stoppages

Irish John grew up in gaeltacht district and curses @ u in gaeilge constantly but talks dirty to Sherlock in gaeilge because he’s the only english person John likes lol. Carries taytos instead of guns. Made it all the way to The Great Game, and after the pool scene immediately took Sherlock home and Gave Him The Business because, “JAYSUS WHY DID YE NA SAY ANYTHING, WE COULD HA BEEN UP TO IT THE WHOLE TIME YE MADMAN!”

Takes forever to say bye to on the phone, “byebye bye bye aye bye bye bye luv bye oh wait bye bye bye”

The majority of my followers speak English so here… This was made by “Pulso Estudiantil”

We like the term, Fiscal Control Board***** better. Because they are basically the USA’s way of saying: Yo, Puerto Rico, you are still a colony of the U.S. And you will always be. AND THEY GET PAID A COUPLE MILLION DOLLARS…. (Idk… If we took that money and paid the debt wouldn’t it be more reasonable?

And anyways a lot of that public debt is ILLEGAL. Hedge funds are behind the whole thing… And the government refuses to audit the debt.

The UPR has 11 campuses… A cut that big will eventually result in the closing of smaller campuses….

The governor said publicly that the students should either choose to cut the $450millions from the University or public Health. Basically making EVERYONE believe the students are the villains.

The police already said that they will decide HOW, WHEN AND WHERE the students strike… Isn’t that the oppressors’ way of saying: “WE OWN YOU, YOU DO WHAT WE WANT.?”

I am totally missing a lot of things, but this is a bit of a summary of what has been going on in my University. And what will be going on in the following weeks. Please, share this. Let everyone know what is happening. And do not be influence what you might hear from “official channels”

In-depth: the Lanchester & Sten

After the British Expeditionary Force’s retreat from Dunkirk in June 1940, Germany was expected to attempt a full-scale invasion of Britain. In order to accomplish this, they would need to eliminate the Royal Air Force, and as such, the RAF’s airfields were at serious risk. The RAF wanted a Schmeisser-type submachine gun issued to their personnel in the event of an attack from German paratroopers. The Navy had already ordered 2000 Smith & Wesson 9mm carbines and the Army, who by now had realized that they had vastly underestimated the military effectiveness of the submachine gun, began buying Thompsons from the United States.


The Biwarip machine carbine, an early precursor to the Sten made in 1938 and tested by the Small Arms Committee. Remarkably modern for its time.


The RAF initially examined captured MP-38s and ordered 10,000 British-made copies, but there were complications that resulted not only in the weapons being changed from copies of the MP-38 to the MP-28, but also the order being increased to 50,000 to satisfy the Navy as well, who had been forced to abandon the S&W carbines due to serious malfunctions. Sterling Armaments Co. was contracted to produce the initial prototypes of the MP-28 copy. The resultant weapon was finished, in the form of two pilot guns, in late 1940 and demonstrated on the 8th of November. The pilot guns were designed by George Lanchester and thus were named after him.


Lanchester Pilot Gun 3. For whatever reason, this model appears to have no rear sights. It was tested in November 1940.


Lanchester Pilot Gun 4. This is the model used for endurance trials and was essentially the finished product. Tested on the 28th of November 1940.


The Lanchester pilot guns were tested again on the 13th of November 1940 and were tested with a variety of 9x19mm catridges, including Winchester flat-nose, ICI, Bergmann, Beretta, and German military issue. The first pilot gun failed to discharge the Winchester and ICI ammunition, but the second did not run into any major issues and was considered on-par with the German MP-38.

On November 28th, further trials of the Lanchester pilot guns took place in the presence of both George Lanchester and Major Reginald V. Shepherd of the Design Department at RSAF Enfield. The Lanchester was now in its fourth pilot gun form and fired 5204 rounds with 26 stoppages. It passed all the mandatory tests but did not function when loaded with Beretta-made ammunition. Otherwise it was considered good to go and production rights were handed over to the Royal Navy for immediate manufacture as the Lanchester Mk.I. This weapon was issued to the Air Force and Navy until 1941, when it was simplified as the Mk.I*, which had no fire selector and fixed iron sights.


The Lanchester Mk.I. Known as the “British Schmeisser”. It was heavy, sturdy, and solidly built - typical of Naval manufacture.


The Lanchester Mk.I*. Fully-automatic only with fixed iron sights. Many Mk.I*s were simply modified Mk.Is, but were not marked as such.


The Lanchester was good but production costs were too high to equip the army. Something cheaper and quicker to manufacture was sought. In January 1941, an extremely simplified model was designed by George Lanchester and demonstrated at Enfield on the 10th of January 1941, and at Hythe on the 21st. The prototype was essentially a Lanchester stripped down to the bare minimum. It consisted of a simple tubular body made from steel and grips made from Tufnel. It was supposed to have a folding buttstock but for whatever reason this was never fitted. The only real change to the base design was the inclusion of a fire selector just in front of the trigger grouping. Otherwise it was internally the same as the Lanchester Mk.I.

A second simplified prototype was also conceived by George Lanchester and differed in that the cocking slot was now on the left side of the gun and had a much lighter bolt which was about an inch shorter than the original. The grips were redesigned to be more ergonomic, and a simple single-strut stock was fitted to the rear of the pistol grip.


The first simplified Lanchester prototype. Essentially the forerunner to the Sten. The cocking slot has a safety recess.


The second simplified Lanchester prototype. This version had left-hand cocking and a three-position fire selector.


Both simplified prototypes of the Lanchester were tested but rejected. But from this concept, the Sten was born. It was developed in early 1941 by Major Shepherd and Harold J. Turpin, who worked at the Design Department at Enfield. Thus the weapon was christened the STEN (Shepherd, Turpin, ENfield). The design was an incredibly simple blowback system based on the Lanchester with a fixed firing pin and simple cylindrical bolt. The first version of the Sten, the Mk.I, had wooden furniture, a conical flash hider, and a hinged fore grip, a feature not seen on any of the subsequent models. The Mk.I was cheaper than the Lanchester but still too expensive; it was simplified further as the Mk.I* in late 1941. The Mk.I* ditched the wooden embellishments, the flash hider and the fore grip feature. Throughout 1941, over 100,000 Mk.I and Mk.I* Stens were produced and issued to the army.


The Sten Mk.I. The original model of the Sten, with features such as a folding fore grip and a flash hider that were not seen in later models.


The Sten Mk.I*. The first of many steps to simplifying an already very basic gun. Although production was somewhat brief, thousands were made.


In mid-1941, the Mk.II Sten was designed. It was a bare-bones version of a gun which was already very basic. The main difference between the Mk.I and the Mk.II Stens was that the Mk.II had a new barrel that could not be interchanged with the original Mk.I barrel. The Mk.II barrel had only two grooves whereas the Mk.I had six. Externally, the Mk.II was incredibly minimalist. There were two main versions of the Mk.II produced: one with a wireframe stock and one with a single-strut stock. Neither were particularly pleasant to shoot, owing to the poor ergonomics. The upshot of all this was that the Mk.II Sten was incredibly cheap to produce en masse for the army and, as an added bonus, proved very easy for anti-Nazi partisans to copy in workshops.

The Mk.II Sten was tested at Pendine on from the 7th to the 25th of August 1941 and a glaring fault was discovered. The magazines were made from stamped sheet metal, which meant that the feed lips were prone to failure. If the magazine feed lips were misaligned even slightly with the magazine well, the gun would jam. The magazines were also highly susceptible to dirt and sand. All of this basically meant that the Mk.II Sten was highly unreliable if not handled with care, and even then it was probably inevitable that it would fail at some point during the heat of battle. But the army was faced with a choice between a mass of unreliable Mk.IIs, or a handful of Thompsons, Lanchesters and Mk.I Stens. They opted for the former.


The Sten Mk.II. The most successful version of the Sten, with several millions being manufactured during the war and used by various countries.


The Sten Mk.II with bayonet and single-strut stock.


Prototype T42 submachine gun, based on the Sten Mk.II. It had a single-column magazine and a redesigned trigger group.



Sten Mk.II with SMLE stock. This was made as an experimental model only and never issued.


Sten Mk.II with wireframe pistol grip, designed for paratroopers.


Copy of the Sten Mk.II made in a workshop by Danish partisans.


The Mk.II Sten was by far the most successful model of the Sten gun, with over 2,000,000 being produced throughout World War II. It was first issued to British and Canadian troops during the raid on Dieppe on the 19th of August 1942 and continued to be issued until 1945. It was also issued in considerable numbers to the Free French Forces, including the French Resistance.

In 1943, the toy manufacturer Line Brothers Ltd. were contracted to produce the Mk.III Sten, which was made from a single, riveted sheet metal tube that was welded at the top. The ejection also had an extra safety precaution that consisted of a simple finger guard. The barrel was fixed inside the tubular body, which could not be disassembled. In Canada, the Mk.III was manufactured by Long Branch Arsenal.


The Sten Mk.III. Manufactured by Line Bros. Yet another simplification to lower the cost of manufacture.


On the other hand, this prototype Mk.III with a wooden SMLE-style stock would have been substantially more expensive to manufacture.


An experimental Mk.III made at Enfield. The trigger grouping is level with the ejection and the cocking handle is on top.


The Mk.IV was the only one of the Sten “marks” not to be issued to the army. In fact, it never evolved past the prototype stage. It was designed in 1943 with paratroopers in mind, with a shorter barrel and folding stock. The first version of the Mk.IV had a conical flash hider and a very unusual pistol grip and trigger guard arrangement that was designed to facilitate for thick winter gloves. It was a mere 27 inches in length. After it was trialed at Pendine at rejected for improvements, a second version known as the Mk.IVB was developed which was designed to be fired with one hand. To achieve this, the balance of the weapon was changed by moving the trigger grouping forward to the middle of the gun. The trigger mechanism had to be completely redesigned to allow this. It was 24 inches in length but uncomfortable to fire. Besides its flaws, there was no immediate requirement for the Mk.IV model so it was never developed any further.


The Sten Mk.IV. Produced as a prototype only. It was designed for paratroopers and soldiers operating in cold weather conditions.


The Sten Mk.IVB. Designed to be fired one-handed. The shortest version of the Sten by far, it was more a machine pistol than a submachine gun.


The Sten Mk.IVS. A silenced prototype of which only one was ever made.


In 1944, the Mk.V Sten appeared. It was a much more presentable weapon and a far cry from the crude Mk.II  The Mk.V featured a wooden butt, pistol grip and fore grip. The fore grip was ditched in later models. The front sights were also redesigned and lifted from the No.4 SMLE service rifle. Internally, the bolt was improved with a cutaway that cleared the trigger disconnector when the bolt came over the sear. The resultant weapon was of excellent quality and made to a much higher standard than its precursors. Unfortunately, cheaply-made magazine were still being issued and consequently the Mk.V was still just as liable to failure as the earlier models, although this was not the fault of the gun itself.

The Mk.V Sten was issued extensively to paratroopers after D-Day and saw considerable use during Operation Market Garden in Arnhem, and issue of the Mk.V continued until the war in Europe ended in May 1945.


An early model Mk.V. This version had a fore grip which was not seen on later models. The stock could be detached for paratroopers.


The Sten Mk.V. The most polished version of the Sten manufactured during the war. It was much more reliable than the Mk.II and was issued in 1944.


Many variations of silenced Sten guns were also developed. British interest in silenced weapons began in 1940 when British Commandos demanded a quiet gun for eliminating lone sentries during covert raids. Initially they were issued silenced Thompsons made by RSAF Enfield, but these were too heavy and expensive to deploy in any numbers. When the Sten Mk.II appeared, Enfield developed a suppressed model called the Mk.IIS. It was designed by a Polish exile who was now serving with the Special Operations Executive, Lt. Kulikowski. The suppressor consisted of a series of metal cups wrapped around and in front of the barrel, with a rubber plug at the end. When the weapon was fired, the gases seeped out the sidewall of the barrel and their energy dissipated. The bullet traveled through the metal cups and penetrated the plug, which prevented the gases from escaping. These metal cups were encased in a perforated jacket which was surrounded by an additional jacket.


Prototype Mk.IIS. The silencer contained 24 baffles. With so much weight at the front end and so little in the stock, it would have been awkward to handle.


The Sten Mk.IIS. The most successful silenced weapon of World War II.


The Mk.IIS was issued to Commandos, the SOE, and other British special forces units, as well as resistance fighters across Europe. It was designed to be fired in single shots. Reportedly, the sound of the bolt was louder than the gunshot itself. The main drawback of the Mk.IIS was that it had an effective range of only 100 meters.


Sten Mk.II with an SOE-made silencer and basic wooden stock, issued to special agents in France.


The Sten Mk.VI. Basically the Mk.IIS principle applied to the Sten Mk.V. It replaced the Mk.IIS late in the war.


Late in the war, the Mk.V Sten was successfully silenced using a similar principle and this model was called the Mk.VI. It did not see as much use as the Mk.IIS but was probably, all factors considered, the best silenced weapon of the war. It was succeeded by the Sterling L34A1 silent submachine gun.

theladyscribe  asked:

s/g robots in disguise

And the-undoubted-queen asked for accidental love confession. So here’s some tragic hockeybot Geno. I interpreted these prompts kind of loosely, uhhh the heart wants what it wants?

(I think I’ll do maybe one more of these? Some of y’all sent me fantastic prompts that are too much for a little tumblr ficlet, so I won’t fill them now but maybe check back in six months.)

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Random Satsuten Thoughts

• Who wrote the graffiti on B6? Did Gray go and take pictures of where Zack used to hang out so that he could accurately recreate it?

• What would’ve happened if B4 ran out of space? Would they have dug the oldest corpses up and gotten rid of them?

• WHAT IS UNDER EDDIE’S MASK?!

• Why did Cathy treat her traps like they were a Gameshow? Was she just being a mocking bitch, or did she have some sort of Deep Web Red Room set up?

• Where the hell did Cathy and Eddie come from? What are their stories? How many people have each of them killed?

• Where the hell did Gray get hallucinogenic gas strong enough to cause DEADLY hallucinations?! Did he make it? Did Danny?

• What happens to Ray if the giant snake catches her? I mean, it’s just a hallucination….is it brain death? Heart Stoppage? WHAT IS IT?!

• How the hell is Danny so freakishly durable? I get that he took measures to save himself the first time, but holy shit…..

• What sodas was Zack drinking? Where’d they come from? Was he allowed to make snack runs? Did he pay for them? Where’d he get the money if he paid? Did Gray have an allowance system set up? Did Gray bring them on request? Was Gray the Best Adoptive Dad?

Prince Charming (Brendan Gallagher)

Anonymous said:

I love your imagine. Oh my god ❤️❤️😂😂 could you make an imagine with anyone from the Habs? And basically they get into a fight that night and they don’t come out of it very good and they have to go to the hospital but since it was at their rink you were watching the game and it just becomes all fluffy? (If that makes sense. ❤️❤️❤️)

Word count: 2035

Originally posted by so-hockey-eh


Fights are a normal part of the NHL. You, as a hockey fan, like the fights a little more than the average person. Fights give teams that spark that they need to tie the game up. Enforcers are a vital part of the team; they boost the morale when the game just isn’t going that well. You carry a level of respect for the men that are able to go out on the ice and take a few punches for the good of the team.

However, when one of those men just happens to be your boyfriend, you’re a little less enthusiastic.

Brendan throws one hell of a punch, and he knows how to defend himself, but you still can’t help but to cringe whenever the gloves go flying off, or chide him as you hold an ice pack to his newest bruise. You know that you’re being a tad overprotective, but it’s not like anyone enjoys watching their boyfriend get beat up as thousands of people cheer him on.

Tonight’s game has been a scrappy one, that’s easy to see by the penalty minutes racked up and the dirty shoves between teams whenever there’s a stoppage in play. There’s already been a couple of fights, so you’re not all that surprised when Brendan and another player start yelling at each other, smirks plastered across their faces. You say a small prayer to anyone listening that Brendan doesn’t do anything stupid as you watch intently. Suddenly, Brendan’s eyes steel and his jaw clenches as his opponent insults him. Brendan drops his gloves and gestures as his new best friend does the same.

You gasp as Brendan immediately grabs a hold of the other player’s jersey and starts punching him, the crowd jumping to their feet around you and pounding on the glass, urging him off. His opponent suddenly gets a grip on Brendan and starts whaling on him, blood flying onto the ice now. Brendan, from the glimpses you catch, already has a black eye, a couple of cuts on his face and a bloody nose. Suddenly, the other player hits him on the side of his head. Hard. Brendan immediately goes down as you jump up, frantically watching him.

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Shoved; Then Jumping

She wakes early — the sky outside his window is barely lighter than the humid, musky darkness inside — and her first semi-conscious thought is don’t move, don’t wake him.

She needs a minute to herself before she has to deal with whatever’s about to happen.

Images from last night flood her brain: him clutching her as he sat in his desk chair, weeping and lost, abruptly and painfully an orphan; her moving off her knees once his tears had stopped and him pulling her close in a different way that was at once shocking and completely expected; his mouth on hers, his hands everywhere, his erection pressing hot and hard against her — and her immediate response in kind, the feeling of being so blazingly alive, so raw and vital, of sudden, animal heat rising to match his; the frenzied unbuttoning, tearing, yanking-off of clothes; his teeth scraping at her nipples through the lace of her bra; his fingers sunk deep inside her before her underwear is all the way off.

Oh shit, she thinks, forehead resting against the bare skin of his back, inhaling his scent, her traitorous body anticipating more — when she’s reasonably certain he’ll never be able to look her in the eye again.

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ok but can we talk about their hushed voices in the alley scene???

bc they were deadass almost whispering to each other. like, that was their moment and nothing else mattered. it was just the two of them in that alley, literally, but also in the sense that there was no one else in the world that existed to them in that shared stoppage of time. everything revolved around them and it was just the two of them and their grand statements expressed through hushed murmurs and i honestly can’t sleep thinking about this. they are so in love y'all and i’m so honored to be alive at the same time as them to witness this form of love in its purest, most profound way possible

Hi~

While this is not at all fandom related, it is extremely important!

The en masse reblogs are from the National Shutdown/Stoppage that happened today May 1st 2017 on my island.

Puerto Rico is in the middle of a devastating economic crisis and our own government is trying to shut us down. The debt is immense and they want the people to pay for the missteps and bad administrative decisions of past governors and political individuals.

Our current governor doesn’t want the world to see what they’re doing to us and what they’re threatening to do to not only our possible future but the generations that come after.

The media silence is killing us, the indifference is killing us, this government had drafted and approved reforms that take us back to working conditions of slavery, that is trying to make us choose between health care or education, that is threatening to shut down programs and is trying to KILL the biggest university system of the island. They are draining us, they are pushing us away from our home because the only possibility progress is away from here. Please, please, please reblog and let the world know.

Tyler Seguin 1.0

Plot: You and Tyler Seguin have been friends since you were in middle school, but when he was signed with the Bruins, your friendship slipped away until you were playing phone tag trying to catch up. Things only worsened when your family decided that a change in scenery was needed, and shipped the lot of you off to sunny California, effectively causing you to lose contact with the Seguin family all together. Fast forward seven years.

Warnings: Mentions of alcohol and recreational drug use.

This is my first imagine so let me know what you think, if I should continue, if I should stop and never write again, etc. Gonna be a two-shot if I continue.

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Dumbass hurt his hand again. I saw it Saturday. He was favoring it and had his glove off during stoppage in play last ten minutes of the game. I think he blocked another shot. Whatever it was he isn’t skating this morning