, a riot erupts over “hand slap” sentence given to murderer of Harvey Milk, the city’s first openly gay supervisor.
  • 1981: Irish Republican hunger striker Patsy O'Hara dies in the Maze prison after 61 days on hunger strike.
  • 1998: President Suharto of Indonesia resigns following killing of students by security forces and mass protests against his corrupt rule.
  • 2012: Quebec Student Strike: Huge nightly protests continue during Victoria Day weekend. C.L.A.S.S.E. group takes tougher stand on the special law, announcing plans to defy it.
On This Day: May 24

International Women’s Day for Disarmament

  • 1798: The United Irishmen Movement begins against British rule, influenced by French and American revolutions.
  • 1856: Pottawatomie Massacre - John Brown and supporters kill five pro-slavery settlers in Kansas part of violent runup to Civil War.
  • 1894: Cripple Creek miners’ strike begins in Cripple Creek, Colorado.
  • 1906: British suffragist Dora Montefiore refuses to pay taxes and barricades house against bailiffs in protesting for women’s vote.
  • 1917: Mass anti-conscription protests in Montreal’s Victory Square.
  • 1918: All Canadian women over 21 win the right to vote in federal elections regardless of whether they can vote provincially.
  • 1921: The trial of Sacco and Vanzetti began.
  • 1940: Stalinist agents attempt to assassinate Leon Trotsky in Mexico for the first time.
  • 1949: UAW labour leader Victor Reuther, organizer during Flint GM plant sit-down strikes, shot and wounded at his home in Detroit.
  • 1961: Freedom Riders arrested right after arriving in Jackson, Mississippi, as they entered whites-only bus station waiting room.
  • 1968: At Stockholm University, students occupied their Student Union Building at Holländargatan until the 27th to send a political message to the government.
  • 1968: Louisville Riots: After a claim of police brutality, police and thousands of National Guard confront rioting protesters and looters. Two black teens die before order is restored.
  • 1968: Four protesters sentenced in Baltimore to 6 years in prison for pouring blood over draft records during Vietnam War.
  • 1968: In midst of national strikes and protests, French President de Gaulle asks nation to “back me or sack me”
  • 1971: Twenty-nine US soldiers sign anti-war newspaper advert in North Carolina.
  • 1980: Over a thousands are arrested during an occupation of nuclear power plant construction site in Seabrook, New Hampshire.
  • 1981: International Women’s Day for Disarmament declared. Calls for end to horror and devastation of armed conflict.
  • 1987: Romanian anarchist Eugen Relgis dies in Montevideo, Uruguay.
  • 1990: Judi Bari and Darryl Cherney of Earth First! car bombed in Oakland, CA. Police sabotage case and witch hunt local activist groups.
  • 1992: Thai dictator General Suchinda Kraprayoon, resigns following pro-democracy protests.
  • 2000: Israeli troops finish withdrawal from southern Lebabnon, ending 18 years of occupation.
  • 2012: Quebec Student Strike: The “Casseroles” series of nightly protests had rapidly expanded to most Montreal residential neighbourhoods outside of the usual protest routes.
  • 2015: Death of Morris Beckman, one of the 43 group against Moseley’s fascists during the 1940s.
On This Day: May 20

Endangered Species Day

  • 1743: Birth of Haitian revolutionary Toussaint L'Ouverture in Cap-Haïtien.
  • 1795: Insurrection of the Sans-culottes (insurrection of 1 Prairial Year III) against Thermidorian Convention.
  • 1802: Napoleon Bonaparte reinstates slavery in the French colonies, revoking its abolition in the French Revolution.
  • 1887: Lenin’s older brother Aleksandr Ulyanov executed for conspiring to kill the Tsar.
  • 1897: Diego Abad de Santillán was born in Reyero, Spain. He was an author, economist and leading figure in the Spanish and Argentine anarchist movements.
  • 1910: Miyashita Takichi is the first anarchist arrested in what would become the High Treason Incident.
  • 1913: Emma Goldman and Ben Reitman were arrested in San Diego, California, and put on a train out of town after vigilantes surrounded the police station.
  • 1916: Emma Goldman speaks to garment workers in New York City’s Union Square about the benefits of birth control.
  • 1917: Birth of Tony Cliff in Jerusalem. He was a Trotskyist and a founding member of the Socialist Review Group, which eventually became the Socialist Workers Party, in 1977 Cliff became effectively the leader.
  • 1926: US Railway Labor Act enacted after strikes - guarantees collective bargaining rights to railroad workers.
  • 1938: 500 unemployed in Relief Project Workers’ Union start sit-down strike at Vancouver’s Hotel Georgia.
  • 1945: Death of German anarcho-syndicalist Fritz Kater.
  • 1951: Australian Christian anarchist Dave Andrews was born.
  • 1961: Freedom Riders are assaulted in Montgomery, Alabama, at the Greyhound Bus Station.
  • 1963: White mobs attack the Freedom Riders’ bus in Montgomery, Alabama.
  • 1965: The Vietnam Day Committee organizes the largest Vietnam teach-in to date. 30,000 attend the 36-hour event at Berkeley, including Benjamin Spock, Norman Thomas, Norman Mailer, Mario Savio, Paul Krassner, Dick Gregory and Phil Ochs. Hundreds march to the draft board, where Lyndon Johnson is hanged in effigy, and many burn draft cards.
  • 1967: The Spring Mobilization Conference is held in Washington, D.C. 700 anti-war activists gather to discuss the April 15 protests, and to plan future demonstrations.
  • 1968: Sanctuary given during Vietnam War by Boston’s Arlington Street Church to Talmanson and Chase.
  • 1980: Koreans rise up in Kwangju against the repressive US-supported government under dictator General Chun Doo-Hwan.
  • 1989: The Chinese authorities declare martial law due to pro-democracy protests.
  • 2002: Death of Stephen Jay Gould, left-wing US paleontologist, evolutionist and writer.
  • 2006: A series of massive textile strikes involving 1.8 million workers started in Dhaka, Bangladesh.
  • 2012: Quebec Student Strike: In Montreal, during an evening protest that turned violent, a protester was seriously injured by police officers in riot gear.
On This Day: May 19
  • 1850: 4,000 Mexican workers gather in Sonora, CA, protesting the “Foreign Miners’ Tax” brought in to drive them from gold fields.
  • 1895: Death of Jose Marti, Cuban revolutionary.
  • 1897: After two years, Oscar Wilde was released from Reading Prison after serving 2 years for homosexuality.
  • 1904: Anarcho-communist Daniel Guérin was born in Paris. Best known for his work Anarchism: From Theory to Practice, as well as his collection No Gods No Masters: An Anthology of Anarchism.
  • 1921: West Virginian Governor proclaims martial law during miners’ strike for union recognition on 1st anniversary of Matewan Massacre.
  • 1925: Malcome X born in Omaha, Nebraska.
  • 1941: Lola Ridge dies in Brooklyn. She was an Irish-American anarchist poet and an influential editor of avant-garde, feminist, and Marxist publications.
  • 1952: Lillian Hellman, playwright refuses to testify against friends and associates to the House Committee on Un-American Activities.
  • 1960: SANE holds an anti-arms race rally at Madison Square Garden in New York, NY. 20,000 attend.
  • 1970: Student riot at Fresno State University.
  • 1989: Death of Trinidadian Marxist philosopher CLR James in London. He was author of “The Black Jacobins” and other writings on class, race and cricket.
  • 2010: Thailand’s army forces surrender of United Front for Democracy Against Dictatorship leaders and ends pro-democracy protests.
  • 2012: Quebec Student Strike: In Montreal, bonfires and barricades in the street. Police accused of using excessive force on peaceful members of the crowd, such as pepper-spraying a patio full of bar patrons.
  • 2012: Quebec Student Strike: Montreal-based band Arcade Fire wore the “red square” solidarity symbol during a performance with Mick Jagger on the season finale of Saturday Night Live.
On This Day: May 18
  • 1781: Tupac Amaru II and Peruvian indigenous leaders who rebelled against Spanish rule are drawn and quartered in Plaza Mayor del Cuzco.
  • 1827: Josiah Warren opened his first Time Store in Cincinnati, Ohio.
  • 1872: Bertrand Russell was born in Trellech, UK. He was a Nobel prize for literature, and was imprisoned during WWI and 1961 for pacifism and protesting in Whitehall.
  • 1895: Augusto Sandino born in Niquinohomo, Nicaragua. He was leader of original Sandinista movement for Nicaraguan independence.
  • 1912: Walter Sisulu born in Ngcobo, South Africa. An anti-apartheid activist and member of the ANC who was jailed at Robben Island, for 25 years.
  • 1917: In the US, the draft was reinstated, both Emma Goldman and Alexander Berkman spoke at a rally opposing the draft.
  • 1917: Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen start organizing in packinghouses across US.
  • 1920: Ten die when coal company officials in Matewan, West Virginia, try evicting striking union workers from the company’s housing.
  • 1922: In India, Mohandas Gandhi is sentenced to six years in prison for civil disobedience. He would serve only 2 years.
  • 1928: Big Bill Haywood dies in Moscow. He was a founding member and leader of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW).
  • 1950: Start of 6-month Atlanta transit strike over permit fee and fingerprinting for cab and trolley drivers.
  • 1959: The National Liberation Committee of Côte d'Ivoire is founded.
  • 1966: 10,000 anti-war protesters picket the White House.
  • 1966: 10,000 students rally against the draft at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.
  • 1968: 10,000 march in Madrid in solidarity with the revolt in France. Barricades erected and clashes with police occurred.
  • 1972: Philip Berrigan went to jail for burning draft files.
  • 1972: Margaret (Maggie) Kuhn founds Gray Panthers to advocate for seniors’ rights.
  • 1979: Silkwood vs Kerr-McGee case settled: companies are responsible for damage to health of workers in the nuclear industry.
  • 1980: The Gwangju uprising in Kwangju, South Korea against the regime of the West-backed dictator General Chun Doo-Hwan.
  • 1991: 200,000 involved in violent anti-government protests in South Korea after the fatal beating of a student protester by police.
  • 1993: Copenhagen riots because of Danish exceptions in the Maastricht Treaty referendum. Police open fire and injure eleven demonstrators.
  • 2012: Quebec Student Strike: Bill 78 passed in the National Assembly of Quebec during the early hours of the morning and the municipality of Montreal passed a law prohibiting mask-wearing during any organization or demonstration.