stillbirthed

“Blue Bell Ice Cream on Monday issued a voluntary recall for all of its products because of a possible health risk found in half gallon containers of Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough ice cream produced on March 17 and March 27.

Known to millions as “the little creamery in Brenham,” the Texas company explained its decision in a news release issued just before 9 p.m.

The recall includes products made at the company’s Brenham plant as well as its facility in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma. According to Blue Bell’s statement, its ice cream, frozen yogurt, sherbet and frozen snacks:

“…have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headaches, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

The company said it now has evidence of positive Listeria found in products at different places and different plants.

Blue Bell said supermarkets in Texas, Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, Wyoming and international locations have all been instructed to stop selling the products.

If you have any Blue Bell ice cream, do not consume it. Return it to the store where you bought it for a full refund.

Call Blue Bell at 866-608-3940 weekdays from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. or Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. if you have further questions.”

alternet.org
Terrifying Precedent: Woman to Be Tried for Murder for Giving Birth to Stillborn When She Was 16

Mississippi has one of the worst records for maternal and infant health in the U.S., as well as some of the highest rates of teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted disease, and among some of the most restrictive policies on abortion…

“It is tremendously, tremendously frightening, this case…There’s real fear for young women whose babies are dying early who [lack the resources to] defend themselves and their actions.”

Rennie Gibbs’ daughter was stillborn with the cord wrapped around her neck, but when autopsy results turned up traces of a cocaine byproduct in her baby’s blood, Gibbs was indicted for “depraved heart murder,” with a maximum sentence of life in prison.

It should come as no surprise that Gibbs is a young, low-income black woman, a member of a demographic disproportionately targeted by the legal system in cases like this and others, and more vulnerable to stillbirths.

A committee for the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists determined that “pregnant women who fear the legal system avoid or emotionally disengage from prenatal care - the very thing that might help assure they give birth to health babies. Drug enforcement policies that deter women from seeking prenatal care are contrary to the welfare of the mother and fetus.”

Until we stop pretending punishment and stigma is an effective deterrent, and work to address the underlying issues in maternal health, women will continue to be targeted for addiction, mental illness, and self-determination.

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Just a few of the tragic cases of human rights abuses documented in the investigative series, Women Incarcerated, by Sharona Coutts and Zoe Greenberg at RH Reality Check. In an overcrowded system designed for men, women suffer miscarriages, stillbirths, and ectopic pregnancies as guards look on or ignore them, or in some cases, shackle them as they labor. 

After a few sounds released by Ethan Kath, one half of Crystal Castles, it is time for the other half, Alice Glass to release a new sound. Making a statement against abusive relationships (we can imagine which relationship she is reffering to), the track will be out on July 18th and all the digital purchases “ will benefit organizations (like the nonprofit RAINN) that help survivors of domestic abuse, sexual violence and incest.”

You can check on Alice Glass statement here on her website

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Anti-abortion measures pose a risk to all pregnant women, including those who want to be pregnant.

Such laws are increasingly being used as the basis for arresting women who have no intention of ending a pregnancy and for preventing women from making their own decisions about how they will give birth.

How does this play out? Based on the belief that he had an obligation to give a fetus a chance for life, a judge in Washington, D.C., ordered a critically ill 27-year-old woman who was 26 weeks pregnant to undergo a cesarean section, which he understood might kill her. Neither the woman nor her baby survived.

In Iowa, a pregnant woman who fell down a flight of stairs was reported to the police after seeking help at a hospital. She was arrested for “attempted fetal homicide.”

In Utah, a woman gave birth to twins; one was stillborn. Health care providers believed that the stillbirth was the result of the woman’s decision to delay having a cesarean. She was arrested on charges of fetal homicide.

In Louisiana, a woman who went to the hospital for unexplained vaginal bleeding was locked up for over a year on charges of second-degree murder before medical records revealed she had suffered a miscarriage at 11 to 15 weeks of pregnancy.

Florida has had a number of such cases. In one, a woman was held prisoner at a hospital to prevent her from going home while she appeared to be experiencing a miscarriage. She was forced to undergo a cesarean. Neither the detention nor the surgery prevented the pregnancy loss, but they did keep this mother from caring for her two small children at home. While a state court later found the detention unlawful, the opinion suggested that if the hospital had taken her prisoner later in her pregnancy, its actions might have been permissible.

In another case, a woman who had been in labor at home was picked up by a sheriff, strapped down in the back of an ambulance, taken to a hospital, and forced to have a cesarean she did not want. When this mother later protested what had happened, a court concluded that the woman’s personal constitutional rights “clearly did not outweigh the interests of the State of Florida in preserving the life of the unborn child.”

Anti-abortion reasoning has also provided the justification for arresting pregnant women who experience depression and have attempted suicide. A 22-year-old in South Carolina who was eight months pregnant attempted suicide by jumping out a window. She survived despite suffering severe injuries. Because she lost the pregnancy, she was arrested and jailed for the crime of homicide by child abuse.

After suffering a stillbirth, Purvi Patel was sentenced to prison under Indiana’s feticide law. She is the first person to be first person to be charged, convicted, and sentenced for the crime of feticide in the United States. 

This is what the landscape looks like if pregnancy outcomes, including abortions, are the subject of criminal investigations in the United States.

SIGN THE PETITION and demand justice for Purvi Patel