stobbe

As Human

Plot: Reader got attacked by a Wendigo and is severly injured, everyone believes they are dead but once the rescue copter picks them up and they see how bad it really is.
Pairing: None.
Warning: mentions of death, DETAILED injuries, cursing
Reader Gender: neutral
Words: 1408

Can be seen as a Sequel to “Press Play” or as a separate piece. I hope this is alright with you!

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Comm 3070: Week 2 Blog Post 2

2. Choose one of the common issues in miscommunication of science and technology that Sarah discussed with you. Find an example of it in Stuttgart, Schwabisch Hall, or Tubingen. Explain clearly and in detail how it exemplifies this kind of miscommunication. Relate it to one of the readings (Stobbe, Nebel or Sun): How is your example similar to or different from one of the examples from a reading?


The issue of denialism was seen during our visit to AFRICOM. Caption Asuncion introduced us to Cori Fleser, a woman in charge of explaining the gray areas of gender to military personnel. While Cori was speaking, captain Asuncion, or munch as they called him, continually interrupted her. However, the most interesting part was that Cori was discussing the difficulties in speaking to military personnel and specifically men within that group while maintaining her authority and credibility with them. She said she had to learn how to maintain her aura of confidence in order for them to take her seriously. While she was saying all of this, munch would intervene to let us know that they weren’t sexist at all, and other comments about how not all military men look down on women. What is crazy to me is that in him interrupting her, to completely deny the fact that there are sexist military personnel made him one of the men she talked about. His interruptions actually furthered her point. His outright denial of being sexist and that the military treats women with less respect was a perfect example of his treating Cori, a woman, with less respect than she deserved.

In the reading by Stobbe the author addresses the issue of correlation and causation not being the same thing. He goes on to explain using popular examples, like more drownings happening because of the increase in ice cream sales, when in reality more ice cream is sold in the summer and more people go swimming in the summer. In this article, Stobbe mentions how we as a people can make quick assumptions that aren’t correct, and I saw this in our visit to AFRICOM. People assume because Cori is a woman that she isn’t correct in her information briefing. She mentioned that sometimes she can state information, and have the military personnel not listen however if a male counterpart states the same facts, the men start to listen.

Oversimplifications: Organic doesn’t mean healthy.

Prompt 2: Choose one of the common issues in miscommunication of science and technology that Sarah discussed with you. Find an example of it in Stuttgart, Schwäbisch Hall or Tübingen. Explain clearly and in detail how it exemplifies this kind of miscommunication. Relate it to one of the readings (Stobbe, Nebel or Sun): How is your example similar to or different from one of the examples from a reading?

At Schwäbisch Hall, one message was constantly incorporated into the media and briefings; this was the message that ORGANIC IS BETTER. In this post, I am going to explain why this statement is an oversimplification.

Over the past few years, the word organic has become a buzz word when talking about different foods and what is more healthy for you. The organic industry has built a high profile reputation for themselves as being always the most healthy option as well as being worth the higher costs, but often times this is not the case. It is important to remember that these are not reached by nutritional standards, but earth/animal/human friendly processes. 

Through advertising, organic brands have pushed the immediate connection between organic and healthy. However, just because something is organic, doesn’t mean that it is good for you. Organic Certification is solely based on the techniques of production and transportation of the goods. For example, I could be eating organic sausage and it could have the same amount or perhaps more fat and calories than the non-organic version.

Another aspect to consider are local farms that are still small carefully run farms, however, they may not have the money or resources to meet organic standards. Most of the times these products are fresher and have used fewer resources in order to get to your refrigerator or kitchen counter.

This oversimplification is similar to that in Nebel’s article about causes of autism. The oversimplification of both topics remains largely unnoticed because of the “overwhelming discordance between what the public knows and what the field knows” (Nebel). The public in the case of organic foods gravitates towards buzzwords like organic as well as other non-certified words such as natural or whole grain. However, we are buying these products without truly considering the dietary factors.

Also as a small end/side note, one could say that thinking that organic farming is the solution to all health and food problems is also a very utopic way of thinking. By ignoring the complexity of the situation, the whole point of organic farming gets lost in these advertisements and communications.

Miscommunication & Mercedes

Prompt 2: Choose one of the common issues in miscommunication of science and technology that Sarah discussed with you. Find an example of it in Stuttgart, Schwäbisch Hall or Tübingen. Explain clearly and in detail how it exemplifies this kind of miscommunication. Relate it to one of the readings (Stobbe, Nebel or Sun): How is your example similar to or different from one of the examples from a reading?


“The problem comes when we incorrectly assume that two characteristics connected to each other are ‘causally’ related.” (Stobbe, 2011, p. 1)


This quote from Stobbe’s article relates directly to the concept of correlation vs. causation that Sarah discussed with us in class. Simply put, people tend to jump to conclusions and assume that one thing causes another, without looking further into context or background information. I saw this happening in the Mercedes-Benz Museum, specifically in the timeline wall exhibits throughout the entire building. These wall displays contained information about Mercedes-Benz’s technological milestones alongside major historical events. This timeline-like structure of this wall exhibit leads viewers to almost see these technological advancements made by Mercedes as the cause of major historical events. For example, the exhibit included a piece on the target markets and products that Mercedes had to offer in the late 1890s, which was followed almost directly by a piece on the beginnings of mass tourism in 1900. The order of these pieces causes the viewer to think that Mercedes-Benz’s technological product advancements were responsible for the beginning of mass tourism. However, if you look at more information and context, Mercedes-Benz’s technological advancements were not the sole cause of mass tourism, despite these events happening at a similar time. This causation miscommunication occurs with multiple different major historical events, like the women’s movement, throughout the museum. This example is similar to the ice cream and drowning example found in the reading. Like the advancements made by Mercedes and the beginning of mass tourism, an increase in ice cream sales and in drowning occurred at the same time, however they did not cause one another. Researchers failed to realize the context, which was that these events are both more likely in summer months.

Comm 3070: Week 2 Blog 2

Choose one of the common issues in miscommunication of science and technology that Sarah discussed with you. Find an example of it in Stuttgart, Schwäbisch Hall or Tübingen. Explain clearly and in detail how it exemplifies this miscommunication. Relate it to one of the readings (Stobbe, Nebel, or Sun): How is your example similar to or different from one of the examples from the readings?

           In the Schwäbisch Hall area, the farmers are very vehement that organic farming practices make better quality food, and thus it is better for you. Some even take this to the extreme and follow the Demeter standard. Because organic farming is more labor intensive and a costlier agricultural practice, the pricing in supermarkets for organic goods is higher. According to Rudolf Bühler, this can be as much as $0.40 more. Because organic foods are more expensive then it’s inorganic counterpart, one can easily assume that those on a lower budget are less likely to buy the more expensive version. Therefore, it is reasonable to conclude that those with a higher disposable income are more likely to buy organic foods. Having a higher disposable income will not only effect one’s buying habit in the super market, but also other aspects of life such as healthcare. It can also be reasonable to assume that those with a larger budget can afford and have better healthcare then those straddling the poverty line. Using this process of reasoning, on can conclude that organic food is not a cause for better health, but merely a correlation with the third ignored variable being income level.

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(Different levels of organic certification achieved by  Schwäbisch Hall)

           Organic foods and better health is not the only time that the causation and correlation have blurred together, especially when being publicized by media. This is a common occurrence with many health related studies. As pointed out by Stobbe, “Media loves to grab your attention” and will use buzz words catch the public’s eye. Unfortunately, the implied meaning of these words often lead to one taking the outcome of the study to implicate a causation instead of a correlation. Income level is a common hidden third variable that is ignored when distinguishing whether the relationship between two factors is a causation or a correlation. A well-known study that drew the conclusion that HRT can aid in preventing coronary heart disease is used to as an example as an example to demonstrate this phenomenon. Like the organic food and health case, this study also failed to consider the effects of income level. Miscommunication is a common occurrence in all realms of media, and they can lead to the public drawing an inaccurate assumption.

Prompt 2: Choose one of the common issues in miscommunication of science and technology that Sarah discussed with you. Find an example of it in Stuttgart, Schwäbisch Hall or Tübingen. Explain clearly and in detail how it exemplifies this kind of miscommunication. Relate it to one of the readings (Stobbe, Nebel or Sun): How is your example similar to or different from one of the examples from a reading?

During our tour of Africom, we got to listen to a number of speakers talk about how the organization operates, some of the missions they are involved with, and how women are treated throughout the organization.  Our speaker, Corey, talked about some of the difficulties she has seen and experienced being a woman in a predominately male organization. She talked about how she has to give her briefs in a very direct manner because if she even has one joke incorporated in her brief then the men there would automatically write her off as not being as competent. This is a clear example of denialism, which is when there is evidence something has occurred but the person or organization is so stuck in their way of thinking that they refuse to accept the new conclusion. She talked about how she is working to educate other members of Africom on the issues of women in the armed forces but some of these members were not receptive to the information she was presenting. This goes against what Stobbe said in the reading about how “The problem comes when we incorrectly assume that two characteristics connected to each other are “causally” related. In other words, one of the characteristics is responsible at least in part for the other one.” Here there is clearly a correlation between women not being well respected purely because of the fact that they are women. This implies that one directly correlates to the other, which in this instance is what is going on. For example, Corey was the only one employed at Africom to educate on these issues, which implies that the organization does not take problems associated with women in the armed forces as seriously as other organizations. She also gave some examples of how women have been mistreated and when these issues were brought up to management of the company, they did little to fix the issue. The science they are refusing to accept is the knowledge Corey gives about issues associated with being a woman in the workforce. 

3070 Post 5

Prompt 2: Choose one of the common issues in miscommunication of science and technology that Sarah discussed with you. Find an example of it in Stuttgart, Schwäbisch Hall or Tübingen. Explain clearly and in detail how it exemplifies this kind of miscommunication. Relate it to one of the readings (Stobbe, Nebel or Sun): How is your example similar to or different from one of the examples from a reading?


An example of miscommunication occurred during out trip to Schwäbisch Hall within their standards of organic farming. Their Demeter standards are standards which surpass the ones set by governments. This world they create of high standards; organic farming represents a Utopia of a “perfect world”. A utopia is an unattainable world of ideal perfection.  The strict farming of only ground up, organic foods sets the stage for a Utopia that the association wishes to be. This utopia is free of pesticides, animal cruelty, chemicals and etc. However, this example actually relates a dystopia, for it is not so simple to make farming completely organic. By eliminating manufacturing, processing, and pesticides, we see a loss in jobs in these markets. It may be ideal to have healthy foods free of pesticides and processing for consumption; however, it does affect the lives of works in the field of these natures. Therefore, the utopian world of organic farming is unattainable because a balance is unattainable.
This relates to the article by Sun about Anti-Vaccine Activists because as we have developed vaccines, we hope to eliminate diseases to help save lives. It’s a common belief that we would not wish deathly illness upon anyone; we would prefer a world in which people are healthy and do not contract deadly illnesses; however, as with the organic farming, this utopia world of illness-free is unattainable without complication. We thought vaccines were our stepping stone towards a “perfect world” but they have brought about much more complications than we expected. The article mentions how the arguments over vaccine shave grown increasingly controversial because there have been suspicions of vaccines causing other issues. The article mentions a quote by Sahra Osman saying, “For God’s sake, I want to know if vaccines are safe"! This cry of hers is easy to resonate with as we all would like to know if the vaccinations are safe or if we are poisoning our bodies. A utopia created by vaccinations is not as attainable as we would hope for. This is similar to how we saw the organic farming as wanting to be a utopia but there are much more complications that come along with it, as so with vaccinations. Also, if we were to attain the utopia of low illness rates because of vaccinations, we would run into the eliminate of a higher population and all the problems that would arise from it. The problems of overpopulation could lead to worse living conditions as well which would diminish the level of health that was increased by vaccinations. Altogether, it makes sense why the term utopia is greek for “no place” because there truly is no perfect balance.  

Animals treated well: Here is one pictured in a pasture of much room to roam

Manuals avialble for the farmers in the media center

Demeter’s guide to making a biodynamic farm by their standards