strychnin

Globally, dogs have caused about 10 extinctions and continue to threaten another 150 species. In the United States alone, some 78,000 dogs roam habitats close to urban and suburban development. From marine shores and grasslands to woodlands and coniferous forests, dogs chase and attack wild birds and deer and terrorize native predators such as gray foxes and even pumas.

Even the scent of a dog is enough to compel wildlife to flee and hide. The presence of dogs accelerates heartbeats in bighorn sheep and causes marmots to be more hesitant to reemerge from their burrows. Some animals will abandon living in an area altogether if dogs visit frequently, forcing them to give up precious opportunities to feed and travel.

Elsewhere, dogs serve as reservoirs for a host of diseases — such as rabies, canine parvovirus and leishmaniasis (also known as black or dumdum fever). Studies from Brazil reveal that wildlife and livestock in proximity to dogs are particularly at risk of leishmaniasis, which infects roughly 1.6 million people a year. In China’s Wolong Reserve, free-roaming dogs share at least four microparasites with the reserve’s giant pandas, threatening Wolong’s precious pandas with several pathogens.

In poor countries such as Nepal, dog populations — originally used to ward off snow leopards — have exploded. Unwanted dogs are left roaming villages, living on food scraps or hunting wildlife in forest habitats. Inevitably, conflicts mount. In the Annapurna Conservation Area, villagers routinely poison dogs with strychnine, a readily available poison that induces a long, painful death. It’s not uncommon to find dog carcasses in rivers and landfills. Sadly, when vultures and other scavengers eat the carrion, they are poisoned, too.

—  Dogs are man’s best friend — but one of wildlife’s worst foes, Debby Ng and Joel Berger, The Washington Post. 24 March 2017.

2

Locusta the Poisoner—Ancient Rome’s Deadliest Assassin,

Perhaps the most feared woman in the ancient world, Locusta was a first century AD assassin who offered her services to wealthy and powerful Roman patricians, politicians, and military leaders.  So infamous were her deeds that her career was detailed by Juvenal, Seutonius, Cassius Dio, and Tacitus.  Born in Gaul (modern day France) Locusta was raised by her mother to be an herbalist, a healer who specialized in using medicinal plants and herbs. However, her career abruptly changed when she moved to Rome in search for greater opportunities, she found that her skills could put to much more lucrative uses killing people rather than healing.  Rome was rife with political intrigue, and skilled assassins were in high demand.

Locusta intensely studied poisonous plants, becoming a “master poisoner” in short time.  She knew of scores of different poisons; poisons that could bring about a heart attack, poisons that could cause a stroke, poisons that affected the nervous system, even poisons that would make it seem like the victim had died of something completely natural, such as the flu or plague.  For several years, Locusta hired out her services to wealthy patrician families and powerful politicians, or whoever was the highest bidder. In 54 AD Locusta was approached by Agrippina, wife of Emperor Claudius, with perhaps the biggest and most important job of her career; to assassinate the Emperor himself.  Agrippina wanted her son from another marriage to be Emperor, and thus Claudius had to go.  On October 13th, Locusta infiltrated Claudius’ palace, distracting a guard by placing a laxative in his drink.  She then tainted a dish of mushrooms, Claudius’ favorite dish, with strychnine.  Claudius consumed the poisoned mushrooms.  A few hours later, he began suffering strong stomach cramps, then he began foaming at the mouth and convulsing. Agrippina appeared to attempt to force Claudius to vomit the poison by sticking a feather down his throat.  Of course, the feather was also poisoned by Locusta with a potent toxin.  Emperor Claudius died a short time later.

When Nero came to throne, he made Locusta his personal assassin.  Among another of her famous hits was the poisoning of his brother, Britannicus, whom he felt threatened his rule.  Between 55 and 68 AD, Locusta was responsible for removing a number of Nero’s rivals and enemies.  Of course, Nero was not a popular Emperor, and after the burning of Rome he was stripped of his titles and declared an enemy of the state by the senate.  After Nero’s suicide Rome fell into a chaotic civil war as Roman generals and warlords fought for control over the empire.  One of these generals, a short reigning Emperor named Galba, despised Locusta because of her former status as Nero’s chief assassin.  On January 15th, 69 AD, Locusta was dragged from her home into the streets of Rome, and was publicly executed.

2

Who is Neil Dovestone?

On a bleak wintry day, a cyclist journeying through Saddleworth Moor made an unusual discovery. Down the embankment lay the corpse of a man who looked like he could be asleep. “At first, I thought he might have been lying down enjoying the view.” His eyes were open and his arms were lying across his chest in a relaxed manner. However, it was the cold weather and torrential rain that struck Stuart Crowther as unusual. It wasn’t until he got closer, that he realised that the man was dead.

Pathologists who worked on the case have taken to calling him “Neil Dovestone” after the name of the reservoir on Saddleworth Moor near to where he was found. He had no personal possessions on his body when he was found, apart from £130 in his pocket. This suggests that, if he committed suicide, he didn't want anybody knowing his identity. He has certainly succeeded in that, as nobody can work out where he came from, or who he is. It has been determined that Neil caught a train from London to Manchester and then travelled to the Moors from there. The last person who spoke to him was the landlord of a local pub. Neil had asked him for directions to the top of the mountain: “I told him there’s not enough daylight for him to get there and back today. He just thanked me and asked me again for the directions, which I repeated to him. And he just set off.” 21 hours later, his body was found. But why did he travel 200 miles to die in this particular spot?

Recently, high traces of Strychnine (A pretty rare poison) have been found in his body following a third autopsy. Police had previously found a bottle of this substance by his body, so they traced the batch. It was made in Pakistan, as it’s no longer legal in the UK. Now this is where it gets interesting: Neil also had a plate fitted in his leg, probably following an injury. The plate was manufactured and fitted in Pakistan. It seemed unusual that he would have connections to the country, but he had evidently travelled there to have the operation. Someone suggested that he had lived there and had travelled over to the UK, but demographically, this is highly unlikely as Neil was a Caucasian man in his mid-sixties to early seventies:

Police have been appealing for information since December, but have no strong leads. Those desperate to solve the case live in hope that even people who wish never to be found will always leave clues behind. But for now, all the answers stay hidden with the body called Neil Dovestone, still lying in the Oldham hospital morgue.

3

The Alnwick Poison Garden is a gated garden located inside The Alnwick Garden adjacent to Alnwick Castle in Northumberland, England. This gated garden features a number of intoxicating and poisonous plants, such as nux vomica, the source of strychnine. This poison is often used to kill small mammals but has also been used by a number of murderers. The garden consists of approximately 100 deadly plants and has a number of warning signs to not touch or even small the plants, with the majority being caged.

fight-me-boi  asked:

Poisonous plants with pretty flowers? For my story I'm having a nerdish inventor type character flirting with an heir to a crime empire the inventor is kinda saying you're beautiful but deadly

Hi, Fight-me-boi. What is probably the most poisonous tree in the world is the manchineel tree. But I’m not going to recommend your character use it. For a few reasons a)I can’t find pictures of it’s flowers to be able to say it’s beautiful and b) it’s so dangerous that standing under one in the rain can give you blisters and inhaling the smoke of one burning can make you go blind. If you search for images of them, there are signs posted on them to warn people to stay away because of how dangerous.

I started with that because you weren’t completely clear on how poisonous you wanted the plant to be. Going off of the “beautiful but deadly” I’m going to try to stick with plants that can kill humans. 

My favorite flower is Lily-of-the-Valley. But even though it looks so dainty, the plant contains 38 different cardiac glycosides. All parts of the plant are toxic.

Hemlock is a classic poison, but there are actually two famously poisonous hemlock plants. Poison hemlock is poisonous if eaten and will numb the extremities with the numbness creeping in until the lungs are paralyzed. Water hemlock, which is considered the most poisonous plant in North America, causes violent, painful convulsions and cramps.

Arconite, aka wolfsbane, aka monkshood, aka devil’s helmet, is another traditional poison. It was used by shepherds to poison arrows shot at wolves that would prey on the flocks and the poison ultimately works by respiratory failure.

Larkspur is related to Arconite and is similarly dangerous. Brief contacts with stems and leaves can irritate the skin and ingestion will lead to respiratory paralysis, and thus death.

Oleander is quite pretty and very toxic. The entire plant, including nectar, is poisonous. It’s said that as little as 100g  is enough to kill a full-grown horse.

Yellow Jessamine has similar alkaloids to strychnine which makes it quite poisonous, even to honeybees gathering its nectar.

There are many many more poisonous plants that fit these criteria. Too many to show in one post.  Some of them are:

Foxglove
Golden Chain
Mother of Millions
Windflower
English Broom
White Snakeroot
Angel’s Trumpet
Autumn Crocus
Suicide Tree
Deadly Nightshade
Mountain Laurel
Calla Lily
Laburnum
Bloodroot
Adenium obesum

I hope this helps.

~*Mod Den*~

Disclaimer


http://webecoist.momtastic.com/2009/10/26/gorgeous-but-deadly-13-unassuming-poisonous-plants/

https://health-conditions.knoji.com/top-23-world-deadliest-and-poisonous-flowers/

https://home.bt.com/lifestyle/house-home/gardening/poisonous-plants-7-of-the-worlds-most-deadly-flowers-11363929380548

http://listverse.com/2014/05/22/10-beautiful-flowers-that-kill-in-horrifying-ways/

http://www.therichest.com/rich-list/beautiful-but-deadly-10-flowers-that-can-actually-kill-you/

https://www.planetdeadly.com/nature/most-poisonous-plants

A handy list of poisons for writing reference, provided to you by me, Bella

Poisoning is one of the oldest murder tactics in the books. It was the old equalizer, and while it’s often associated with women, historically men are no less likely to poison you. This is not a guide on how to poison people, you banana bunches, it’s a guide on writing about poisons in fiction so you don’t end up on a watch list while researching them. I’ve taken that hit for you. You’re welcome. These are just a few of the more classic ones.

  • Hemlock: Hemlock (conium maculatum) is one of the more famous ones, used in ancient times most notably in Socrates’ forced suicide execution. So it goes. The plant has bunches of small, white flowers, and can grow up to ten feet tall. It’s a rather panicky way to die, although it wouldn’t show: hemlock is a paralytic, so the cause of death is most often asphyxiation due to respiratory paralysis, although the mind remains unaffected and aware.
  • Belladonna: Atropa belladonna is also called deadly nightshade. It has pretty, trumpet-shaped purple flowers and dark, shiny berries that actually look really delicious which is ironic since it’s the most toxic part of the plant. The entire plant is poisonous, mind you, but the berries are the most. One of the most potent poisons in its hemisphere, it was used as a beauty treatment, so the story says, and rubbed into the eyes to make the eyes dilate and the cheeks flush. Hench the name beautiful lady. The death is more lethargic than hemlock, although its symptoms are worse: dilated pupils, sensitivity to light, blurred vision, tachycardia, loss of balance, staggering, headache, rash, flushing, severely dry mouth and throat, slurred speech, urinary retention, constipation, confusion, hallucinations, delirium, and convulsions. It’s toxic to animals, but cattle and rabbits can eat it just fine, for some reason. 
  • Arsenic: Arsenic comes from a metalloid and not a plant, unlike the others here, but it’s easily the most famous and is still used today. Instead of being distilled from a plant, chunks of arsenic are dug up or mined. It was once used as a treatment for STDs, and also for pest control and blacksmithing, which was how many poisoners got access to it. It was popular in the middle ages because it looked like a cholera death, due to acute symptoms including stomach cramps, diarrhea, confusion, convulsions, vomiting, and death. Slow poisoning looked more like a heart attack. The Italians famously claimed that a little arsenic improved the taste of wine.
  • Strychnine: Strychnine (strick-nine) is made from the seed of strychnos nux vomica and causes poisoning which results in muscular convulsions and eventually death through asphyxia. Convulsions appear after inhalation or injection—very quickly, within minutes—and take somewhat longer to manifest after ingestion, around approximately 15 minutes. With a very high dose, brain death can occur in 15 to 30 minutes. If a lower dose is ingested, other symptoms begin to develop, including seizures, cramping, stiffness, hypervigilance, and agitation. Seizures caused by strychnine poisoning can start as early as 15 minutes after exposure and last 12 – 24 hours. They are often triggered by sights, sounds, or touch and can cause other adverse symptoms, including overheating, kidney failure, metabolic and respiratory acidosis. During seizures, abnormal dilation, protrusion of the eyes, and involuntary eye movements may occur. It is also slightly hallucinogenic and is sometimes used to cut narcotics. It also notably has no antidote. In low doses, some use it as a performance enhancer.
  • Curare: Chondrodendron tomentosum is lesser known than its famous cousins, but kills in a very similar way to hemlock. It is slow and terrible, as the victim is aware and the heart may beat for many minutes after the rest of the body is paralyzed. If artificial respiration is given until the poison subsides, the victim will survive.
  • WolfsbaneAconitum has several names; Monkshood, aconite, Queen of Poisons, women’s bane, devil’s helmet) and is a pretty, purple plant with gourd-shaped flowers. The root is the most potent for distillation. Marked symptoms may appear almost immediately, usually not later than one hour, and with large doses death is near instantaneous. Death usually occurs within two to six hours in fatal poisoning. The initial signs are gastrointestinal including nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. This is followed by a sensation of burning, tingling, and numbness in the mouth and face, and of burning in the abdomen. In severe poisonings pronounced motor weakness occurs and sensations of tingling and numbness spread to the limbs. The plant should be handled with gloves, as the poison can seep into the skin.
  • FoxgloveDigitalis is large with trumpet-shaped flowers that can be many colors, but usually a pinkish shade. It may have from the term foxes-glew, which translated to fairy music. Intoxication causes nausea, vomiting and diarrhea, as well as sometimes resulting in xanthopsia (jaundiced or yellow vision) and the appearance of blurred outlines (halos), drooling, abnormal heart rate, cardiac arrhythmias, weakness, collapse, dilated pupils, tremors, seizures, and even death. Slowed heartbeat also occurs. Because a frequent side effect of digitalis is reduction of appetite and the mortality rate is low, some individuals have used the drug as a weight-loss aid. It looks a bit like comfrey, which is an aid for inflammation. Make sure not to confuse the two.
D&D Homebrew Poisons

So, im working on a mini series for badassdanddpics and was wondering if you guys had any ideas. im calling the mini series “Bewildering Botany and Perilous Poisons” that will basically showcase magical plant homebrew that will aid adventures and villains alike. for the poison section of it, i put together some basic information from D&D about the rules as well as how they are applied and used against others as well as common symptoms from plants in the real world.

different poisons are applied to victims by

  • contact
  • ingested
  • inhaled
  • injury
  • smoke from being burned

common rules (for 5th edition D&D regarding poison)

  • A weapon coated with poison will dry out in one minute.
  • When you are poisoned, you will usually suffer from the poisoned condition.
  • Poison can be bought or crafted using the downtime rules and a poisoner’s kit.
  • Cures for poison include low level spells or anti-toxin.
  • Truth Serum is listed under poisons, and is something I think could be useful in your campaign in many different ways.
  • Poisoned: A poisoned creature has disadvantage on attack rolls and ability checks.
  • each round until you make a saving throw.

Common symptoms of poisoning include nausea, vomiting, convulsions, liver failure, disables nerves, lowers blood pressure, and can stop the heart, muscle twitches, and sometimes paralysis, irritation of skin throat and mouth, swelling, burning pain, breathing difficulties and stomach upset. dilated pupils, sensitivity to light, blurred vision, tachycardia, loss of balance, staggering, headache, rash, flushing, dry mouth and throat, slurred speech, urinary retention, constipation, confusion, hallucinations, delirium, convulsions and photo-toxicity

underneath the “keep reading” i have included some actual plants that could help with creating realistic homebrew.

Keep reading

The signs as poisons or toxins

Aries: VX, a nerve agent developed for no reason other than to be a bio-weapon. It causes violent muscle contractions followed by paralysis, asphyxiation, and death. 

Taurus: Deadly nightshade, a plant that can be used as a hallucinogen at low doses. An overdose causes abnormally fast heart rate, loss of balance, and convulsions. A lethal overdose involves a lack of control over heart rate, breathing, and sweating followed by death. 

Gemini: Sarin, a highly volatile nerve agent that’s been used in several terrorist attacks. It can cause effects as a liquid or a gas and leads to tightness in the chest followed by nausea, muscle convulsions, suffocation, and death. 

Cancer: Amatoxin, a toxin produced by several species of poisonous mushrooms. It causes burns where it comes into contact with the body and leads to liver damage and eventual liver and/or kidney failure. 

Leo: Ricin, a protein derived from castor seeds. It leads to swelling and bleeding in the digestive tract, followed shortly by low blood pressure, shock, organ failure, and death. It has also been used in terrorist attacks.

Virgo: Mercury, element 80 on periodic table. Exposure causes burning and itching along with the sensation of insects crawling on one’s skin or skin peeling from the body. Long-term exposure leads to severe brain damage and death. 

Libra: Tetrodotoxin, a neurotoxin found in pufferfish and some other species of the same order. The toxin causes a lack of function in voluntary muscles, including the diaphragm, which leads to paralysis, asphyxiation, and death. 

Scorpio: Cyanide, the chemical compound KCN. Results depend on exposure; low long-term exposure can cause eventual paralysis and increased chance of miscarriages, while high doses result in seizures, cardiac arrest, and death. 

Sagittarius: Strychnine, an alkaloid derived from the Strychnos nux-vomica tree and used as a pesticide. In humans it causes dramatic and painful convulsions that can lead to muscles locking up and organs failing. Those exposed die of either asphyxiation or exhaustion from the convulsions.

Capricorn: Polonium, a radioactive metal and number 84 on the periodic table. It can cause death in extremely small doses, and long-term exposure leads to radiation poisoning, which can cause kidney or liver failure, cancer, and eventual death. 

Aquarius: Arsenic, a toxic metal that is number 33 on the periodic table. Acute poisoning can lead to hair loss, muscle cramping, convulsions, and death. Long-term exposure, such as through groundwater, may lead to nightblindness, organ failure, cancer, and eventual death. 

Pisces: Mustard gas, a chemical weapon used largely in World War I. It causes causes large chemical burns and blisters, including potential internal burns in the lungs. Even when these symptoms aren’t lethal, exposure may lead to severe health problems years later. 

10

Arsenic and Old Lace (1944)

“For a gallon of elderberry wine, I take one teaspoon full of arsenic, then add half a teaspoon full of strychnine, and then just a pinch of cyanide!”

There was a king.

Reigned in the east. There where kings will sit to feast they get their fill before they think of poisoned meat and poisoned drink. He gathered all that springs to birth from the many venomed earth; First a little, thence to more, he sampled all her killing store; And easy, smiling, seasoned sound, sate the king as healths went ‘round. They put arsenic in his meat, and stared aghast to watch him eat. They poured strychnine in his cup, and shook to see him drink it up. They shook, they stared as white their shirts: them it was their poison hurt. I tell the tale that I heard told - Mithridates, he died old. 

Isn’t that a fun little story? 

No, Mcpezberrylynnfabsonandercraw Von Sebroseportermanhudkelliot Chang, your eyes do not deceive you. I have returned. I jump higher, run faster, and I now hold the world record for the longest distance pulled by a horse while on fire, as witnessed by several bored Russian prostitutes. It has been a long three weeks, hasn’t it? 

Anecdotes aside, my father has reason to anticipate his campaign’s victory this coming Tuesday, and I encourage you to rejoice amongst yourselves. He ran a purely inspirational campaign, the likes of which I have been fortunate enough to experience first-hand this month, and extends his gratitude to those of you who may have needlessly pledged your time or money. 

Additionally, if you have not yet noticed, my blog has been updated. While the mechanics are essentially the same, there is a new feature which I expect will draw some attention. Under the main navigation, you can find a monthly excerpt from my bestselling autobiography, “Hunter Clarington: The Bloodline’s Burden.” This month’s excerpt has been taken from the ninth chapter of my life, and reads: 

“At the tender age of nine I embarked on my first tour of the New York Academy of Divine Arcanum. It was a sensually overwhelming experience: first, there were the alluring aromas flooding out from underneath the doors of Madame Jason’s. As a young Cardine-in-training, I had not yet been exposed to dessert (I celebrated birthdays with protein shakes and the occasional cheese platter). Upon noting my weakness in the face of those aromatic forbidden treasures, my father clasped my hand at once and pulled me along, enticing that he had something even better to show me. We stood out, then, on the roof of the observatory, and watched over the vast expanse of campus, equal in stature. My father put a hand on my shoulder, and with the other, unoccupied one, made a vast sweeping motion outward, “Everything the light touches,” He said, and smiled, “Is your kingdom.”. I remember quite liking the sound of that, but I had some hesitations. I pointed to a ghastly building off in the distance, cast in shadow, “Even that?” I asked. He shook his head, “No,” He said, “That’s Sciron Square. You must never go there.””

Cheers.

Signed, 
         - H.C. 

5

Christina Edmunds was born in 1828 to a respectable family. Growing up not much happened to Christina until she met Dr. Charles beard. Although he claimed they never had a sexual affair it is believed that they did indeed get together, even though he was all ready married. When he decided to break it off, Christina responded in kind by sending doctor Beard’s wife a gift of poisoned chocolates. In 1870 Mrs. Beard became seriously ill but recovered. Beard suspected Edmunds of poisoning his wife, however for fear of the affair coming to light he kept his mouth shut. If he had only gone to the police with his suspicions he may have stopped Christina Edmund’s poisoning spree. She would buy chocolates from the local stores and lace them with strychnine, then return the chocolates to the stores so the tainted candy would be resold to an unsuspecting public. She got the strychnine from a dentist friend, claiming it was to kill stray cats. She began to draw attention to herself for buying so much chocolate, so she started to pay kids to buy the chocolates for her. Several people in Brighton had become ill from eating the chocolates but nobody connected the illness with the chocolates. In June 1871, Sidney Albert, a 4 year old on vacation with his family, died as a result of eating the tainted chocolates. This however did not deter Edmonds from increasing her poisoning rampage. She started sending parcels of chocolates to prominent people, including Mrs beard again. She even sent chocolates to herself to deflect suspicion. But once Dr. Beard informed the police of his suspicions, he brought to light the psychopath that was Christina Edmunds. She was arrested and charged with the attempted murder of Mrs. Beard and the murder of Sidney Albert. Her trial began at the Old Bailey in January of 1872 where her mother testified that both sides of their family had a history of mental illness. She was found guilty and sentenced to death, however it was reprieved due to the mental state of Edmunds and instead she received life in prison. She spent the rest of her life in Broadmoor Criminal Lunatic Asylum, dying there in 1907. She became known as the Chocolate Cream Poisoner. Pictured above are Christina Edmunds, her weapons of choice, some newspaper clippings from the time and Broadmoor Asylum. Source Wikipedia

8

“Sometimes I feel sure he is as mad as a hatter and then, just as he is at his maddest, I find there is a method in his madness.”

anonymous asked:

Everyone always asks you if you like certain bands,, and you say no alot. Why don't you give us a playlist of songs you like? Top 15-20 or somthing?

these aren’t all of my favorite songs, this was mostly me trying to name songs that i love that you guys might also enjoy so yaknow i hope some of you like these

- dressed in decay by cky
- girl anachronism by the dresden dolls
- superbad (11:34) by travie mccoy
- infinity guitars by sleigh bells
- ultimate by gogol bordello
- kill the music by every time i die
- help i’m alive by metric
- monster by the automatic
- sideways by citizen cope
- mighty little man by steve burns
- bird flu by m.i.a.
- strychnine by the sonics
- you by tv on the radio
- get well soon by reggie & the full effect
- how many moons by professor green
- carrion by parkway drive
- deceptacon by le tigre
- wild for the night (ft. skrillex) by a$ap rocky
- cirice by ghost
- who was in my room last night? by butthole surfers