structural work

top 5 most iconic things that whites with anxiety do

5. make it about their individual mental illness when people of colour mention white anxiety surrounding issues of race as a fundamental aspect of white psychology, as if we’re talking about individual pathologies (which they assume to be innate) rather than how the structures of whiteness work as a whole

4. “yes this makes me so anxious bc I worry that I do this” handwringing whenever people of colour try to express how racist behaviour harms them, again making it about themselves and acting like mental illness has anything to do with it

3. assume that all people of colour (especially those who are talking about racism at the moment) are neurotypical, ignoring the potential of people of colour to be complex human beings as well as the adverse effects of white supremacy on our mental health

2. “i dinfd’t mean to be racisits and nwo eveyrons’s mad at me adn i’m so anxoisu [insert threat of self-harm]”

1. “I have anxiety so I have the right to be afraid of brown and Black people and if you tell me otherwise then you’re ableist”

lifeandthoughtsandtravel  asked:

I know that you are a reptile tumblr but I was wondering if you knew if it were healthy for dogs to be vegans? I'm just curious because of some vegans that have animals and they make them vegans... is it harmful towards the animal or is it completely safe? thank you :)

It’s an absolutely horrible idea. Dogs cannot be vegans and thrive. They’re not vegetarians and they’re not even really omnivores in the same way we are- while dogs will eat everything we do (and more), feeding them a vegan diet is terrible for their health. A lot of vegans who make this decision will blather on about supplements in the vegan food or about how you can make artificial amino acids or how dogs can survive on it so therefore it’s safe, but dogs can also survive eating Ol’ Roy, the worst dog food in the world. Surviving isn’t the same thing as thriving! A dog’s biological structure means that eating plants and only plants isn’t going to work well in the long run- so let’s look at some of the reasons why dogs need to be fed a diet based in animal protein. 

1. The canine digestive tract is not good at digesting plant matter.

Plant matter is really tough to break down! Meat, on the other hand, digests quickly. Carnivores and herbivores have differently structured digestive tracts that work with their diets. Let’s look at a rabbit’s digestive tract and a dog’s.

See how a rabbit has a functional cecum, while the dog’s is just a little snub of a thing? The cecum is an organ that plays a really important role in non-ruminant herbivore digestion. It’s a large pouch where cellulose and tough fibers in plant-based food get broken down. Dogs, like humans, don’t have one that’s functional for digestion. 

In addition, herbivores like rabbits have very long, complicated digestive tracts. Their food sits in there and breaks down over a long period of time. An average adult rabbit (with a body of about 40 centimeters long, we’re not talking the giant breeds or the dwarf breeds here) has about three meters of small intestine. In American units, that’s a 15 inch animal with almost 10 feet of intestines. A dog, on the other hand, has a small intestine that’s about two and a half times the length of its body- so for instance, a dog that’s two feet long would have about five feet of small intestine. There’s neither enough time nor space in the canine alimentary canal for dogs to fully extract the nutrients they need to survive. 

2. Dog drool doesn’t have amylase.

Amylase an enzyme that converts plant starch and glycogen into simple sugars. Herbivores and omnivores typically have amylase in the saliva, which starts to break down those starches immediately. This means by the time the starches hit the intestine, they’ve already started to convert into something that’s actually useful. Dogs, however, only produce it in the pancreas. There’s no salivary amylase in dogs or any other carnivore. This means that digesting plants and converting their energy into something that’s actually useful is really inefficient for dogs; they can only get something like half of the energy and nutrients they’d get from a comparable amount of meat. It also means that to digest plant material, dogs’ pancreases have to go into overtime to make enough amylase, which can lead to severe pancreatic strain.

3. Dogs can’t digest cellulose.

While the dog pancreas makes amylase, something it doesn’t make is cellulase. Granted, herbivores don’t make it either- in fact, very few animals do. Termites are one of the only animals that make their own cellulase. Herbivore digestive tracts have a reservoir of symbiotic bacteria that produce plenty of cellulase. We’ve actually talked about it- it’s what goes on in the cecum! The bacteria in carnivore ceca, however, is linked to the lymphatic system, not the digestive system. 

There’s also the issue of their teeth not being adapted for a plant-based diet or even the way they eat being good at taking in plants- but the same is true for anything that’s not animal carcasses, including kibble and wet dog food. That’s just evidence that defines them as opportunistic carnivores; what makes a vegan diet so bad for dogs is their digestive biology.

There is one exception to this rule, and that is when a vet prescribes a vegan diet for an animal with significant food allergies or other dietary issues. This is not something vets do unless it’s the best course of treatment for the animal. 

Veganism isn’t the same thing as being an herbivore. Herbivores don’t have a choice; their bodies aren’t built for eating meat. While they might take in animal protein on occasion (deer, for instance, will eat birds sometimes), their teeth, their digestive systems, and their metabolisms all work together to make eating plants the best way for them to survive. A rabbit’s not a vegan- it’s an herbivore. Only humans can be vegans. To be a vegan is to make a choice; it’s to evaluate your place in the world around you and to renegotiate your relationship with all sorts of things- your own body, the food industry, the people around you, and of course the animals you don’t eat. Responsible vegans understand that humans can thrive on an all-vegetable diet; they know that we evolved to be really, really flexible when it comes to the source of our nutrition. While humans are biologically omnivores, we can make that choice.

A dog can’t, and it’s not humanity’s place to force that on them. There are some pets that thrive on an all-vegetable diet. Rabbits, tortoises, finches, hamsters, snails- but not dogs. 

If you’d like more information, this is a fantastic write-up, complete with sources! This is a good, short article written by a vet. This is a blog post that talks about some of the other nutritional deficiencies, particularly involving D3. This is another great writeup with diagrams!

anonymous asked:

Hello!! This may be a weird question but I too am heavily interested in birds but unlike you, I cannot draw them as well. :,^( If it's not too much work (if it is just ignore this, i don't mind), do you know of any good references or sources to learn more about birds from facts to anatomy? I know this is a pretty wide range so again, I totally understand if you can't! I just thought it was worth an ask. Thank you so much!!

i don’t really have any specific reference places but here’s some things i do. 

 drawing birds is arguably one of the hardest animals because of their feathers. unlike fat and fur that folds to the body in a way that’s usually readable to whats underneath, feathers sort of create a ‘bubble’ around the body which makes a lot of body parts indistinguishable to where one ends and another begins. so its important to always think in terms of skeletal anatomy:

birds are dinosaurs and therefore reptiles. looking at birds this way, it’s a lot easier to see their evolution.

with that in mind, say we wanna draw this dude. owls are pretty tough because their outward appearances are so deceiving.

we’ve got a neutral pose, feathers are generously surrounding most of the body so its no sweat, we don’t really know whats going on. but we can hide it. but now we want to make him move and look cool. without really knowing whats going on we might get stuck on something like this:

its always kind of stiff and frustratingly unrealistic. mostly this is because we just don’t have enough knowledge of the skeletal structure to work with. eyeballing anatomy on our first drawing might get something like the left, more than anything people aren’t generous enough with leginess of birds:

 owls do indeed have regular proportioned necks with the rest of their bodies. and their skulls are like that of any other stereotypical raptor under their mask of feathers (minus their freaky eye sockets and ears)) they can open their mouths wide just like a hawk or eagle can. it’s important to remember that birds with large wingspans do not magically lose their length when hidden. they are just conveniently folded in against their bodies.

knowing this we can try again. suddenly things seem to click in place more and have a believable-ness to them.

the rule of thumb for most birds is they have less body mass and more leg/neck than one thinks. they are lanky dinosaurs.

when we are looking at this:

we are seeing this:

with that rule, drawing birds becomes a lot less confusing. with practice you might just eyeball their feathered appearances but if not, going back to skeletal/muscle structure gives the base you need to draw convincing birds.

when it comes to specific body parts, the most challenging part for me personally have always been feet. birds with super twiggy feet are easier because one line per toe is easy to get away with. but when you get to birds with meatier feet, especially raptors, it gets difficult. my way of getting around this is to think of the actual ‘feet’ last. drawing each separate toe first gets confusing because you just find yourself trying to get them to each fit evenly together at the base of the foot. one always seems kind of skinnier or fatter than the others in my experiences, and by the time you correct it the gesture gets muddled and lost.

so i just skip that part until later, i draw talon first.

perhaps this is very unorthodox, but just like artists might square in the hands first on a human before working out the arms, i square in the talons to know where i want them before worrying how they go on exactly.

that way we have a clear gesture captured, and in my experience it is much more readable.

thats’ really all i can think of now in terms of my techniques, i hope this helps :V

IDK why it’s not a more popular headcanon that Mccree didn’t just lose his arm in whatever explosion/calamity he went through, but also a significant chunk of his torso

I would imagine that whatever it was would have definitely taken out most of that side of his body, and even if it didn’t they would have had to do some serious work to create a working structure that supported the weight of his arm on his torso

I’ve also considered that those gigantic tubes wired into his stomach are just some fancy cooling system, but I also genuinely think it’s more likely Mccree’s got quite the injury that’s more than just a missing limb. He might even have some artificial/biomechanical organs under all that plating. 

Not to mention his torso kinda sorta resembles Zenyatta’s 

As well as Genji’s

So I do pretty much believe that the setup on Mccree’s torso isn’t just armor plating you can take off, especially since there’s no discernible reason a chest plate should glow like that unless it’s got some mechanisms running under there

How To Blend Cultures (Without Making Impossible Mixes)

This is a guide specifically about fantasy worldbuilding. WWC gets a lot of questions around “I’m mixing two cultures together, how do I do that?” and this is to explain both how to do that and when you very much should not.

For starters, you should avoid blending empires with their surrounding properties, especially if there is recent political strife along those lines. This is why Japan/China/Korea (or even China/Tibet) mixes should not be done. For more information on that, take a look at Research:Large to Small Scale, Avoiding Homogenizing East Asian Cultures, & Paralleling Regions Appropriately.

Next up, mixing Greece/Rome with far-flung cultures gets a little bit eyebrow raising. Unless it was a direct trading partner/conquered property, Greek/Roman cultures do not mix with non-European cultures. The Greek empire only went to the Northern regions of India at its very peak, and that is limited to the ancient world. Rome stopped in the Middle East, so, again, you don’t have the cultural backing for a mixing of anything outside of its borders. 

Depictions of Rome and Greece in ancient literature shows other ancient cultures found them quite backwards, and were adverse to mixing with them. By many standards they were very backwards, and it’s only Europe (and, as an extension, America) that revered them to the extent they do. Asia and Africa had no reason to see them as advanced, because they made many more technological advancements than either. North America and Oceanic cultures hardly interacted with either, and had both their own technological advancements+ cultures closer by to borrow advancements from, instead. 

Outside of that, cultures are born out of the environments that made them. As a result, places with wildly dissimilar climates and resources pools will not be able to blend harmoniously unless you’re taking a modern analogue society where globalism has happened. This is plain old because resources only travel so far, and people are more likely to build culture around resources they have easy access to (even well-established trade links can lead to people re-creating things: Han purple and Egyptian blue point to an ancient trade link, but they were made with local materials processed differently).

Roman architecture exists because the Romans had access to copious amounts of concrete materials/marble and lived in the Mediterranean, which got very hot summers, heavy rains, and not a whole lot of cold. As a result they created structures that worked for this, which included open airways, pillars, easy to clean floors, shade, and ventilation. Places that lack these resources will not be able to replicate Rome.

Their resource pool was very specific to their regions, and there’s a reason Rome had the rule that anybody who did’t live like Romans were slaves: it was really hard to live like a Roman, and they wanted their slave pool as large as possible. 

Different cultures with different resources formed in wildly different ways, and might not even have anything similar to Greece or Rome. Because of this, you need to look really close at why culture developed the way it did. If it’s because they had extremely dissimilar resources pools, it’s wise to not blend the cultures (or at least not think they’ll look anything like their original cultures) 

Which brings me to value systems. Cultures put value on different things. Each culture ends up with a base philosophy for what they esteem and how they use resources, which proceeds to influence how it develops. Architecture has meaning to it. So does what colours you use in different applications. Because these things are sacred and/or practical for certain social orders. “Sacred” in cultures ends up becoming a shorthand for “this ritual helps us survive.”

There is no such thing as “aesthetic” when you get down to the root of each single item, because that aesthetic has a practical purpose. There is also no such thing as a “solely religious reason” under the same logic. Cows have become sacred in most varieties of Hinduism— because cows (and oxen) have been the main farming animal in the Indian subcontinent for millennia. They provide milk for sustenance, power for ploughing fields, and dung, which can be used as a floor polish and, when dried, a source of fuel for fire that gives off a more even heat than wood. As a single provider for crucial elements of agrarian life, their sacredness developed from their practicality. Having cows roam freely meant absolutely everyone could have access to an efficient cooking fuel.

Chinese brush painting has meaning. Jade sculpture has meaning. Pagodas and sloped roofs and gates have meaning. The philosophy, environment, history, and present circumstances of a culture is built into every. single. little. thing. about that culture, meaning you cannot just change it out.

Unless you learn the very root of culture, their values and stigmas and honours and shames, you cannot modify it accurately. Cultures survive because that was the best way to respond to the world at the time. A long-standing culture such as China’s has to be functional and incredibly well suited for the environment, otherwise it would not have survived. There is something about Chinese culture that works extraordinarily well for it to perpetuate itself, and you cannot disrespect that.

Learn the “why” of culture. Learn how it came to manifest and the reasons behind its manifestations. Study the geography and resources available to the people at hand. Know a culture so well you can explain how it works in real life and how your world’s history parallels the circumstances that created a similar culture in fantasy.

Only then will you be able to pull it off with respect.

~ Mod Lesya

anonymous asked:

How many types plot structures are there and how are they used?

Hiya! Thanks for your question! Plot structures are important for creating a good story.

There’s an infinite amount of plot structures depending on the story you’re telling. Some types are better than others within certain genres. Here are the most common plot structures, and how they’re used:

The Four Main Plot Structures:

Freytag’s Pyramid:

Also known as dramatic structure, this is the most simplistic of plot structures, and probably the one you were taught in elementary school. In this type of story structure, the climax falls in the middle, and the latter half of the story consists of falling action and the resolution. This was developed to analyze Greek and Shakespearian plays that use a five-act structure.

Why it’s good: It allows authors to explore the consequences of one’s actions. It’s also good for story analysis.

Why it’s bad: Long resolutions get boring fast. Modern novels don’t use this because no one wants to read a story where the villain is defeated in the middle.

When to use it: Children’s books and short stories

It’s good to use in children’s books because the goal of most children’s books is to teach kids a lesson. Using Freytag’s Pyramid gives writers the chance to teach kids the consequences of doing something wrong (lying, bullying, etc.). It works in short stories because the limited length prevents the denouement from being too long and boring the reader.

Examples: Any of Shakespeare’s plays

The Fichtean Curve:

This is what most modern novels use, no matter the genre. The Fichtean Curve features a varying number of crises (or mini-climaxes) within the rising action to build up to climax about two-thirds of the way through the story. The falling action is short and used to wrap up loose ends or establish a new way of life for the characters.

Why it’s good: Putting crises throughout the story will keep readers hooked until the end. It also helps to keep good pacing. Despite being frequently used, this structure is loose enough that anyone can use it and make it unique for their own story.

Why it’s bad: Too much action can be overwhelming. This structure also doesn’t work well with certain story types such as Voyage and Return, Rebirth, or Comedy.

When to use it: Action-packed stories, Overcoming the Monster plots, or Quest plots

Examples: Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern, World War Z by Max Brooks, or Red Queen by Victoria Aveyard

The Hero’s Journey:

Another common plot structure that is seen in modern novels (especially western literature), and can be combined with the Fichtean Curve. Often, modern novels are a combination of the two. What makes the Hero’s Journey unique is that the protagonist must go through a literal or figurative death that completely transforms them. The death is usually, but not always, the climax of the story. Another key difference in The Hero’s Journey is that the protagonist must atone for their past rather than overcome it or move on without going back.

Why it’s good: Allows for great character development in character-strong stories.

Why it’s bad: Nearly every western novel, film, or TV show (successful and unsuccessful) uses this plot structure. It’s a little overdone, but if you can put a good personal twist on it, it can work out just fine.

When to use it: First-person stories, stories with small casts, Voyage and Return plots, or Rebirth plots

Examples: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, The Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan, or Divergent by Veronica Roth

In Media Res

Latin for “in the middle of things”, In Media Res is a unique plot structure. Rather than start with an exposition that builds up to the action, In Media Res starts right in the middle of the story. If you were to start your story at the second or third crisis point of the Fichtean Curve, you would get In Media Res.

Why It’s Good: Dropping people in the middle of the action will hook the right from the beginning.

Why It’s Bad: Starting with the action can be disorienting for readers. Make sure you fill in the backstory as the plot moves on.

When to Use It: Stories with small casts, Crime plots, or Mystery plots

Examples: Hatchet by Gary Paulsen, The Lord of the Flies by William Golding, or The Iliad by Homer

There are plenty more plot structures, but these are the main four, and all others are based off these in some way. Keep in mind that most stories use a combination of these plot structures, so you don’t have to stick to just one.

Thanks again for your question! If you need help with anything else writing related, feel free to send in another ask. Happy writing!

- Mod Kellie


If you need advice on general writing or fanfiction, you should maybe ask us!

I really want CW to do a BatFam live-action TV series. Like, I have this five-season structure all worked out in my head:

  • Start with Batman working with Dick Grayson. You probably want to have their partnership be a few years old because Dick’s canonically the longest running and closest to Batman of the Robins, but you can throw in cute flashback episodes showing his recruitment
  • Have Catwoman be a recurring antagonist/neutral figure throughout the series, with copious amounts of flirting.
  • Establish the character of Barbara Gordon early season 1, and give all these little hints at what she’ll become, then have her take up Batgirl season 2- sort of like what the Flash did with Cisco.
  • Bring in Bat Woman around Season 2-ish, give her a nice LGBT plotline, and have some fun with her and Batman’s mutual secret identities.
  • Have a plotline about Dick’s desire to go his own way that culminates in him taking up the identity of Nightwing. Maybe give him a spin-off if he’s popular enough?
  • Have Bruce recruit Jason Todd as the new Robin early Season 3 because he misses Dick, but make it clear Jason is much more angry/impulsive.
  • The villain of Season 3 is the Joker. Mid-season, Barbara is paralyzed from the waist down. Give her an good, respectful plot arc recovering physically and mentally that culminates in taking up the mantle of Oracle in the finale and being vital in defeating the Joker.
  • Have the Joker brutally murder Jason  a few episodes before the finale. This culminates in a harrowing conclusion where Batman must decide whether to kill the Joker or imprison him.
  • Season 3 or 4, depending on how episode spacing works out, introduce an mysterious assassin figure. At first she seems like an antagonist, but later she saves the life of a main character and introduces herself as Cassandra Cain. She’s adopted into the Bat Family and becomes the new Batgirl with Oracle’s blessing.
  • Season 4, bring in Tim Drake, and have a long plot arc where Batman doesn’t want to put anyone else at risk, until Tim manages to become Robin mid-season.
  • Give Tim have a love interest named Stephanie who’s secretive about her own family, later revealing her father’s the Cluemaster. She takes over for either Robin or Batgirl for an episode before creating her own identity as Spoiler.
  • The theme of Season 4? Parents. Parallel the shitty parenting of Steph and Cass, and have them bond over it. Put in some episodes of Batwoman and her strained relationship with her own father. Use the opportunity to emphasize the parental role Bruce has found himself in, and that after Season 3 he doesn’t want to fail his kids again.
  • Season 5′s main villains are the League of Assassins. Establish Talia Al’Ghul as an old flame of Bruce’s, and at the end of her first episode have a cliffhanger with her ten-year-old son Damian.
  • Introduce the recurring villain Red Hood, and later reveal he’s Jason Todd, resurrected by Ra’s Al Ghul via the Lazarus Pit.
  • Have Damian join the Bat Family mid season. Have Batman disappear/be killed for a bit, and Nightwing come back and take over as Batman for a few eps, with Damian taking over as Robin. Have his run as Batman contested by Jason, who views his morals as constraining and antiquated.
  • Eventually bring Bruce back, have him succeed at bringing Jason into the fold, have Catwoman finally come down on his side, and give it all an epic finale with the entire Bat Family.

Bonus points for race-blind casting (especially for all those black-haired Robins!) and copious amounts of crossovers between BatFam members and the other superhero shows.

Midheaven Signs

aries: You adopt a bold attitude towards your career. You meet a challenge and you are extremely excited and filled when you start a new project. Being self-employed gives you satisfaction.

taurus: Security counts. You need to do something tangible in your career and whatever form it is, you need to receive substantial rewards.

gemini: You need diversity in your career, and communicate your ideas.

cancer: You need a career in which you can use your intuition, connect emotionally, and provide for the safety of your family.

Leo: You need a career that has two qualities: creative opportunities, and public recognition.

Virgo: You will succeed in your career, whatever it is, because you “do your homework” and because you pay attention to detail.

Libra: You want to have a pleasant and rational career that will allow you to find the balance between your private life and your public life. According to you, the ideal would be a career in the arts. You attract people who can help you achieve your goals.

Scorpio: You are attracted by a career that offers you the opportunity to exert power or feel intensely. Once you have chosen a specific goal, you are determined to reach it.

Sagittarius: You are happiest with a career that provides you with independence, the opportunity to broaden your horizons on the mental plane, and many trips.

Capricorn: You are reliable and responsible. To maintain your optimism, you need a career that brings you a structure, regular work hours, and above all clear signs that you are progressing.

Aquarius: You take an independent and very personal attitude towards the career. The ideal career for you is exceptional and unconventional, it is something that only you can achieve.

Pisces: Compassion and / or imagination determine your career choices. You may be attracted by the assistance professions, or by a prestigious area such as music or dance. In either case, your intuition and your mediumistic abilities guide you.

The Work Environment

Aries in the 6th house: A fast paced workspace is preferred. Often these people are very hardworking, energetic and efficient and prefer to work in teams. This may cause conflict between them and coworkers, however, as they tend to favour the role of the leader and may become too controlling at times.

Taurus in the 6th house: These individuals work best in a slow paced environment, where they are able to concentrate on one task at hand. Though, there may be a lack of focus if their surroundings grow to be too peaceful. There may be a tendency to lean towards laziness. Altogether, these people are steady and deliberate, often enjoying themselves most when they are able to work with their hands.

Gemini in the 6th house: The work environment must constantly be busy. Growing bored quite easily, these individuals must be stimulated in order to remain interested and focused. They have lots of creative energy and are often overflowing with ideas. Despite their love for knowledge and learning, these people may not do too well in a structured environment and are prone to slacking off.

Cancer in the 6th house: With this placement, the work environment must be comfortable. Caring with coworkers, they are hardly ever domineering or bossy. These individuals may be rather sensitive or emotional when dealing with issues, so it is important that their surroundings are steady and calm in ought to aid their rational thinking processes.

Leo in the 6th house: These people feel as if they must constantly be in charge. They are most satisfied when their work environment is organised, efficient and running accordingly to how they desire. Perhaps somewhat dominant, these individuals take great pride in their work and may unintentionally set extremely high standards for those around them. They are generally very enthusiastic and goal-oriented when it comes to their tasks.

Virgo in the 6th house: It is very important that their surroundings are quiet, giving them room to think. It is highly unlikely that the work they do has no practical application, or is utterly thoughtless. Their minds must be stimulated. Extremely detail oriented, these individuals may overlook the bigger picture at times, causing them to stress. There might also be the tendency to overwork, which can result in an upset bodily function or illness.

Libra in the 6th house: A balanced and peaceful work environment is largely preferred over one that is chaotic. A workspace where they are able to socialise and connect with others is important. Typically, these people are very artistic. They may also have the tendency to become inefficient or lazy.

Scorpio in the 6th house: These individuals work best alone and in a quiet environment. They are very serious in regards to their work and are also quite the strategists. Often fixated on their goals, they may be prone to growing obsessed with their work. To their coworkers, they can come off as very intense.

Sagittarius in the 6th house: With this placement, the individual must be constantly stimulated. A fast paced environment is more suited to them than anything else. They are often very knowledgeable deep thinkers, yet may deal with work in a manner that is too lighthearted and careless.

Capricorn in the 6th house: A very structured, stable work environment is preferred. These people are often extremely self-disciplined and focused, and despise nothing quite as much as wasting their time. They are very practical and responsible, though may develop workaholic tendencies if they are not careful.

Aquarius in the 6th house: These people typically enjoy a work environment where ideas are shared openly and creatively, and individuals within the workspace are able to perform tasks in a collaborative manner. Despite their liking towards a more interactive style, they are highly independent and may prefer to do things in their own way. This might be bothersome to coworkers. 

Pisces in the 6th house: These individuals generally like to have their own different schedule and may be particularly sensitive to the way that their work is completed. They enjoy feeling good about the outcome of their work, which could be directly tied to their emotions. If their career, or simply their day-to-day routine, is not fulfilling, this may be deeply saddening to them.

Self care is good for the skin

My mental health has a huge impact on my physical health, and of course my skin and acne. I have to be mindful to keep my stress levels low in order to be happy and healthy. Here are just a couple of self care tips that I use.

1. get a cup of tea. Fruit tea, green tea, camomile tea, spearmint tea are all good options for your skin. ☕️

2. Go for a walk. Often if I’m feeling down about my skin or something I just wallow in my room, a quick walk round the block really does me good. 🏃‍♀️

3. Appreciate things. If you see a rainbow stop and stare, if you spot a cute cat stop and play with it. Slow yourself down. Allow yourself to stop and appreciate things.🌈

4. Talk to someone. Your parents, partner or friend or whoever, talk to them about how your feeling that day. Or just chat about tv shows or the weather. Talking to people helps me feel less alone and just overall more positive.👭

5. Journal. Whether it’s a skin journal or an emotions journal or just accounts of your day it’s good to get it out on paper. You can throw the paper away if you need to after but writing it out feels cathartic.📔

6. Write out your routine. From skincare to brushing your teeth. Write out what you do and what order you do it in for the morning and nighttime. This stops you from forgetting things and gives you a structure to work to. 🗓

7. Try meditation or yoga. This might not be your thing but just try it. There’s lots of beginner guides on YouTube.💆

8. Have you remembered all you medication? Take your meds and supplements if you haven’t. They could be contributing to you feeling low. 💊

9. Water. It’s an easy way to help your body and skin. Drink your water. 💧

10. Go to bed on time. Beauty sleep is real people. You’ll be helping your health and your skin by getting an early night.🛌

PSA white people

Your mental illness does not change your privilege as a white person

Your sexual orientation does not change your privilege as a white person

Your gender does not change your privilege as a white person

Your income does not change your privilege as a white person

Your disability does not change your privilege as a white person

Your age does not change your privilege as a white person.

Your political affiliation does not change your privilege as a white person

Your religion does not change your privilege as a white person

Your privilege as a white person will stick with you, whatever your other identities are. You may face oppression in other ways, which, YES means there are other social structures that work against you. But they do not diminish your white privilege

Disclaimer: I have never taken a non-science college class. Meaning, I have no idea how to take notes for humanities or social sciences. Not saying this method won’t work for that, just that I can’t guarantee it will. Also, this method is not about achieving pretty notes, only structured practical notes.

What you’ll need:

  • Notebook. I use a notebook. Most people I know use a notebook. Why should YOU use a notebook?
    • You won’t get as many handouts (if any) as in highschool.
    • Professors won’t ask to see hw in your notebook. For all they care, your notes could be a comic about the class. As long as you pass, you do you.
    • You don’t have as many classes in a day so even if you carry around notebooks, your bag won’t be all that heavy.
    • You can divide it into three sections: class notes, seminar notes/work and lab work. All in one for your studying comfort.
    • Professors WILL reference that formula from 3 classes ago and when you have no idea wtf they’re talking about, you can just flip a few pages.
    • Seriously, no one in your class wants to hear you snap loose leaf paper out of your ring binder.
    • And let’s be honest, your notes are going to get jumbled up any other way.
    • If you’re taking a continuation class and you’ll need to revise from these notes, it’s much easier to pull out a notebook than to look through the thousands of notes from all your classes and try to figure out which are the ones you need and what is the correct order.
  • Two pens, three tops. Blue for general notes, black for sections and the other color for subsections or underlining. Go for black for general note taking if you want to (I do it too sometimes) but blue strains your eyes less.

In class:

  • Structuring notes: not every structure works for every subject and professor so you should figure out a method for each one. That said, I usually start out with a basic structure and then tweak it along the way to better suit my needs:
    1. The name of the unit should be your ‘big title’. ‘ORGANELLES’
    2. Every ‘big topic’ (very easy to identify – usually the professor will make it really clear that you’re moving on to a different topic or it’ll be on the slides) inside the unit is assigned a number. ‘3. Mitochondria’
    3. Every ’big aspect’ of that topic is a subtopic. ‘3.4. Structure’.
    4. If there are even more sub subtopics, continue with the numeration system. Otherwise proceed to use bullet points for any enumerations. If there are enumerations inside these enumerations (wow enumerception), change your symbol for each level. Instead of bullet points you can use dashes, squares, spirals, Xs…
    5. The exception for this is when the enumeration corresponds to steps in a process. In that case, I number each step and circle the number.
    6. For each level you descend, indent your text. It’ll be easier to not get lost. Skip this if you’re working with a small notebook and you’re afraid of running out of pages.
    7. Sticky notes are your best friend. Does some random piece of info the professor just decided was important enough to be mentioned not fit into your very methodic structure? No problem, add a sticky note. Cute + calls attention to it, so you won’t forget.

Keep reading

Autobots’ Military Structure

EXPLAINED

For Generation One, at least. The Autobots do seem to follow a strict military structure. With references to officers, special operations units, intelligence, as well as various specialist in their fields. 

I am going to attempt to explain how this structure works and how many of the top ranking Autobots fall into and their actual positions other than the generic “officer” title. 

Let’s start from the bottom and work our way up.

Enlisted personnel: E1 - E6

These would be your more basic soldiers. You’re “frontliner” if you will. These are the ranks where most of the grunt work comes from. They often have no say in the command they are assigned and are strictly there to follow orders and do their job. Not to say there is no authority within these position, but they are the most common. 

E1s are the fresh from bootcamp soldiers. Which Grimlock and his team would be. Making them the lowest ranking Autobots right next to the Aerialbots. Though with their own unique cybertronian military structure, the Aerialbots’ gestalt leader would likely have been advanced to that of an E6, without the usual preamble of time in rank and qualification tests. Same with the Dinobots’ Grimlock. As an E6 is typically put in charge of small groups, squadrons or units. One step below and actual Chief/Gunnery Sargeant. Which we will get to next.

Enlisted personnel: E7 - E9

These are your Chiefs/First Sergeants/Master Gunnery Sergeant/Marines have too many names for the same rank. They are held in high regard and are positions of authority. They are often tasked with the real work of the . Making decisions and commanding the army on a more personal level than that of an officer. They take a direct role with the lower enlisted personnel. 

 It also explains why a seasoned veteran like Kup would take direction from someone as seemingly inexperienced as Hot Rod. As while a Master Chief/Master Gunnery Sergeant ( E9 ) is one of the most respected and revered of ranks. As they are titles earned by only the best of the best and only after putting in many, many years of service. Even a fresh to the service Ensign would outrank him. As all officers outranks all enlisted personnel regardless of time spent serving.

Also, yes Bumblebee is a Chief. 

Warrant Officers: W1 - W5

Warrant officers are rare, as it it more difficult to become a Warrant Officer than any other rank. Barring that of the highest officer ranks. They do not hold actual sway over the direction the army goes unless it pertains to their own specialization.  Within the army itself, Warrant Officers are highly respected and revered for their skill. 

They are subject experts in their chosen field. No one knows more than they do about their particular topic. With Ironhide, it would be weapons. Meaning he is the point of reference for all things involving weaponry within the Autobot army. The same would be for Wheeljack within the scientific side of the war effort. Blaster for communications, etc. This explains that while they obviously hold authority and their opinions are so highly regarded by the Prime. While they don’t hold an actual command over the army as a whole. Though this does vary for cybertronians. As Ironhide has been placed in charge due to the high death rate of the Autobot army officers and there being a lack of qualified officers to fill a command role.

Officers: O1 - O4

These would be the Junior Officers. Your Ensigns to your Lieutenant Commanders. Not much experience is needed for theses ranks and they joined by way of contract and specialized schooling. This is not to say those who have these ranks are to be disrespected. They hold authority over even the most senior of enlisted soldiers. They also can be appointed positions of higher authority than their rank would typically allow. Depending on skill set and how they present themselves as an asset to the command they are assigned.


Officers: O5 - O6

Your Captains and Commanders. Captain does not automatically mean they are in charge of a ship. They hold that capability, but do not always act as the XO (Executive Officer) of a vessel. These are the second rarest next to Warrant Officers. Usually, they are the highest ranking at a command. With the exception of a Flag Ship, which the Ark arguably is. The hold the utmost Authority over a command. With Ratchet this would be the medbay of the Ark. Though with within the medical field reaching such a high rank is rare, meaning he would be the point of contact and set standards as far as all medbays within the army are to uphold. 

Officers: O7 - O11

The leaders. Admirals. Though with cybertronian variants of the term. They take ultimate responsibility over the entire army. Their orders are not questioned and their authority absolute. With Fleet Admiral (O11) being the rank of Prime. Giving Optimus Prime a special kind of authority, though only during times of war. Where their call is the ultimate call, even over other Admiral’s. 

Elita-1 would be a Four Star Admiral. Giving her command over the war effort still ongoing on Cybertron. Then there is Prowl and Jazz, who fall in the middle. With Prowl being a three star and Jazz either two or one. This would make them report and be accountable to none other except Optimus Prime, as they are part of the Ark crew and the command on earth. However were they to be reassigned to Cybertron, it would still be Optimus Prime, but also Elita-1 right after him. 

Special Warfare Combatant-craft Crewmen: S.W.C.C

The all-stars. Especially the Wreckers, which could be equated to that of a Navy Seal. So when they have the lower ranked bots excited for the Wreckers, treating them like celebrities. It’s actually a fairly accurate representation. These are the soldiers with the strongest wills and best skill sets to carry out a mission. They still have to adhere to rank, same as the enlisted soldiers, but they are given their own specific commander. And when an enlisted soldier meets one, even if it’s only for a few minutes, it’s all that soldier will talk about for the next several weeks. (Not an exaggeration)

Then you have the HUMINT agents, the ones who gather the intelligence and spy. Though the army wouldn’t actually call it spying. Though they cybertronian equivalent would likely be called CYBINT. As this stands for cybertronian intelligence gathering. Meaning they get up close and personal with the enemy. Their identities are often not known. Though even an agent with a blown cover can still be useful. Especially if they have the unique ability to become invisible or create holograms.


There. 

Now, if there are any questions regarding this, mun is free to answer them. This wasn’t overly detailed, as there are special nuances to each rank, within that rank. Such as rates. Which seem cybertronians seem to differentiate from conventional norms on that front. There is no “science” rate. Though the officer’s positions being mostly political outside times of war they got spot on.