stinkbugs

“Blue Shieldbug” (Zicrona caerulea)

…a species of stinkbug (Pentatomidae) which is widely distirbuted throughout Europe and Asia, it has also found its way into North America as well. Blue shieldbugs typically inhabit grasslands, forest edges, other areas with low vegetation. Unlike most stinkbug species Z. caerulea is a predator with both adults and nymphs feeding on  leaf beetles of the genus Altica. As well as other beetles and lepidopterans. 

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Hemiptera-Pentatomidae-Zicrona-Z. caerulea

Image: ©entomart

I'm in a happy place

except there are potential cockroaches.

Story:
I’m at Vassar visiting Thomas, one of the best people in the universe. I first take a nap in his bf’s room, and then we go to his room (which he hasn’t slept in much, sadly, so it doesn’t smell like him…. we have a thing about smelling each other. It’s weird, I know, okay?) and I notice all of his pictures are over his roommate’s bed, and all of James’ pictures are over Thomas’ bed.

I ask why.

Bad idea.

Apparently the first week of school James found a cockroach near his bed, so they switched. They have been finding stink bugs etc. in their bags and shit since.

So like, Yay for being all cuddly in Thomas’ bed, but like… boo about the bugs… 

pennlive.com
New stink bug with attitude is heading toward Pennsylvania

A new stink bug with attitude is heading toward Pennsylvania.

As if farmers and homeowners haven’t been bothered enough by the brown marmorated stink bug that landed in Pennsylvania in the late 1990s, a smaller but equally pesky bug is making its march toward the state’s border, experts say.

The Megacopta cribraria, known as the kudzu bug, has an armor-like shell and a beak for ripping into plants and feeding on legumes, particularly soybeans.

They can swarm but not feed on other plants such as grapes, wheat and corn, according to researchers at North Carolina State University’s College of Agriculture and Life Science.

The kudzu bug, which has been detected in large numbers in the South, secretes a distinctive odor and can bite humans, causing a minor skin irritation or even a small welt, researchers said.

“They’re in three counties in Kentucky … and will hitchhike in [to Pennsylvania],” said Wayne Allan Gardner, a professor of entomology at the University of Georgia. “They are right on your border.”

Like the marmorated stink bug, scientists believe the kudzu, which comes from Japan and the Korean peninsula, probably entered the United States near Atlanta in an international shipping container.

The oblong-shaped bugs, about a quarter-inch long with olive-green coloring and brown speckles, have been spotted as far north as Sussex County, Del., and four counties in Maryland.

John Tooker, a professor of entomology at Penn State University, has alerted Pennsylvania farmers to the threat.

“There are no reports (of kudzu bugs) in Pennsylvania yet,” he said. “But … everyone expects them to be here.”

The bugs, which are strong fliers, travel in large numbers and began tearing through Georgia four years ago, working their way to Florida, the Carolinas and into Maryland and Virginia.

The bug emits a distinctive odor.

A woman in Georgia called 911 because she smelled what she thought was a gas leak in her home, Gardner said. No leak was found, and rescue crews determined the smell was coming from a layer of kudzu bugs covering the screens in her windows and doors.

Researchers at the Department of Agriculture are trying to identify natural predators of the kudzu bugs to help reduce their numbers. Some scientists have isolated a gnat-sized wasp that they believe could be introduced into areas to combat the bugs.

Farmers in the South have had some success with insecticides, Gardner said. It’s been tougher going for homeowners.

“A lot of the insecticides for home use have a short window of activity,” he said. “You may kill the ones you have today, and tomorrow there will be hundreds more.”

Stinkbug eggs

Stinkbugs (Hemiptera - Pentatomidae) often lay their eggs in clumps. Individual eggs are glued not only to each other but also to the leaf on which they are left. The delicate projections may aid, like snorkels, in respiration.

Technique: Colored Scanning Electron Microscope image.

Photo credit: ©Martin Oeggerli

OKAY ASSHOLES HERE'S HOW YOU DEAL WITH STINKBUGS

YOU DON’T KILL THEM

NO NOT BECAUSE LIFE IS PRECIOUS

BECAUSE YOU’LL HAVE DEAD STINKBUG SMELL ALL UP IN YOUR DWELLING AREA

YOU GET SOME GODDAMN TISSUE

YOU WRAP THAT BITCH RIGHT AROUND THAT STINKBUG

YOU FIND A TELEPORTER TO THE OUTSIDE

YOU THROW THE TISSUE

YOU RUN THE FUCK AWAY

YOU GET THE TISSUE LATER BECAUSE GIVE A HOOT DON’T FRICKING POLLUTE