stops time

The Problem with Modern Clown Breeding

Alright, this may be out of line, but there’s an elephant in the comically-undersized room and it’s high time we addressed it. Simply put, breed standards have become stringent to the point where inbreeding, and all the health issues that come with it, is rampant in the clown-showing circuit. Confused? Let me show you an example.

This is what a Belgian Spurthigh looked like in the late 1800s. Like most breeds in the Japing group, it was bred for function over form - those distinctive bony spurs on its hips, for example, protected the pelvis during particularly intense pratfalls. But over the last 100 years, we’ve exaggerated these features to a grotesque degree - take a look at the modern Belgian Spurthigh.

A single-minded focus on aesthetics has turned the breed into a warped caricature of its past self, and a veritable time bomb of health issues. Cataracts and hip dysplasia are so common that newly-hatched chucklets have to be tested for them, and the hip spurs are so pronounced in utero that they run the risk of puncturing the egg sac. Let me emphasize that again: in their current state, they cannot lay eggs naturally - to prevent the eggs from puncturing themselves, you have to give the mother a C-section and pull the strings of egg sacs out like a bunch of handkerchiefs tied together. This is not a state any living thing should exist in.

But how did it get this bad, you ask? Blame clown-showing authorities like the American Kook Club. The breed standards they set defining “ideal” clowns have gradually called for more and more pronounced features. When individuals win big events like Jokesminster, every breeder of that breed wants to to have the winner sire a litter with one of their clowns. When everyone is focused on a single, homogeneous ideal, inbreeding runs rampant and the breed’s gene pool shrinks dramatically.

So what do we do now? Unfortunately, there isn’t an easy solution. Preserving high-risk breeds may require crossing over with related breeds (in the case of the Belgian Spurthigh, we’ve seen some success with Andalusian Fool mixes). Clown breeders must continue to put pressure on the AKC and other authorities to prioritize health when defining breed standards. The clown breeds we know and love are in danger, but I believe that if we work together, we can continue to have happy and healthy clowns for generations to come.

3

I will never, ever, ever get tired of ONE turning shonen expectations on their heads. I love the way the two panels on the left set everything up for a giant go-all-out battle of psychic powers between Shimazaki and Mob… 

…and then the next few panels have Reigen just walking straight up to Shimazaki and punching him right in the fucking face. 

And the only way he could do it, was because he doesn’t have any psychic powers at all. 

6

Camp Camp past AU where Jasper is still the best camper, David is still a lil grumpy sass, and Gwen’s a camper and doesn’t have crippling anxiety/regret yet


EDIT: fixed spelling error

2

Why do you assume you’re the smartest in the room?
Soon that attitude may be your doom.

——

I got hit with the sudden urge to sketch some dysfunctional lawyers whilst listening to the Hamilton soundtrack. I’ve missed them.

3

Usernames and anonymous words are still people with lives, a house, hobbies, passions, problems, dreams, all that behind the screen. Never forget that.


I’m always doubting about doing these types of posts, but I thought maybe I could speak up every once in a while lmao. I apologize if I don’t word my thoughts correctly. What I’m trying to say is, I know it’s sometimes hard not to snap at inconsiderate/angering questions and sentences coming from young people who probably didn’t think about looking for answers or connecting their brain together. I know some of us can find works or reactions from young people “cringy” or “overdone”. I know it’s infuriating to see kids reposting, tracing or recoloring art because they still don’t know how important it is to respect the artists: the thing is, I believe we all had these parts inside of us when we were younger, too. We had things we liked that we find insufferable now, we had a younger self we’d like to punch in the face. There are things we regret. But thinking back at it, although unfortunate events in my life had made my childhood a personally hard time to go through and I expressed myself through childish actions, I’m glad I did go through these steps. It made me grow into who I am today: a person who’s willing to keep growing. I’m thankful I went through many experiences that now put me in the position to guide young people who perhaps need that guidance, one way or another. Let’s be firm, but compassionate. Don’t sugarcoat kids either, you’re allowed and SHOULD speak up when you feel like you’re suffocating. But always take a step back, and try to think for both sides. These “cringy” kids maybe ARE future mature creating geniuses!
We are tomorrow’s inspirations, models, and constructors!

Let’s be nice and understanding to youth and distance ourselves from online problems so we can focus on making it better instead. :)