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The teams behind SpongeBob SquarePants and stop-motion studio, Screen Novelties, stopped by to show an in depth behind the scenes look at the making of the @spongebob Halloween Special: The Legend of Boo-kini Bottom! 

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It’s funny how, out of all the types of animation, stop-motion is the one most commonly and consistently associated with horror. I wonder why that is?

Regardless, this is another stop-motion piece of horror animation that is goddamn amazing, especially in the monster department, and which I think @bogleech and @tyrantisterror would especially dig…

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Official Trailer of Wes Anderson’s “ISLE OF DOGS” new animated feature film.

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Dropped off the radar for a bit, but I did make this eldritch insult to nature. Hit the play button if you love to watch wretched bastard creatures suffering!

This is is a stop motion I made with a needle felted shrew monster the size of a German Shepherd , as well as some plastic bugs, funyuns, and a payday bar. The worst candy bar.

Interesting Tidbits from the Director’s Commentary for “Kubo and the Two Strings”

1. Kubo’s eye is indeed missing. It’s gone.

2. The monkey netsuke is a family heirloom.

3. Sariatu is holding her power in reserve for the day she’ll have to protect Kubo. That’s why her health and mental state are continuously deteriorating. 

4. Kameyo is Kubo’s one friend in town. His one friend. 

5. Kubo’s hair is actual human hair combined with silicone.

6. Puppets sweat. The silicone’s oils seep out of the surface under the heat of the lights. They have to be patted down occasionally.

7. Kubo was born in the Beetle Clan Castle.

8. When the Moon King attacked Hanzo’s fortress, he was aided not only by the Sisters, but also by his own army.

9. The Moon Beast’s design is supposed to be evocative of the constellations in the sky.

10. Confirmed: The villagers do indeed love Kubo.

11. The little images that appear in the margins of the end credits are meant to make it feel as if Kubo’s story is an old myth.

12. “Kubo is meant to be something of an Orpheus figure – a boy gifted with divine music who could coax rocks and trees to dance with the beauty of his work.”