stranger conversation

My Squad and the Most Important Skills to Learn

INTP: Polite conversation with strangers (especially in a service job, can save your ass multiple times)

INFP: Not to spill their guts when they’re nervous (if you’re uncomfortable, no one will knock you for dropping out of a conversation)

INFJ: Care less about what people think of them (you don’t have to sacrifice your happiness for everyone)

ISTP: Just be yourself, you’re fucking awesome (seriously, your ideas are dope and your choices are valid)

ESTJ: Stop fighting with everyone (ffs please)

ENFP: Stop letting people use them (that dude you’re obsessed with doesn’t care about you)

INTJ: Control their facial expressions (you’re inadvertently scary sometimes)

anonymous asked:

Highly, highly recommend Appassionato by chonideno. Honestly one of the best things I've ever read. Her writing is superb, enchanting, amazing, basically every other positive adjective.

It was actually the first fic rec posted on this blog! You can find the post here. Thank you for the rec!

Appassionato by chonideno ( PG | 2/2 | 35,859 )

Alec plays the piano every day, with great talent. One night, a note slips under his door: it’s a request from an anonymous neighbor. Before he knows it, Alec picks up the habit of leaving his window open so his neighbor can listen to him. Requests keep coming. Slowly, two strangers start a conversation without words and let the music do the work for them.

being shy and having resting bitch face is the worst combination because i look like a disinterested bitch but in reality i really want to socialize but i just dont know how to initiate conversation with strangers and also this is just my face

How to casually start a conversation with a really hot stranger
  1. Walk towards them excitedly and lightly punch their shoulder
  2. Say “Oh my god heyyyyy! Can’t believe it’s you! I haven’t seen you in a while!”
  3. They will respond by saying “Uh…sorry do I know you?”
  4. You have to pretend to be shocked and confused upon hearing those words.
  5. Suddenly say “OH SHIT! FUCK, WHAT YEAR IS THIS?!”
  6. They will respond by telling you the current year.
  7. Slowly back away and say “Oh crap I’m too early. We haven’t met yet. Ugh, forget this ever happened. Hello stranger. You don’t know me. Bye stranger”
  8. Take pleasure in their confusion and proceed to do your little cute laugh when they come up to you and ask “this is a joke right”
  9. Casually sacrifice them to Satan if they don’t find you funny
i’m ready to break, you’re ready to bend

for @eggo-my-leggo, thanks for motivating me ely :)

read on ao3

tw: implied/referenced child abuse

Steve walked down the road quickly.  His eyes were burning, but he wasn’t sure how much of that was from the cold.  It was freezing, and he tucked his hands under his armpits before the fell off.  Winter in Indiana was always shitty, but in the evening it was even worse.

“Why the hell couldn’t you have grabbed your jacket, Harrington?” he muttered angrily at himself under his breath.

Keep reading

10

Nine years of painting in a sketchbook

As a freshman in art school I cringed when I was told that students were required to keep a sketchbook. I never draw preparatory sketches because I like to work a painting out as I go, not in advance. When shown a finished artwork and its original sketch, I usually find the first draft to be more spontaneous, energetic, fresh and beautiful. But I was an obedient student so I forced my hand and began drawing in a Moleskine journal.

Drawing in public places always led to striking up conversations with strangers and helped me to make friends outside of school. I began drawing and experimenting on a daily basis. I bought acrylic ink for a school assignment and poured some into my sketchbook using an eye dropper. I liked how the ink bled onto other pages, adding color and texture. I fell in love with the medium and started drawing with ink using a dip pen and brush.

It’s difficult to use dip pens, brushes and ink jars while sitting in a cafe, so I began painting in my room. The privacy loosened me up and my themes became more personal. For years I was in the habit of punctuating paintings with song lyrics, but I finally started using my own poetry. After a while, I grew so invested in the sketchbooks that I began referring to them as “books of paintings” to imply they were complete, indivisible artworks.

I used to surf the internet to find images to draw, but that became boring because I kept googling the same things: antelope, construction cranes and light houses were among my usual search terms. In 2011 I got into photography and started using my own photos for reference. Now I exclusively paint scenes from memory or personal photographs.

Change is so gradual it’s hard to tell if I’m improving at all, so occasionally I flip through my collection of Moleskines. I think the most important creative change was the decision to stop copying images from the internet and other people’s poetry. This really opened me up creatively and I’ve become more observant of my surroundings– time spent outside of studio feels creative and productive because I always have an eye out for material.