stonewall was a riot

a reminder for cis-varones

happy pride! go out and fag the hell out! be queer as fuck! disrupt the narrative that we must hide and be ashamed of our of existence! be loud and be proud! 

bbbbuuuuttttttttt, here are a few reminders for today:

the stonewall riots were the single most important event that inspired the LGBTQ community to rise up against police violence and homophobia. if there were no stonewall riots, which were led by queer and trans people of color including most notably marsha p. johnson and sylvia rivera, THERE WOULD NO PRIDE PARADES. 

stonewall was a riot! remember this whenever you witness protests by black and brown trans and queers folks. remember this before you curb your mouth to say “this is pride, this is not the place for protests!” 

pride is a celebration that exists because of protesting and rioting. here are three things that “protesting” has provided us cis-queer and gay men.

1. because of the stonewall protest, WHICH WAS A POLICE RIOT and led by black and brown trans women, we can dance and drink in a club without worrying about a police raid.

2. because queers yelled, screamed and protested the closing of bathhouses, we can suck dick at the baths.

3. many of us are ALIVE because queers challenged THE MUTHA FUCKIN’ GOVERNMENT AND PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANIES for basic HIV treatment!

so the next time we are twerking our asses off in the club, remember that protests provided us this privilege.

the next time any of us are sucking dick at the bathhouse, remember that protests provided us that privilege.

the next time we and/or our friends, family, or partner are taking LIFE-SAVING HIV MEDS, remember that protests provided ALL OF US this privilege.

so before any of us go damning, judging and condemning those who protest against systematic oppression, we need to come out of our ivory towers and into the streets in honor of; trans women, fags, queers, dykes, gays, drag queens, freaks and everyone who protested so that so you could shake our asses at pride. MANY OF THEM WHO PUT THEIR BODIES ON THE LINE DIDN’T EVEN LIVE LONG ENOUGH TO ENJOY THE PRIVILEGES WE TAKE FOR GRANTED.

i don’t want to be a teacher to feed ideas without explanations into the heads of our young generation. if you, as a teacher, only explain that things happened, and not why they happened, you’re not a good teacher. why would you explain that the stonewall riots happened, and give a test on it, instead of explaining that they happened, why they happened and why it’s significant. i want to be a teacher to teach kids to question why they believe what they believe.

if you’re a teacher to just tell kids what to think instead teaching them how to think, you’re not teaching, you’re indoctrinating

Black LBGTQ History Icons

Marsha P. Johnson

  • A leader of the Stonewall Riots. According to several eyewitnesses, Marsha was the one who “really started it”. She was “in the middle of the whole thing, screaming and yelling and throwing rocks and almost like Molly Pitcher in the Revolution or something”
  • Dedicated her life to activism:
    • Co-founded the Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (later renamed Street Transgender Action Revolutionaries)
    • Ensured that the young drag queens, trans women and other street kids on Christopher Street were fed and clothed. Marsha also housed them whenever she could. 
    • In the 1980s, she was an activist and organizer in ACT UP. 

Stormé DeLarverie

  • Also a leader in the Stonewall Riots - has been identified as the “butch lesbian that threw the first punch” against the police officers.
  • Several eye-witnesses recollections also recognize her as the cross-dressing lesbian that yelled “why don’t you guys do something” at the bystanders that evoked the reaction from them that helped make Stonewall a defining moment in history.
  • Unofficially worked at gay bars who otherwise couldn’t afford security.

Bayard Rustin

  • Was a leading strategist of the U.S. Civil Rights Movement between 1955-1968:
    • The formidable behind the scenes figure of the civil rights movement who organized the March on Washington
    • Through his influence, the civil rights leadership adopted a non-violent stance.
    • Is and was often overlooked in African-American history because of the public’s discomfort with his sexual orientation.
  • Supported LGBTQ rights and movements.
  • Was posthumously awarded Rustin the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Barack Obama.

Miss Major Griffin-Gracy

  • Another leader in the Stonewall Riots.
  • Has been involved in community efforts since 1978. She has worked at local food banks, provide services for trans women suffering from addiction or homelessness. During the AIDS epidemic she also provided healthcare and funeral services.
  • Is currently serving as the Executive Director for the Transgender GenderVariant Intersex Justice Project, working to assist transgender persons who are disproportionately incarcerated under a prison-industrial complex.

Alvin Ailey

  • At the young age of 22, Alvin AIley became Artistic Directer for the Horton Dance Company where he choreographed as well as directed scenes and costume designs.
  • Formed the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre in 1958 but continued to choreograph for other companies.
  • Ailey’s signature works prominently reflects his Black pride.
  • Is credited for popularizing modern dance. 
  • Was also posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Barack Obama.

Feel free to add anyone I’ve missed!

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Queer History.

The other morning I got into a ‘debate’ over the film Stonewall and one person said he didn’t care about the history of the Stonewall Riots or our queer history in general. Honestly, I couldn’t believe what I was seeing. This person didn’t seem to care that the only reason he (we) has any rights or can even happily come out without the fear of being arrested is because of events like the Stonewall Riots and the people that fought. Yet he enjoys the benefits of it (work equality, marriage, anti-discrimination laws, oh and being able to go to a gay bar and drink/dance the night away). So I wanted to put together a small overview of the riots in the hopes it enlightens anyone or gives someone the nudge to learn more. (If anything is incorrect just leave me a comment, I’m by no means an expert in this). Enjoy. 🏳️‍🌈✌️👭👬

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Before she died I said to her “Sylvia (Rivera), it just drives me crazy when people say to me ‘now was Stonewall a gay rebellion or was it a transgender rebellion’”. And I told her “I just tell them yes”. “Sylvia, what do you say? What would you say if somebody says 'did you fight back that night because you were gay, because you were a self-identified drag queen, because of police brutality, because you were a sex-worker, you had to turn tricks in order to survive, because you were homeless, because you knew what it meant to go to jail, because you didn’t have a draft card when the demanded to you that night?” And I’ll never forget her answer it was so succinctly eloquent, she said: “we were fighting for our lives”. And the fact is that oppressions overlap in people’s life, as they do in this room. There are people in this room who are carrying heavier burdens of discrimination and oppression. There are people who had more dreams that have been deferred. There are people who have less opportunities, more doors slammed in their face. And that was true at the Stonewall too … But the fact is that when they all came together, shoulder to shoulder, to fight back against a common oppressor that night, they made history. Not in spite of their differences, but because they came to understand the need to fight together against a common enemy. And that was the most important lesson of the Stonewall rebellion for so many of us, that was the power of what we could do when we all came together.
—  Leslie Feinberg www.youtube.com/watch?v=yaRF0Ohb1mg
Today is International Women’s Day.

Today also marks the show of solidarity for women’s rights by way of a strike: A Day Without A Woman. Women around the world are refusing to take part in both paid and unpaid labor in the name of justice for all gender-oppressed people of all ethnicities, religions, and sexualities. In doing so, they join the ranks of women who have led protests, strikes, and movements throughout history.

Let’s celebrate a few of those women:

Dorothy Height (March 24, 1912—April 20, 2010)

Originally posted by womenthrive

Dorothy Height, former President of the National Council of Negro Women, was one of the organizers of the 1963 March on Washington. She stood near Martin Luther King Jr. during his “I Have a Dream” speech, but did not publicly speak that day. In fact, no woman publicly spoke. “Even on the morning of the march there had been appeals to include a woman speaker,” wrote Height in her memoir. “They were happy to include women in the human family, but there was no question as to who headed the household!“ In 1971, she helped found the National Women’s Political Caucus with other notable feminists like Gloria Steinem, Betty Friedan, and Shirley Chisholm.

Marsha P. Johnson (August 24, 1945—July 6, 1992)

Originally posted by dannisue

Marsha P. Johnson spent her entire adult life fighting for the rights of LGBTQ people. She’s credited for being one of the first to fight back in the Stonewall Riots. She started the Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries with her friend Sylvia Rivera. Together they provided food, shelter, and care to young drag queens, trans women, and homeless children in need in the Lower East Side of NYC. She fought for what was right, and knew how to live life with exuberance and humor. When asked by a judge what what the “P” stood for, she replied “Pay It No Mind.”

Alice Paul (January 11, 1885—July 9, 1977)

Originally posted by taryndraws

Alice Paul was one of the leading forces behind the Nineteenth Amendment, which affirmed and enshrined a woman’s right to vote. She rallied 8,000 people to march in the 1913 Woman Suffrage Procession in Washington—no small task in a world before the internet—with an estimated half million people watching the historic moment from the sidelines.

And some good activist blogs to follow:

  • Emily’s List (@emilys-list) slogan is “ignite change.” They aim to do so by backing pro-choice candidates for US office in key races across the country.
  • Women of Color in Solidarity (@wocinsolidarity) focuses on being a hub for the the WOC experience in the US. Original posts, incredibly informative reblogs…this place is wonderful.

Happy Pride, everyone!

The month of June is often considered LGBT+ Pride month to commemorate the Stonewall riots which occurred in June 1969. Because of this, many LGBT+ Pride events are held around the world during June to celebrate love, diversity, and acceptance.

Have fun, stay safe, and celebrate love this month!

Reminder that a bi woman was the ‘Mother of Pride’

Brenda Howard was known as the “Mother of Pride” and is largely the reason why we celebrate Pride in the month of June. She coordinated a rally and march to commemorate the first anniversary of the Stonewall riots and also came up with the idea of planning events the week of Pride Day which later expanded to the full month of June. 

Bi women are not just welcome at Pride, a bi woman created Pride. So I hope all bi women and girls know that you are always, always an integral part of the community, the movement, and the celebration. I hope you have an amazing time this Pride month, those of you who decide to participate. 

You’re so important and I’m so proud to be in the same community with all of you. <3 

feelbending  asked:

Thomas I hope you're okay with all the current drama, I personally believe that you did nothing wrong at all. You're always making sure you're inclusive and doing the right thing, sorry your fandom's exploded :(

Hey!! Yeah, I’m doing fine!! Please don’t worry, these sorts of things happen sometimes and it gets very hard to address and handle all at once! I have made mistakes though, so please don’t feel like you have to defend all that I do, that’s not your responsibility, and I’ve been doing what I can to make sure things were addressed!

There was a piece of art of myself that was posted a while back that I put under a Read More and tagged nsfw because it was, and it was revealed later, after the artists’ bio was updated, that they were not of appropriate age, and that was a complete mistake on my part to make sure! I’ve always made a point to clarify, if people asked me, that if they were to do any nsfw art of me and submit it, that they should be of appropriate age to be doing so. My tumblr started as a personal blog and I thought tagging things appropriately would be enough, but this occurrence absolutely made me rethink how my blog was laid out and how much more consideration I needed to be putting into my blog and who was viewing it, so I made a public apology for it yesterday (in the #TSask) and decided to restructure my blog in order to make sure this never happens again. Posts I deemed too questionable, I have removed and if they ever go up again, they would be going up on a sideblog of some kind. I absolutely appreciate those who brought this up to me. I should have been the one to catch it, and I need to be far more vigilant about what I post from here on out!

There was also the post I responded to about why I felt it right to include asexuals and aromantics of any combination in the community. I’ve been having many really awesome and respectful conversations with people on both sides of this argument and its been really good, for me and I think for a lot of them, to gain understanding on where we’re both coming from. I am so grateful to those who came to me and got to discuss with me incredibly important things to remember and respect: the early struggles of the trans and gay community, the Stonewall Riots, the travesties and systemic oppression that still happen around the world today that need to be fought. We also got to discuss issues like arranged marriages that affect people on all areas of the spectrum. We talked about different demographics of the community and where they would like to stand or not stand. And the importance of limited resources made available to people of the community were discussed with me as well. I’ve been so absolutely grateful to those of you who came to me and are still coming to me to talk through these things, because I don’t claim to know everything, and many of the discussions were ended wonderfully respectfully. In the end, obviously, I have no, or maybe just really little, say in what defines the community. In what I say, I am absolutely making no attempt to prioritize people over another, because there are some extreme things that need to be fought. I can only be in control of myself and who I deem to be valid and who I would like to offer my support. I truly am trying to put myself in everyone’s shoes and see where they’re coming from. And I am so grateful so many of you came to me so respectfully to talk! That’s amazing! That, I think, is the most optimal form of discussion for people on both sides. I don’t like seeing anyone on either side attacking each other, and it’s so devastating to see so much of it. 

I truly hope this helps bring clarity for those of you who were confused or looking for an update! The internet can be a confusing place and the truth can be mangled, but I am doing everything I can to make sure I amend for any bad decisions and hear you all out as best as I can. I’m only human, and I truly do care about you and where you’re all coming from, so I hope you can all bear with me! 

My dear lgbt+ kids, 

Happy Pride Month! <3 

Here are some cool facts about Pride Month!

- June was chosen as Pride Month to commemorate the stonewall riots (which happened in June 1969).

- The stonewall riots were demonstrations by lgbt+ people against a police raid at the Stonewall Inn. They led the way to the modern lgbt+ movement/fight for lgbt+ rights.  (Here’s the Wikipedia article

- Brenda Howard, a bisexual and polyamorous activist, is known as the “Mother of Pride” for her role in coordinating the first lgbt+ Pride March. 

- The first president who officially declared June Pride Month was Bill Clinton (Gay and Lesbian Pride Month, 2000). 

- Barack Obama declared June LGBT Pride Month each year from 2009 to 2016. 

- The world’s biggest Pride event (by attendance) was a parade in São Paulo (Brazil) in 2006.  3000000 people attended. 

- There were lgbt+ events before “Pride” was a thing (before the stonewall riots happened). Some examples are the “Annual reminders” in the 1950s where lgbt+ activists carried signs with pro-lgbt+ slogans and information. 

- One of the slogans was “Gay is good” by Frank Kameny, a gay activist who, among other things, worked to get the classification of homosexuality as a mental illness removed. He was also the first openly gay candidate for the United States congress. 

- The first rainbow flags (a widely known symbol for Pride) were hand-dyed and stitched. Gilbert Baker (gay activist who came up with the idea) assigned a meaning to each color:

With all my love, 

Your Tumblr Mom 

(PS: Just a note to avoid confusion: As “lgbt+” is a relatively new term, other terms may be been used when the events took place and the mentioned people may have not used the term to describe themselves. I use “lgbt+” in this post to make it easier to read/understand, not as a statement which term is the “right” one to use).

Black Lesbians from the 1930s.

This ain’t nothing new!

I had an aunt who dressed like these ladies and she identified herself as a “stud” , a word used in the lesbian community to identify a level of masculinity. My aunt had to endure sexism, racism and scrutiny more than I can imagine. She was “out” during the 50s and 60s, waaaay before the famous LGBT Stonewall riots that took place in NYC.

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Pride parades are known for glitter, upbeat music and happy people dancing on bright floats, as they make their way through loud, colorful crowds.

This was not a pride parade.

“Stonewall began as a riot,” Sian Lewis, a member of the D.C. planning committee for the Equality March, said, as “YMCA” by the Village People blared from large, black speakers behind her.

“We are living the legacy of Stonewall,” she said.

Crowds stretched for blocks across the parade route near the National Mall, and while Lewis said they anticipated more than 200,000 marchers, she said the number of people who showed up blew their expectations.

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, straight, white, black, Latinx Americans and people from across the world all marched in solidarity Sunday to protest how they believe the Trump administration could negatively affect the LGBT community.

Participants were all ages. And they came from all over the world, on two feet or more.

The political march for equality comes one day after the Pride Parade in D.C., while marches and protests are ongoing around the country this June for Pride month.

And many participants feel as if this time in history is a turning point for the LGBT movement. They see it as an opportunity to note that while LGBT rights increased over the past decade, there’s still a long way to go.

D.C. Equality March Makes Pride Political

Photos: Liam James Doyle/NPR