stories: 2

Aperture is trying to tell me something I just know it

I love my grumpy gay flower friend 

anonymous asked:

IMO, the books and the show are both amazing, but I have to keep them as separate fandoms in my head because they differ in key ways. I like some of the new themes and elements they added into the story for the show, and I like all of the details in the books. So I think of book Sansa, Tyrion, Daenerys, etc. as different characters from their show counterparts.

We can definitely agree on that at this point, the characters in the show are completely different entities than the characters they were named after from GRRM’s series. 

But for me, if it was a situation where the TV series was loosely inspired by the novels, but the show writers were keeping consistent with the characters and the universe they were creating, I wouldn’t be as critical of GOT as I am. I would accept that this is a completely different series, as I already do, and engage with it based on that. For example, I don’t fault The Vampire Diaries TV show for having a completely different set of characters who go by the same names as their book counterparts. They are at least consistent with the characterization and development they’ve laid out (though the series in general isn’t above criticism). Unfortunately, as it stands, D&D are not consistent with the world, characters, and story they’re writing. Natalie Dormer was in five seasons of the show and played five completely different and conflicting characters who were all referred to as Margaery. Shae was a character they completely revamped and I enjoyed their version of her, yet in her last season they made their own character OOC just to fit the story needs. Consistency within their own narrative shouldn’t be this big of an issue for them.

  • Me, 7 weeks ago: Ah, I really hope the fanservice isn't too invasive and fetish-y. I mean they look good together but it's sort of tiring to see queerbait and absolutely no pay-off...
  • Me, now: Ah, I really hope Victor and Yuuri choose a nice location for their wedding and honeymoon, I mean there are so many beautiful places in the world to choose from...
Pixar Sequels and their Morals
  • Toy Story 2/3: Nothing lasts forever, so it's very important to cherish the things you love while they last while also knowing when to let go.
  • Monsters University: Life can sometimes put you down a different path than the one you prepared for yourself, but that's nothing to be scared of.
  • Finding Dory: Mental illnesses and disabilities are not inconveniences one should have to apologize to others for; others should learn to accept the disability and change their behaviors accordingly.
  • Cars 2/3: If people hate your franchise enough, cripple or kill off the main character to get people to start talking about it again.
Forever an immigrant

In 1996, my dad was assigned to go work overseas at Samsung’s new semiconductor chip manufacturing plant in Austin, Texas. Initially, he was hesitant to go. It would mean uprooting his entire life, and plus he didn’t want his children growing up losing sight of their Korean heritage. But they sent him anyway, and thus began our family’s strange, but exciting new life in America, born out of my dad’s enormous sacrifice.

There were language barrier issues and little culture shock mishaps since the beginning, sure. Since the first grade, I remember starting off every new school year with a plea to not to embarrass myself by messing anything up with my English, to not give away the fact that I was different in any way from my classmates. But my dad’s fears came true as I gradually became more comfortable speaking English to my friends than speaking Korean at home. I knew the conversion became complete as soon as I started dreaming and thinking in English. It made my school life easier for me at the time, but looking back on it now, I wish I hadn’t been so quick to try to assimilate.

My mom and dad moved back to Korea when I left for college, their parental duties having been fulfilled by giving their kids that “coveted” American education. That’s why it came as such a shock to me when they casually dropped a bombshell — after 20 years of forming my life and identity in the US, they wanted me to come back to Korea after graduation. To them, it was expected that their kids would learn everything they could from America, then return to Korea and make use of what they’d learned.

I fought, cried, and argued with them for months. I was finally ready to enter the world I had worked so hard to be accepted by, and this felt like wiping out right before the finish line. Then, three months before graduation, my dad had a stroke and the decision was made for me. I finished school early and decided to forego the graduation ceremony because I knew what I had to do — I would be going back to live with my parents, at least until my dad got better and I gained some sort of idea about what I wanted to do with my life. We made an informal deal that I would stick it out for three years, and give my birthplace a chance. And like a dutiful daughter, I did what they asked me to, working and living for three years in a country that was now as foreign as America first was to me in 1996.

People in Korea often ask gyopos (Korean-Americans), “Which do you like better, Korea or America?” They look at me expectantly, jealousy in their eyes for my fluent English and American citizenship. I don’t know what answer they’re looking for. I usually laugh and give my stock response, one I’ve picked up from hearing so many times: “Korea is the most fun Hell, but America is the most boring Heaven.” It’s a desperate, vague attempt to appease both of my identities. Looking back on my words now, I’m ashamed. How did I live my life thinking this, so blissfully unaware? After the events of last night, I can no longer think of America as the heaven I once thought it was.

Three lonely but eye-opening years passed. I experienced the beautiful and ugly sides of Korea, traveled to nearby countries in Asia, and saw how privileged I was to be able to live this dual life. After I finally saved up enough money to move back on my own and secured a job in America, I made the leap. For the most part, repatriation has been a smooth transition, but I’m consumed by guilt and dread for the future when I think about the aging parents I left behind in Korea. Though they gave their reluctant blessing to let me have the life and career I’ve longed to have in America, their worries are ever-looming in the back of my mind. I want to prove to them that they made the right decision, but every day is a struggle to convince my parents that I am okay here, that I’m safe in a country 7,000 miles away from them. And now in the wake of Trump’s victory, the implications that a deeply racist nation elected him make it harder for me to justify my living here to them.

The past few years for me have been the most accelerated crash-course in learning what it means to be Korean-American, and last night felt like a “fuck you” to everyone who looks like me. An Asian immigrant, and a woman at that. It feels like the failed culmination of a 20-year struggle to fit in, of yearning to look like my white classmates, for someone to look at me and not think I’m completely out of place. I’m most afraid of people who I thought were my friends, but stayed silent and walked into the voting booth yesterday to cast a ballot for Trump. I knew America feared us, but this just confirmed it. It feels like a punch to the gut because it proves that my parents were right.

I’m lucky to have spent most of my formative years in California and to be currently living in the diversity of New York, but yesterday, my paranoia that the people around me don’t see me as part of their white America was confirmed. Even though my job has allowed me to surround myself with like-minded people, ultimately my carefully curated social media feed has allowed me to live this last election cycle in a bubble. But now that bubble has popped, and today feels like when the lights turn on at the club and you realize you’d been dancing with a dirty mop.

The most disturbing part about a Trump presidency is the fact that half the people who came out to vote agreed with a sexist, racist maniac — and half of all Americans stayed home and watched him get elected. And these people aren’t so visibly different from you, or me. Even the Hillary supporters right now, the ones who are looking for ways out by threatening to leave to Canada, are part of the problem. Now more than ever, we need white allies to step up and show their support for millions of Muslim, Black, Latino, Asian, and LGBTQ+ Americans who have always been — even more so today — living in fear. Something is incredibly broken when the immediate response to a new president-elect is “I’m scared.”

For the rest of us POCs, we have to keep living our lives and create art and make ourselves heard, because we can’t keep waiting around for America to do it for us. We’re a nation of immigrants and minorities, and we’re going to keep creating and building things that are going to be better than a fucking wall.

1: Ignore every thought of them until you have convinced yourself that they were never real and any feelings you had were misplaced. Remind yourself they were never yours to begin with, therefore the feelings you have are invalid so you can justify ignoring all thoughts of them.
2: Be fucking selfish as hell. Spoil yourself, who gives a shit. Go out and buy a shirt you never thought you could wear and wear it. Don’t feel bad about leaning on people when you need help. 
3: Don’t reminisce on what could have been, they don’t deserve a second thought. You might think romanticizing your feelings are harmless daydreams but they will bite you in the ass and leave you only wanting them more. Day dream about the steamy waffles you will buy for yourself later.
4: Remind yourself you are a strong person, like them, but only better. 5: Busy yourself with other things and people. Come home at 5 a.m. wasted, remind yourself that there are other people willing to give you the fucking time of day. Take up yoga, get a hobby, invest your time in that and in the process prove you can commit to things and accomplish great tasks. 
6: Protect yourself, never let your heart find itself in this situation again. Think back and try and pinpoint all the red flags you noticed, then try and apply that knowledge to future relationships. But don’t spend too much time analyzing where things went wrong. 
7: Remind yourself of the person you were before they came into your life. You have not changed, they have not destroyed you. Put effort into returning back into that person. 
8: The most important part is to keep telling yourself that you are wanted. Do not forget that you will get through this; this is temporary just like the short happiness you shared with them. Just because they do not want you does not mean you are unloveable or unfit for relationships.
—  Excerpt from a book I will never write #1202 // how to get over someone who was never yours // excerptsofstories 
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Dan and Phil play Pokémon GO! #2