story-sketches

If you shout FIYEROOOOOO as long and loud as you can, you’ll get the full effect. The movement isn’t perfect yet, but I’m very happy with this first draft!

This is not really a drawing, but I want to tell the story about all of this. I got so much people saying: “this is so simple (but cool)” and I am really appreciate it. But the in real life before I get to this really simple and cute drawing I have to go through the long way to the thing that I really like. The point is it might look simple, but don’t think this takes less time then bigger drawings😌

Uncle Gerry’s Family Fun Zone

by reddit user Red_Grin

This is a lengthy story but it is worth it:

I didn’t know Will could draw, I remember thinking as my friend’s hand quickly moved across the page. And then I looked more closely at Will’s impromptu sketch, and I immediately regretted it. I tried to unsee it. I shifted my attention to other things around me, anything at all that wasn’t ink on the page: the blur of Will’s hand, the beads of sweat gathering at his temples, the gentle autumn breeze creeping through the crack of the window.

Don’t look at the page. Just don’t look at it.

But I knew I had to. So I looked. And it was worse than I expected. Much worse.

Keep reading

Olan Rogers:

I’ve posted about this amazing man once or twice but I wanted to make an official textpost as a shoutout to him. He’s a comedian with videos on YouTube of stories and sketches. His stories are what hooked me, though. They’re hilarious and fun and amazing! His videos are like Pringles. Once one pops, one just can’t stop. When you watch one, you binge! “Just one more” is a lie. And he’s not too difficult to look at, if you know what I mean.

His most popular video is called Ghost In The Stalls. This gif is from the video…

Originally posted by idk-crocs

I suggest these stories: 

Ghost In The Stalls, Echoes Through The Wall, Christmas Time Boy (live story), The Comeback Kid, The Package Delivery, The Bad Apple, A Thief In The Night, The Popcorn King, The Snack Thief, It’s In The Genes, Eyes For You, The Fear Awakened, The Batman Birthday, An Odd Day To Die, Death Is A Quiet Wave, Midnight Claw, Chuck E. Cheese, Stand By Me, and last but certainly not least, The Crumb That Fell.

His Channel Link: [x]

supersquiddy  asked:

Werid question but how do you get your traditional artwork to look so smooth but also sketchy? If that makes sense.

My main things are (this turned out to be a lot longer than I thought! Srry!)

Loose lines: draw with your whole arm if you can! (drawing anchored to your wrist can lead to Carpal tunnel syndrome.. and no one wants that)

Full lines: try to keep your lines fluid, fast and long (as opposed to short and scratchy lines that make one big line) look for YouTube videos on gesture drawing! Get things down quick and flesh them out later, usually the first thing we mark down will be the most accurate when doing gestures!

Sketch lightly: use heavy lines sparingly! They can really define a sketch but be sparing, there can be too much of a good thing. I always start sketches almost invisibly light to map out the bare bones of my drawings! Then because they’re so light, you don’t have to erase them if you don’t want to!

Shapes: shapes r your friends!! 🌸 use shapes to get the (figurative or literal) skeleton down!! Almost anything can be boiled down to basic shapes!

REFERENCE: IT! IS! OK! TO! REFERENCE! I can’t stress this enough, free reference photo databases are just a google away! Learn that anatomy fam! Even if you’re doing cartoons, it will be so much easier with the anatomical knowledge! Also, I have no problem with learning artists referencing my art when starting out with drawing.. 2 RULES TO REFERENCING PRE-EXISTING ART: 1) don’t claim it’s your art. 2) ask the artist if it’s cool first! Some aren’t okay with it and ya gotta respect it! ❤Also try to get off the crutch of referencing pre-existing art quickly! Referencing art helps you practice, but nothing beats referencing from real, organic life, because that’s where your style will come out.

Simplify: esp. pertaining to expressions, the more you complicate things, the harder it will be for it to read. It will get lost among the busyness. Look at the drawing as a whole as opposed to only paying attention for details. Don’t be concerned with making a masterpiece!! Sketchbooks should be messy!

Get back to basics: anatomy, colour theory and the elements of design!!! they help a whole heck of a lot!!! Never be satisfied with your knowledge of these basic things bc you learned them in like kindergarten,, okay????

A(cting)RT: you can convey a LOT if you have the mindset of telling a story with your sketch!

Cheap: don’t worry abt using fancy shmancy supplies! I get mine from the dollar store (sketchbook, erasers and mechanical pencils! Definitely get good paper if ur using copics or high quality markers but like I literally only sketch traditionally w pencil… ) I find I’m so scared to use expensive sketchbooks that I hardly draw in them and I hate everything I draw. I go through like 1 or more sketchbooks a month so… that would rack up quick if I was using like $20.00 sketchbooks instead of $2.00 ones.

Listen: Listen to music or podcasts or audio books or drawing tutorials if it helps!! It can sometimes even influence the mood of your drawing :0

Sketch often: every day if you can!! It’s a good habit if you want to get better!! And therapeutic!!!

Accept CONSTRUCTIVE criticism!!: It’s not an insult! It’s someone else’s view! Get critiqued often! And actually listen!! Know the difference between constructive and destructive!! Also join a community! Meet other artist! Collaborate! Art isn’t a competition! ❤

quick round!

Study art history: they’re famous for a reason!

Draw inspiration from everywhere!

When referencing, draw what you see, not what you know!

Think about drawing in 3D, more like it’s sculpting instead of drawing! Everything is made of flat plains and will cast shadows!!

If you’re up to it, challenge yourself! You’ll only get better if you step out of your comfort zone! Try to draw one new thing each sketching session!

Lastly

Don’t stress!: most important drawing tip! Drawing is supposed to be fun and therapeutic because it doesn’t have to be anything! All art is art and everyone who makes art is an artist, it’s not some exclusive club, we all start somewhere! This is your art journey! Enjoy the ride!

I know you just wanted to know about how I sketch but I couldn’t help myself!!! Sorry! Hope this helps! 🌸
-hanna ❤

Drafting: The Theory of Shitty First Drafts

Writing books often exhort you to “write a shitty first draft,” but I always resisted this advice. After all,

  1. I was already writing shitty drafts, even when I tried to write good ones. Why go out of my way to make them shittier?
  2. A shitty first draft just kicks the can down the road, doesn’t it? Sooner or later, I’d have to write a good draft—why put it off?
  3. If I wrote without judging what I wrote, how would I make any creative choices at all?
  4. That first draft inevitably obscured my original vision, so I wanted it to be at least slightly good.
  5. Writing something shitty meant I was shitty.

So for years, I kept writing careful, cramped, painstaking first drafts—when I managed to write at all. At last, writing became so joyless, so draining, so agonizing for me that I got desperate: I either needed to quit writing altogether or give the shitty-first-draft thing a try.

Turns out everything I believed about drafting was wrong.

For the last six months, I’ve written all my first drafts in full-on don’t-give-a-fuck mode. Here’s what I’ve learned so far:

“Shitty first draft” is a misnomer

A rough draft isn’t just a shitty story, any more than a painter’s preparatory sketch is just a shitty painting. Like a sketch, a draft is its own kind of thing: not a lesser version of the finished story, but a guide for making the finished story.

Once I started thinking of my rough drafts as preparatory sketches, I stopped fretting over how “bad” they were. Is a sketch “bad”? And actually, a rough draft can be beautiful the same way a sketch is beautiful: it has its own messy energy.

Don’t try to do everything at once

People who make complex things need to solve one kind of problem before they can solve others. A painter might need to work out where the big shapes go before they can paint the details. A writer might need to decide what two people are saying to each other before they can describe the light in the room or what those people are doing with their hands.

I’d always embraced this principle up to a point. In the early stages, I’d speculate and daydream and make messy notes. But that freedom would end as soon as I started drafting. When you write a scene, I thought, you have to start with the first word and write the rest in order. Then it dawned on me: nobody would ever see this! I could write the dialogue first and the action later; or the action first and the dialogue later; or some dialogue and action first and then interior monologue later; or I could write the whole thing like I was explaining the plot to my friend over the phone. The draft was just one very long, very detailed note to myself. Not a story, but a preparatory sketch for a story. Why not do it in whatever weird order made sense to me?

Get all your thoughts onto the page

Here’s how I used to write: I’d sit there staring at the screen and I’d think of something—then judge it, reject it, and reach for something else, which I’d most likely reject as well—all without ever fully knowing what those things were. And once you start rejecting thoughts, it’s hard to stop. If you don’t write down the first one, or the second, or the third, eventually your thought-generating mechanism jams up. You become convinced you have no thoughts at all.

When I compare my old drafts with my new ones, the old ones look coherent enough. They’re presentable as stories. But they suck as drafts, because I can’t see myself thinking in them. I have no idea what I wanted that story to be. These drafts are opaque and airless, inscrutable even to me, because a good 90% of what I was thinking while I wrote them never made it onto the page.

These days, most of my thoughts go onto the page, in one form or another. I don’t waste time figuring out how to say something, I just ask, “what are you trying to say here?” and write that down. Because this isn’t a story, it’s a plan for a story, so I just need the words to be clear, not beautiful. The drafts I write now are full of placeholders and weird meta notes, but when I read them, I can see where my mind is going. I can see what I’m trying to do. Consequently, I no longer feel like my drafts obscure my original vision. In fact, their whole purpose is to describe that vision.

Drafts are memos to future-you

To draft effectively, you need a personal drafting style or “language” to communicate with your future self (who is, of course, the author of your second draft). This language needs to record your ideas quickly so it can keep up with the pace of your imagination, but it needs to do so in a form that will make sense to you later. That’s why everyone’s drafts look different: your drafting style has to fit the way your mind works.

I’m still working mine out. Honestly, it might take a while. But recently, I started writing in fragments. That’s just how my mind works: I get pieces of sentences before I understand how to fit them together. Wrestling with syntax was slowing me down, so now I just generate the pieces and save their logical relationships for later. Drafting effectively means learning these things about yourself. And to do that, you can’t get all judgmental. You can’t fret over how you should be writing, you just gotta get it done.

Messy drafts are easier to revise

I find that drafting quickly and messily keeps the story from prematurely “hardening” into a mute, opaque object I’m afraid to change. I no longer do that thing, for instance, where I endlessly polish the first few paragraphs of a draft without moving on. Because how do you polish a bunch of fragments taped together with dashes? A draft that looks patently “unfinished” stays malleable, makes me want to dig my hands in and move stuff around.

You already have ideas

Sitting down to write a story, I used to feel this awful responsibility to create something good. Now I treat drafting simply as documenting ideas I already have—not as creation at all, but as observation and description. I don’t wait around for good words or good ideas. I just skim off whatever’s floating on the surface and write it down. It’s that which allows other, potentially better ideas to surface.

As a younger writer, my misery and frustration perpetuated themselves: suppressing so many thoughts made my writing cramped and inhibited, which convinced me I had no ideas, which made me even more afraid to write lest I discover how empty inside I really was. That was my fear, I guess: if I looked squarely at my innocent, unvetted, unvarnished ideas, I’d see how bad they truly were, and then I’d have to—what, pack up and go home? Never write again? I don’t know. But when I stopped rejecting ideas and started dumping them onto the page, the worst didn’t happen. In fact, it was a huge relief.


Next post: the practice of shitty first drafts

Ask me a question or send me feedback!

Got curious about how I’d redesign an old retired character of mine. I initially came up with him when I was 11 but could never get his story somewhere satisfactory.

I used to really be into werewolves when I was a kid/teenager, but the interest started to wane over time. I still think they’re cool but I felt less inclined to draw them. I might fiddle around a little more with it but I doubt I’ll return to his story.