strathlachlan

Old Castle Lachlan was built in the 13th century though much of the ruins today date from the 15th century. It was the stronghold of Clan MacLachlan until 1746 when it was attacked by a British Government warship. Though little damage was done, its occupants fled, and it was never again occupied. New Lachlan Castle was built as a replacement in 1790, around 1 kilometer to the north-east.

  Old Lachlan Castle is on the bank of Loch Fyne, a sea loch on the west coast of Argyll and Bute, Scotland.

The Phantom Horse of Old Castle Lachlan

Lachlan McLachan, the clan chief, was one of the few Jacobite Lairds to actually fall at the Battle of Culloden in 1746.  His surviving clansmen staggered back to Strathlachlan after the battle and on the way, the dead chief’s riderless horse broke away from the survivors and galloped toward home, swimming across Loch Fyne to the castle. As a result, the horse was first to bring news of the catastrophe to the rest of the clan. The horse thereafter took up residence in the ruins of the castle. To this day, tales are told of hearing the whinney of a horse coming from the ruins.

Old Lachlan Castle even had its own mythical brownie, Master Harry, to look after the clan. Before the Battle of Culloden, the brownie gave a prophecy that the chief would not return, a vision that indeed came true.

The Old Castle Lachan was built in the 13th century though much of the ruins today date from the 15th century. It was the stronghold of Clan MacLachlan until 1746 when it was attacked by a British Government warship. Though little damage was done, its occupants fled, and it was never again occupied. New Lachlan Castle was built as a replacement in 1790, around 1 kilometer to the north-east.

Old Castle Lachlan is on the bank of Loch Fyne, a sea loch on the west coast of Argyll and Bute, Scotland.