stoneworking

10

Hirotoshi Ito

THE PLEASURES OF PARADOX

“A smile on the beholder’s face is the main motivation for my work.“

Hirotoshi Ito comes from a family of stone masons who for the last 130 years have been in the business of working stone primarily for monuments and grave markers.  Though stone is his primary media, he often combines different materials, incorporating metal, ceramics, and pigments in his works.  He makes his sculptural works while at the same time attending the family business.
For his personal work he collects stones and rocks from the riverbanks in his neighborhood, then utilizing the stone’s natural shapes and qualities he fashions them so as to express a warmth and humor in the hard stone.

www.jiyuseki.com/english/english.html

youtube

Stone age tools : prehistoric stoneworking techniques (1947), Wellcome Film

A demonstration by M. Leon Coutier, archaeologist and former President of the Societe Prehistorique Francaise, of his technique for making replicas of Palaeolithic tools and weapons, including hand-axes, scrapers, gravers and flint arrowheads. Filmed at the former Institute of Archaeology, Regent’s Park, London in June 1947. An important archeological record.

Part 1 of 2!

youtube

Stone age tools : prehistoric stoneworking techniques (1947), Wellcome Film

A demonstration by M. Leon Coutier, archaeologist and former President of the Societe Prehistorique Francaise, of his technique for making replicas of Palaeolithic tools and weapons, including hand-axes, scrapers, gravers and flint arrowheads. Filmed at the former Institute of Archaeology, Regent’s Park, London in June 1947. An important archeological record.

Part 2 of 2!

10

Marie Orensanz

works from 1970 through 1979

drawings on marble

Marie Orensanz was born in Argentina, and active in the art scene in Buenos Aires in the 60s and 70s.  In 1972 she moved to Milan and the proximity to the marble quarries in Carrara sparked an interest in the material.  She began to use the fragments of this symbolic material on which to create line, symbols, and words to evoke thoughts in the viewer which depend upon their own experiences. 

www.marieorensanz.com

Hirotoshi Ito

THE PLEASURES OF PARADOX

“A smile on the beholder’s face is the main motivation for my work.“

Hirotoshi Ito comes from a family of stone masons who for the last 130 years have been in the business of working stone primarily for monuments and grave markers.  Though stone is his primary media, he often combines different materials, incorporating metal, ceramics, and pigments in his works.  He makes his sculptural works while at the same time attending the family business.
For his personal work he collects stones and rocks from the riverbanks in his neighborhood, then utilizing the stone’s natural shapes and qualities he fashions them so as to express a warmth and humor in the hard stone.

http://www.jiyuseki.com/english/english.html

7

stone objects

       top: Ambum stone, Papua New Guinea, c.1500 BCE

      2nd:stone fish, Ming Dynasty, China

      3rd: composite seated female figure, Bactria (Afghanistan)

      4th: idol, chlorite & steatite ,  Bactria-Margiana c. 2200-1700 BCE

      5th: ball, Towie, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, c. 3200-2500 BCE

      6th: The Hindsgavl Dagger, flint, Late Neolithic, c. 1800 BCE

bottom: Sumerian eye, lapis, limestone, black-stone, c. 2500 BCE

 

 

Signs And Symbols-Celtic Knotwork

Continuing The Reading…

Celtic Knotwork
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One of the most distinctive decorative features of Celtic artwork and architecture are the beautiful constructions of Celtic knotwork. It adorns stonework, illuminated manuscripts, jewelry, the knotwork has left a distinctive trail that clearly shows all the places in the world that were visited at some point by the Celts.

The knotwork itself would appear to be a purely decorative device. If at one time there were specific symbolic meanings attached, then these have been lost over the centuries. Intertwining shapes and lines, however, generally point towards ideas of connectedness and the harmonious convergence of opposites, male and female, fire and water, Heaven and Earth, for example. In addition, any sign that can be made without the pen leaving the paper tends to have strong protective associations, and knotwork, with its continual looping and spiraling, could have been used in this way, perhaps used for amulets and talismans.

Existing symbols - such as a heart, or birds and animals - are often rendered in Celtic knotwork, In this case, the form of the underlying shape carries the symbolic meaning. The Celtic Knot that is square in form is a protective symbol, called a shield knot.

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SOURCE: “The Illustrated Signs & Symbols Sourcebook- An A to Z compendium of over 1000 designs” By Adele Nozedar
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Below are a few examples: