stop the bullet

Being overly-familiar with a series is such a weird burden sometimes because like

you’ll see some theory being passed around that you instantly know is wrong. Like it’s surprising to see people supporting it because the flaws in its logic are so glaringly obvious. Until it hits you that, yeah it’s wrong, but only because you were able to immediately remember the 5 second conversation between two background characters 17 minutes through s2e13 that definitively disproves it. And no casual fan would have any reason to remember that off the top of their head and it’s you who’s the weird human encyclopedia with a shot-for-shot memory the entire damn series.

Like at that point you don’t even know anymore whether to argue your point or just…maybe go outside for a little bit.

Idea for a Superman origin movie

built around two solid points:
1) Lois Lane is the lead character; and
2) The audience dose not know who is playing Superman going into the movie.

So the movie centers around a young Lois, who’s desperately trying to get a job as a reporter at the Daily Planet, despite a hiring freeze as the printed journalism business struggles to keep up, and despite the fact she has no prior journalism experience (at least, not outside of an expensive degree that has yet to start paying for itself). Even though no one at the Planet will even return her calls, she barges in in the middle of a work day, trying to get an interview. She bounces off a lot of people (a number of them tall guys with dark hair and nice eyes who she barely notices) until she tracks down Perry White, who tells her, sarcastically, that he’ll hire her on the spot if she can bring him a properly sourced article revealing the story Metropolis’s new hero, who just yesterday stopped a runaway train with his bare hands. 

She gets to work. Her friends tell her she’s crazy. Her sister bails her out of jail at least once (maybe a montage of times). Her father, General Lane, threatens disownment and/or military arrest. This “menace” broke a muggers arm last week, and is wanted for vigilantism. If she really does find out the identity of this man (who’s been gaining notoriety with every feat) and brings it to a newspaper before the military, her father would have to take action. (This country is his family, after all.)

But the more Lois looks into this ‘super man’, the more she likes what she sees. It’s hard without credentials, but she’s been collecting eye-witness reports for months trying to find the pattern to track; the pattern that everyone’s been looking for. She has dozens of interviews with police, and store owners, and caught criminals, but it’s in the interviews of the regular folk that she finds the pattern:

This man is kind. 

Every headline is about a larger-than-life figure who catches falling statues, wins chases with cars, and stops bullets with his pecs. In the words of the innocent people of Metropolis though, is someone else. Someone who flies broken cars to the shop from the highway during rush hour. Someone who takes a sobbing child from the scene of a bike accident and drops off a smiling one with their parents. Someone who’s been spotted leaving flowers by the headstones of the ones who didn’t make it out of that train crash. Someone who sits in a secluded corner of the park and plays chess with the old woman who’s husband can no longer leave the house. Someone who literally pulled a dog out of a river and a cat from a tree. 

So, to find the Man of Steel, Lois searches for kindness - and she finds it everywhere. She finds all the coats freely shed for someone cold. She finds all the grocery carts paid for by the previous customer. She finds lonely veterans offered a seat at the family table in restaurants. She finds hate symbols painted over with cute cartoons and symbols of love. She finds dozens and dozens of volunteers who help clean up and serve food and rebuild after train crashes and car wrecks and robberies. 

She finds Superman.

And then she finds a man in the park.

He’s not doing much, just sitting on a bench with his head in his hands. The copy of the Daily Planet on the bench next to him speculates on the dangers of super humans, as it has every day for the last two weeks. Some have even suggested that the Man of Steel is an alien, though those theories have only barely broken into mainstream. Whatever this man is worrying over, whatever weight is on his shoulders, seems much heavier than a newspaper, though. Lois hasn’t worried herself with the same issue’s as her prospective employer, either. Thoughts still on the group of teens she’s just passed, each promising to beat up on some boy for their friend, are still fresh on her mind, and she takes the spot next to the stranger on the bench.

He’s not a stranger, though. Lois recognizes him. She doesn’t know his name, but she saw him that day at the Daily Planet months ago, and she’s seen him across the police tape at scenes she’s investigated. He wrote today’s front page article: “Man of Steel, or Menace of Steel?”

He’s politely flustered when she sits down, and she promptly tells him that everything about his article - she’s already read it, of course - is absurd. She doesn’t care who “made him write it”, the entire thing is just plain wrong. She finds herself repeating stories she’s read and re-read at all hours of the morning. Stories of regular people who’d told her how they’d been inspired by Superman. How they’d taken leaps of faith toward recovery and new lives thanks to Superman. Teenagers have chosen to live because of Superman. She quotes sources, and sources of people, including herself, who have said that the city of Metropolis - maybe even the world - was so much better because of Superman.

“Superman?” the reporter asks.

“It’s just something I’ve been calling him. He’s got that big S on his chest, right?”

The reporter laughs. He hasn’t smiled the whole time, only looked at her with wide eyes. His smile is… nice. His glasses are dumb though.

“Yeah,” she admits, “it’s a dumb name.”

“No,” he says. A weight has fallen off his shoulders while she was flipping through her notebooks. He sniffles a bit. Lois had just torn into his article with all the fury she could muster, is he crying about it? No, he’s smiling, still. “I really like it. Have you written all this down?”

Lois Lane writes it all down. Her new friend (who proofread the hell out of it because Lois is driven as hell but can’t spell) Clark Kent turned it in to his boss. The newest headline reads:

The Story of Superman -by Lois Lane


She’s getting paid more than Clark in under a year. He just seems to be so distracted all the time. Maybe she should look into that…
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171117 | 🎧 : Peek-A-Boo - Red Velvet
An incomplete spread that i kinda like (*´∇`*)

taken from my studygram

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Things I’m working on: sleeping early. balancing social life and productivity. not blowing my entire life savings on boba. knowing what I deserve. accepting that anxiety will never completely disappear. being aware. forgiving myself.

Now Playing:

Your Shirt- Chelsea Cutler

Daddy Issues- Demi Lovato

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17/09/2017

eh, this week’s spread was pretty simple- school’s got me going crazy, and it’s only been a week :(( but it’s growing on me (the spread and school) (and i guess it’s kinda nice having some routine back into my life- summer was honestly just a big mess of high expectations and doing nothing)

i worked really hard on the pics- i tried mixing up the lighting and the bg and tbh i was just praying the entire time that no one walked in to me dancing around with a lamp in one hand and trying to focus AND take the shot with a camera in the other, all whilst trying to take a picture of a notebook

🎵 serendipity- bts (THE COMEBACK IS TOMORROALKJDAKS)

i brought a knife to a gunfight, which was really unfair to the guy with the gun

Remember when Andrew and Kevin were drinking while Neil was standing at the edge of the balcony, watching his friends dancing and having a good time, knowing he could never be a part of that? Well:

  • The whole team goes on another trip to Columbia to celebrate their victory
  • Neil’s debating whether or not to go dancing, but of course he isn’t going to say anything and he likes staying with Andrew too
  • And Neil knows there is no point in asking Andrew to dance because even if he agreed to, Andrew would not be comfortable on a packed dance floor
  • And Neil wants Andrew comfortable a lot more than he wants to dance with him
  • When the upperclassmen and Aaron and Nicky are heading off to go dancing, Renee asks Neil if he wants to come along
  • Neil hesitates for just long enough to reveal he’s considering it
  • Aaron takes off without waiting to see Neil’s verdict while Nicky starts up the “Come on, Neil. You never dance with us. Just once can’t you follow someone other than Andrew and Kevin’s lead and actually try to be fun?”
  • And Allison’s already trying to drag him out of his chair while Dan tries to talk him into it and Matt chants his name in encouragement

Keep reading

It’s hard to decide what my favorite Steve Trevor moment is between “She’s taking all the fire, let’s go!” And “Diana, shield!”. I mean both show how awesome he is as a character. One shows how quickly he adapts to Diana’s incredible abilities. He goes from “oh no she’s gonna die if she charges out into the battle” to “oh, she can stop bullets? Ok cool, let’s go then.” And the other shows that even in the midst of the chaos when the Germans were attacking the Amazons and he barely had any idea what was happening, he paid enough attention to the fighting style Diana grew up with to emulate it in a way he knew she’d understand.

I just love Steve Trevor, ok?

Over Planning = Procrastination

I am making this post based on a request by an anonymous user, but as soon as I heard the idea it really resonated with me. When you are a perfectionist, like I am, procrastination comes very easily. As soon as I have a single doubt about what I am doing, I stop and turn to something else, which leads to a lot of unfinished assignments and unnecessary stress. So in this post, I’m going to give you my best advice on how to avoid this very thing and get back to work! 

Methods of Planning

You  need to start by addressing how you are organizing you time and if it needs to change. 

  1. Daily study schedule: This is my least favourite, and in my opinion leads to the worst kind of overplanning. This is when you schedule out your time hour by hour, down to what time you will study, eat, workout, etc. I understand that this works for some people and if you find yourself to be very disorganized, it can work for you. However, I personally find (and I think many would agree) that it ends up giving me anxiety and guilt when I don’t do something exactly at the right time. 
  2. Weekly or monthly schedule: This is ideal for people who like to plan ahead a lot, but don’t want to be too constricted to an hourly schedule. This method involves writing down what you need to study each day, but not declaring a specific time that you need to have it done by. I really like to use this for exam periods or before a big test, so I know that all the topics are covered by a certain point. 
  3. Daily to-do list schedule: This works for a ton of people I know, including myself. It is low-key, but also allows you to know what you have to do and actually get it done. This is what most people use in a bullet journal, which is obviously a very successful technique! It blends together the planning of the daily schedule with the fluidity and low-stress of the monthly schedule. I highly recommend this if you tend to overplan! 

Overall: You might need to re-evaluate the way that you organize your time and find something that is more productive. My personal favourite is the daily to-do list, but if you need more structure in your life, feel free to look at others. 

Dividing Tasks

One big thing that leads to procrastination is not being able to focus on the most important tasks that need to get done. If you put too much stuff on your to-do list or into your hourly schedule, it might actually end up taking away from more important tasks. 

Learn to prioritize. List tasks in order of their importance when you are creating a to-do list or other type of schedule. You can use a numbering system, or colour code them if you need more help:

  1. Red = Extremely important: Things that are due in the next day or two, studying for upcoming tests, steps in a process that needs to get done by the end of the week, bills that need to be paid, chores that have to get done before your home becomes a wreck. 
  2. Yellow = Pretty important: Things that are important to your schedule, but it wouldn’t be tragic if they got pushed off one more day. Re-writing or typing notes, writing out flashcards for a test a week away, working on an application or deadline that is still a while away, chores that aren’t going to affect you if they aren’t finished tonight. 
  3. Green = Filler stuff: Things that would be nice to get done, but aren’t urgent. Cleaning, organizing your desk, finishing a book or movie for pleasure, etc. 

Avoid Procrastination

After you have organized yourself and prioritized tasks, you need to be able to focus on actually getting them done. 

  1. Set firm deadlines. A lot of times, this is easy because teachers or bosses set them for you. But if they don’t, learn to set your own deadlines and stick to them. Write them in your calendar and make note of them in the days leading up to it. 
  2. Make mini to-do lists for an assignment. If you have trouble following deadlines, or value to-do lists as much as me, breaking down assignments and large tasks into small pieces can be super beneficial. For example, if you have an essay due, create a checklist with the intro, body paragraphs, conclusion, editing, typing, and final draft all as separate tasks. 
  3. Find ideal study setting. A lot of people have trouble focusing on tasks when they get distracted easily. I find it really helpful if I’m in an environment that gets me in a studying mood! Going to the library or a quiet coffee shop really motivates me. Finding somewhere with few distractions, limitations on how much noise you can make, and being able to see other people being productive is the ideal way to focus yourself. 
  4. Avoid social media and TV. This goes hand in hand with #3… Being in front of the TV or the computer (when you aren’t actually using it) is super distracting! Go somewhere that doesn’t have these distractions. 
  5. Start with small tasks. Sometimes, tackling your to-do list is easier if you start by completing a few small tasks. When I’m not in the mood to study, I try to do some household chores and update my bullet journal to get the ball rolling.  
  6. Use the Pomodoro technique, or something similar. Use a Pomodoro timer or another type of scheduling to stay focused when studying and take breaks when needed. If you find that breaking it down minute by minute is too stressful, try setting goals like “as soon as I am done studying this chapter, I will get up and make a snack,” and stick to them!