still working out how to draw them

anonymous asked:

I love your art, and one thing I keep noticing you praising is values. Do you have tips or references on how to improve or how to use values for drawings? Thank you!

The most important thing in my opinion is not only values but edges- you can have a wide range of values and use them all appropriately, but if your edge control (mini tutorial here) isn’t so great then your viewer won’t necessarily find your work to be aesthetically pleasing.  

The basic idea of edge control is that you use hard edges to draw the viewer’s eye, and soft edges to direct them away from a certain area–having soft edges will make your hard edges more emphasized, which is why it’s useful to have a combination of the two.  To make soft edges, blend two values together as much as is needed.  To make hard edges, zoom in a bit (or get closer to your paper) and sort of ‘cut’ a boundary between two values.

If you’re doing your studies and still figuring out how to incorporate values into your pieces, I’d suggest a few things:

• One, physically back away from your picture every once in a while to see if it still reads.  For instance, if you find your subject blending into the background where you actually want them to stand out, consider sharpening the edges.

• Two, use a simpler brush (default/without a lot of texture) if you’re working digitally.  A lot of artists like to use brushes that mimic traditional media (dry brushes, pencil brushes, painterly stuff like that), but it can be oddly difficult to control values and edges with these brushes.  I think the reason is that a beginner artist focuses more on how pleasing the brushes look than on how solid the actual painting is.  

• Three, if you’re working in color, find a way to view your pic in black and white every once in a while.  It’s really easy to get caught up in color combinations and to forget about the underlying values.

“Lance,” he said encouragingly, “just try and feel the connection.”

“I am!” He hadn’t been, but it was easier not to admit that. Keith didn’t seem to believe him however.

“Just-” he scooted over in the chair and patted it with his free hand. “Just come and sit with me at least. Maybe she can sense that you and I are connected.”

Lance scoffed but did as he was asked, squeezing into the space beside Keith with relative ease considering it wasn’t very large. Part of his leg draped over Keith’s lap, and he averted his eyes to try and focus on something, anything, other than the feeling of the red paladin beneath him.

“I don’t think the lions know that we’re holding hands Keith,” he replied with a sigh, knowing that this was hopeless, and that they were probably going to be stuck in a strange plant goo storm and get stranded on this awful planet forever.

Because he couldn’t form a proper bond with the black lion and help save them.

Because he didn’t have what it took to pilot her.

Because-

Keith gave their hands a squeeze, and Lance’s mind went momentarily blank.

“Then maybe she can sense another connection,” he whispered. “A deeper one.”

Lance felt his cheeks flush anew, and let the grin show on his face as he stared at Keith.

“You and your bonds,” he chuckled, and Keith beamed. As if in reply, the inside of the black lion lit up suddenly, and from behind them Shiro cheered boredly.

I commissioned @sleepy-moans to draw something for my fic Stick with Me and it’s honestly the best decision I’ve made in a while. Go give them so love for creating such a wonderful piece of art!! It’s perfect!!

4

Moana Visual Development, Part 1.

Here are some of the very first drawings I did for Moana (Minus the last one, which was done later in the vis-dev stage). I was fortunate enough to work on the film in its very early stage thanks to the graciousness of Ron & Jon. Working with them alongside Jennifer Lee and Fawn Veerasunthorn is one of my fondest memories at Disney.

I have lots of Moana artwork that I want to post here, and am still trying to figure out exactly how to group them. Stay tuned! (For more work, you can also check out my instagram: @minkyu_lee_animating)

Moana is out in theaters now! 

Hi I’m iguanodont and I don’t know how to draw monsters
They eat sea garbage and smell like 10 million rotting fish
The oldest ones are completely infested with giant parasitic hagfish that are kinda just eating them alive
Nobody remembers if they’re manmade or natural but some of em still hang around the few remaining coastal cities and slurp up their pollution (and the occasional ship)
They don’t come out of the sea anymore but rumor has it they used to trash entire cities back when they were spry young kaiju

Daily reminder: you are loved

I was talking to Nina about ADD and I just realized how to describe it. So let me put it here.

Focus is something you hear from a young age, focus on this, focus on that, why don’t you remember these things. And you don’t think it’s abnormal, because people forget things, they’re people. And maybe you forget to tie your shoes and people make fun of you for it, but you don’t mind cus it’s a quirk, you’re just forgetful that’s all, and in children that is fine.

Then you enter school. Your teachers ask you to sit still in chairs, or to be quiet, or to stop drawing, or to pay attention or combos of them all. And it’s hard, it’s so hard to do those things and when you can’t manage it, you’re misbehaving. Maybe your grades start to drop because everything seems to slip by, the board in front of you might as well be covered in fog for how well you can focus on it. Or maybe you skate by because the work is easy, you might not be able to focus on the lessons entirely but you can force yourself to tune in for just enough to stitch it together. 

It doesn’t matter which one you are, or if you’re another. Eventually, at some point, you come to a conclusion. Because people won’t let you forget it, how easy it should be to remember to eat lunch, how easy it should be to study by reading over notes, how easy it should be, how easy-

Focusing is natural for everyone else. They don’t have to think about it like you do. They struggle sometimes, for sure, but often clicking in is just natural. Focus is a choice. 

Focus is not a choice for you. It’s an effort. It’s the hardest work you ever do when you’re not interested in something and someone wants you to watch a board and listen to them talk work for word. It’s like keeping eye contact for a straight hour without blinking. When you can keep focus, it tires you, takes everything you have, and you hate that it’s so easy for everyone else. And when you can’t, when you catch the first five minutes and a thought drifts your way and suddenly the lesson is over, you look at your empty page of notes and wonder why you keep fucking it up.

You start to feel stupid. Maybe your grades reflect it. Maybe they don’t. Either way it starts to stick, how everyone else can do this so easy and you can’t. Like you’re supposed to be able to do it. People get frustrated with you, why don’t you remember this conversation, why can’t you study, god if you only tried-

You want to scream you try. You try your heart out. But everyone seems to certain you don’t. The things that help you focus better, chipping nailpolish off, drawing, tapping your leg, are all signs you’re not giving it your all. They’re signs you’re lazy. You wonder if your trying isn’t enough. Maybe you’re supposed to give everything. You stop your drawing, your movements and your grades slip and it’s not supposed to be like this, you’re stupid, why are you so stupid-

Maybe one day, you realize you’re not stupid. It’s brain chemistry. Maybe they give you drugs that help and suddenly the world is a little clearer, and focusing is easy and was it supposed to be this easy, is that why no one got it? Because they never knew what it was like to cling off the edge of an icy ledge and have no purchase? Or maybe drugs don’t work and you find other ways to work, move lectures to hands on assignments, study by writing yourself practice exams and filling them out yourself, drawing problems to see them rather than to focus on an abstract. Maybe it helps some days. Maybe it doesn’t. But you know it’s not you and that’s what counts. 

You still feel stupid though, some days. When you forget your keys, or laugh too loud, or forget fragments of conversation. Because it’s supposed to be easy and you can’t quit that thought no matter how hard you try. Except-

Sometimes, with some things, things you really care about, focus isn’t a problem. Maybe it’s a tv show you like, maybe it’s a hobby you enjoy, maybe it’s a subject you can’t learn enough about. It’s something that matters, something that you love. There you can focus. You can do more than focus: you can tune out the rest of the world like it’s nothing. The world centers to you and the thing, and until you pull yourself out, it remains that way. In this world, you’re never stupid. You’re just you, and you can see everything in front of you crystal clear. 20/20.

You put the thing you love away. The real world awaits.  When you get up, you forget to bring your empty mug of tea with you.

And for a moment, just a moment, that’s okay. 

tbh “the barn of new crystal gems” isn’t actually an awful concept if done right… like just. imagine peridot, bismuth, the rubies and jasper all living under one roof with lapis bunking there occasionally on her trips around the world. the barn just gets more and more added onto it until it is an absolute chaotic mess and everyone loves it.

  • peridot sticks the water silo into the wall and declares it to be her room. she even puts a keep out sign on it with a drawing of her gem on the door like the temple door. inside is ten screens all showing camp pining hearts, the alien doll, and a bunch of other bits of junk peridot has acquired. it looks like a mess but there’s a system to it. only peridot and amethyst understand The System.
  • eyeball suggests they build a training area to keep their skills sharp. her true motivation is to be buff and attract girls. jasper thinks it’s a fantastic idea and praises eyeball for her pragmatism. eyeball didn’t expect her plan to work so quickly but she’s sure as hell not complaining.
  • lapis’s room is the truck. it’s sticking out of the roof and has a tarp over it. there’s loads of meep morps in there. no one is allowed in. especially jasper and peridot.
  • navy has a greenhouse. except it’s a redhouse because she doesn’t get why it’s called a greenhouse if it’s not green and since she’s red she’s going to call it a redhouse. steven gave her cuttings from rose’s gardens to help her get started. one day she will probably go all little shop of horrors on the others.
  • the ruby ship got cannibalised for parts, but it’s still bigger on the inside and is now doc’s room. very serious things happen in this room. mostly viewings of baseball games so that doc and army can figure out how that game actually works.
  • leggy starts trying to figure out how the universe works and ends up making a library for them all to use. peridot, leggy, bismuth and navy start a romance book club. it meets in bismuth’s room because the silo is a disaster, the library isn’t private enough, and the greenhouse is full of weird plants. they draw fusions of their preferred couples. it’s all over the library. jasper’s eye twitches every time she sees it.
  • bismuth was put in charge of the warp pad because she needs to get to her forge. she upgraded everyone’s weapons. every week or so she’ll go to the others with “so i had this idea for improving our gear…” and if the person she talks to is peridot then the results are spectacular. once they tried to make limb enhancers for all of the rubies. including garnet-ruby because they didn’t want her to feel left out. garnet kinda BSOD’d when she saw them because on the one hand EMBARASSING, on the other ADORABLE, on the other OH NO SAPPHY THINKS IT’S CUTE…
  • jasper’s room is completely metal. she made it out of bits of the beta kindergarten. there’s metal bars and random things with spikes on everywhere. and a bunch of mirrors which she can flex at and practise looking awesome. eyeball joins her sometimes.
  • (i have accidentally made the ship of eyeball/jasper. idk it’d be cute???)
  • army insisted on having an actual baseball field set up. she still doesn’t understand the rules but she HAS branched out into other sports. sometimes when the others are being loud a football or hockey stick or something will come flying out of army’s room and hit someone on the head. her aim is impressive. bismuth is very proud.
  • camp pining hearts is a running gag with all of them. they are all SUPER into it for varying reasons. they had to write a treaty to stop the ship wars because the last one saw two rubies, bismuth and peridot all get poofed and that was REALLY awkward to explain to the main crystal gems.
  • centipeetle gets healed and joins them. she introduces them all to chaaaaaaaaps.
2

i wanted someone strong who could protect me// i let his anger fester and infect me

im on mobile n dont rly know how tumblr works here but hEY i tried to draw them angry and,,,,, failed,,, then tried to draw them more cartoony and angry and,,,,,, it still didnt work out whoOPS I CANT EMOTION))

um okay wow thats more notes than i expected whY CANT Y'ALL GO LIKE THIS ON MY INSTA INSTEAD OF HERE LIKE WH A T

anonymous asked:

How do you go about constructing faces i really struggle with it and yours turn out so nice

 so this is shitty but: I drew this very quickly to show the order in which I draw different features, because usually different elements inform how I draw the other parts of the face. A lot of people start out drawing eyes which works for them, but personally I wouldn’t recommend it especially if you’re struggling with it. I still start out drawing the face shape because like I said, it informs the placement of the rest of the facial features.

If you’re having trouble and not already using guidelines I would recommend it! Eventually you’ll get to a point where you won’t need them, but they are very helpful for keeping shit in line (literally) (also remember that they should follow the curve of the head and not be drawn straight on, faces have volume and even though my style is about as flat as it gets in terms of coloring I still try and reflect that.) ex:


There are a few features that i kind of use as ‘built in guidelines’ for faces: such as the ears, which align with the bottom of the nose and the top of your eyebrows. There is a little room to fudge this but this is a good general rule to follow and it helps to remember this when you’re drawing the head at different angles especially.

The hairline is also something that helps me determine the angle of a head, in this really shitty 10 second example I used u notice a lot less of the hairline is visible when the head is angled. (I usually draw out the entire shape of the head underneath the hair, even if the hair obscures the shape)

proportions on the face are hard to nail down, and they used to trip me up a ton when i first started drawing, specifically nose/forehead ratios (i used to draw some looooong faces) so just keep those things in mind. forehead height varies a lot depending on age (for example babies and young kids have larger foreheads, their facial features are lower)

i hope this helps a little, i know i’m not the best at tutorials lmao.

also if i totally misinterpreted your question lemme know I can try and answer the best I can (sometimes I get kind of vague art questions that i have… just no idea how to answer, if you have an art query it usually helps me if u can be as specific as possible with the kinds of issues ur having)

Super quick centaur/horse body tutorial!

You’ve asked me a lot for a centaur tutorial but I absolutely suck at doing stuff like that because I rely so much on my own eye measuring and I almost never do sketches like this, so bear with me.

1: The horse body!


I managed to break down the body into lots of triangles and lines and what have you, in a way that I find easy and accurate to use.
This is the body of Dan, (an english full blood) but it’s really easy to alter between breeds!
For example, I used this when doing the lineup, take two of the most altered ones:

2: Put some meat on it

Keep in mind that if you have no idea how to draw then you probably should just drop this because as you can see I’m skipping ahead assuming you know how to meat a stick figure, and also have a ground feeling of what a horse really should look like.
But it’s starting to take shape, doesn’t it?
The tip of the withers should be around the tip of the hip.

3: Legs and hooves

Make sure you don’t make the knees and hocks too defined
(if you want to draw a full grown horse will say. It works on younger horses and foals though!) And also not like noodles. Watch out for making the hind legs too curved or too straight when standing properly.
You want your hooves to be balanced, keep that in mind!

4: Add the human body

You’ve got a nice red line there to keep track of the spine. Dan’s human part is slim and a bit smaller, which adds to his rather big but slender breed.
Now of course I’m still assuming that you know how to draw humans as well. That’s what it’s about, draw loads of humans and loads of horses and mash them together in a way that you see fit!


I prefer to use colours that the actual breed can have, and to match their hair with their tail. A paint is a difference though, as it might have different pigments in skull and tail root.

This has been a quick and confusing tutorial in which I also claim that I am in no way an expert on this, thank you good night

10

Rhack doodles I did since May (2016), from oldest (top) to newest (bottom)

There’s no consistency in style or anything else cuz I couldn’t figure out how to draw them (I still can’t. These idiots are strangely hard to draw). I wanted to post these before the end of the year- otherwise, they will be forever forgotten in my folder.

inktober 2017 - 18

Ft. this weeks edition of “I am very low on time so how quickly can I draw this character and have it still hopefully be recognizable”

MBTI-School Supplies

Types as school supplies:

ISTJ
Trusty ruler you’ve somehow managed to hold onto for the past 8 years.

ISFJs
The wonderful oversized eraser that has saved you from some of your worst mistakes. Bonus points if it cute or has something written on it.

INFJ
The watch you use in classes where the teachers won’t let you check your phones, and everyone is forced to turn to you to tell them their fate for the next 45 minutes.

INTJ
The stylized planner/journal you carry around in your backpack in order to manage and organize every occurrence and assignment present in your life. Bonus points if it’s a billet Journal…

ISTPs
The personal stapler that saves time when an entire class is scrambling to use the only 1-2 that the teacher provides. A rare™, but practical tool.

ISFPs
The gently used colored pencils that help make even the most boring projects a little more inviting.

INFPs
Favorite book you are currently reading (probably overdue at the library). It’s probably on poetry, art, romance, or death. Bonus points if it’s all three. Thank you for giving us a place to turn to for safety.

INTPs
TI-84, colored graphic calculator. High tech, efficiently, and probably consists of a download application for flappy bird, Tetris, or Pokémon.

ESTP
The brightly colored scissors that are fun to use, but very easy to mess up with because you got a little too scissor-happy… there so fun and common, that you often forget to be careful around their sharp edge.

ESFPs
The bright highlighters that jazz up your notes, and mark up your favorite lines in otherwise boring articles and excerpts. They make a statement, and they’re not easy to hide if they mess up…

ENFPs
Crayola markers, that need to be used skillfully in order to not make your work appear to be done by a 3rd grader, but can look bomb when you nail it. Bright, creative, and playful.

ENTPs
White-out. Always trying to fix other mistakes, but kind of can’t fix their own. Actually really helpful sometimes though. If used wrong though hey can make everything worse…

ESTJ
Those authoritative blue and black pens that draw up outlines and make final revisions to move you on to the finished, polished piece of work. Help keep standards and order, but still easy to get along with.

ESFJs
Sticky notes! Memorable, incredibly helpful, and used not just on campus. These are the notes you use when you want to tell the asshole who parked wrong exactly how you feel. You use them to save yourself when writing essays on books that you borrow from the library or from a class. They remind you of life’s most important necessities, and you’d be kind of lost without them.


ENFJs
Paper clips, the staple substitute for when you need to keep your life together for at least a few more hours. They keep you organized and able to get back to enjoying the fast paced life around you, but don’t let them in on the fact that they may not be fixing everything forever….

ENTJs
Don’t be fooled, these binders get shit done. An entire years worth of class can be neatly organized in these often massive, storing devices. They’re like your textbook, but more personalized. Full of notes, tests, and assignments. They know your mistakes, but they also store some of your greatest achievements.

gingerglides  asked:

Ginger ask for tender fluff of Asami bandaging Korra up after bending practice?

“Asami… you really don’t have to do this… Katara is right there…”

*completely ignoring Korra* “Be more careful!!!!” *stream of light scolding*

——

I’m still working out how to draw them without making them stiff etc. so have some messy doodles as a response until I get the hang of drawing them?

I wouldn’t mind some asks involving nudity since that’d be good practice in drawing the figure :^) (nothing over the top please). 

Thank you for the cute prompt! 

Things I have learned from Assassin’s Creed...

* So next time you’re told that Video games aren’t ‘educational…’ *

- Historical Figures, their names and purpose

- Historical Monuments, when they were built and significance

- Historical Events, when they happened and why

- Various cultures, and traditions

- Take a peek into how people used to live and cope back in the days

- Different weapons, and how they were used

- Animals are actually very useful, I underestimated them before the game

- How much of an asshole a red coat was (Okay all guards and soldiers were assholes…)

- How England managed to spread it’s influence and soldiers across the world

- Famous Ship names, and Ship types. (Schooner, Frigate, Man O’ War, etc…)

- Little charted Islands that I never knew existed ( Tulum, Isla Providencia, etc…)

- Geography (A hell lot)

Keep reading

harvestmoonpeoples  asked:

Hinata being just fine in the heat and kags dying but not wanting to admit it lol. I think that would be fun at least

Kags is internally screaming and wishing Hinata would KEEP STILL AND STOP RUNNING AROUND SO MUCH. Because just watching him is exhausting and making him sweat more. What is this child on?? If he’s not careful he’s gonna pass out.

mavelon  asked:

Any tips on how to do poses or body proportions?

Oh boy, I struggle with that too tbh! What I do is look at references and often go for a feeling like “this looks nice” and be my own critique.

I don’t do this that often anymore but you can try to decompose in geometric shapes/basic lines some poses you find interesting (either be in the internet or magazines~) what I think helps the most it’s the movement lines which, I drew red in these examples~~

Proportions may be the basics but those can be different for each drawing style, still I do recommend to study some anatomy and practice a lot!! Try to start with something simple and not to complicated like some torso pics and don’t be afraid to look at references or to do mistakes, we all are learning so it’s totally ok!

Here more stuff and as you may notice, not all of them have the same proportions but somehow they look “proportional” and since I’m still not confident enough in complicated poses, these are some simple ones :3

Also you can try simple skeletons with just circles and lines, then you can start building the pose from that.

Hope this helps you! I’m not that good explaining things

2

So @oolongearlgrey‘s doing this cool thing where you can submit a garbage MS Paint drawing of a succubus and he’ll redraw it being all nice and shiny. I got out MS Paint and drew this sneering succubus with my touchpad and submitted it but I liked her design so much that I got excited and did my own redraw before he even got to mine heheh. I tried to keep her looking like she’d fit in Oolong’s world. 

achoicewithsomeregrets  asked:

So, I'm impressed with quite a lot about your writing, but one of the things I'm impressed with the most is how you do characters. The characters are just really /Real/ and alive and vivid. My characters are round and have flaws and motivations and everything that smart people say good characters need to have, but. They're still just not as /Real/ as yours. So if you have time, could you give some tips for developing characters? Thanks!

Dear protecterwinsmith,

Let’s say someone asked you to draw a person. 

If you’d never drawn a person before or thought you didn’t have much time, you might do one of these guys:

Example A: stick dude. A stick dude is recognizable as a person because it follows the baseline, easiest rules of personhood. It’s got a head, a torso, a familiar arrangement of limbs. You don’t need more to get the concept of “person” across. 

Now, if you had a bit of experience drawing people or thought you had more time, you might do something more like

Example B: Cartoon Dude. Cartoon Dude is even easier to recognize as a human. He follows the rules of personhood even more: he’s got facial features, ears, hair, clothing, shoes. You can tell one cartoon dude from another cartoon dude. You can populate an entire series with cartoon dudes and the storytelling would work, because they would effectively follow the baseline rules of human anatomy as well as being unique enough to tell apart. 

Now let’s say you had a bit more time or you had some more experience drawing people and someone asked you to draw a human realistically. Depending on how much you’d done it, you might get

Example C: 3-D dude without reference. A 3-D dude drawn without reference is even more recognizable as human. He can hold all sorts of nuance in his expression because he follows the baseline rules of personhood even better than the previous two. More nuance means more empathy from the viewer, and more empathy usually means more emotional resonance.

And finally, let’s say someone asks you to draw a human but gives you an actual person to look at. In the same amount of time given, you might end up with

Example D: Portrait with reference. This guy (one of my brothers, in fact) follows the rules of personhood, their effectiveness limited only by my ability to capture them in the time given or by my level of experience. He’s recognizable as both a person and an individual because of the specificity of his facial features, and moreover, he is unlikely to look like any other person I would draw using this method because of my close adherence to his, you know, actual face.

If you think about this in terms of characters, you could build a novel with any one of these sorts of character.

Example A: A novel built with stick man characters would be incredibly stylized. Fairy tales are often stick figure characters. Instead of being fully-fleshed individuals, they’re types. This is the stick figure woodsman (we can tell it’s him, he’s drawn with an ax). This is the princess (we can tell it’s her, she’s got a crown and some long hair added to the stick figure). This is the knight (we can tell it’s him, he’s got a sword and a stick horse). People don’t actually look like stick figures, but as long as the characters are all stick figures, the narrative still works at some level, because it tells you the rules and follows them, even if they aren’t the rules of reality. The moment you draw one character as something more than a stick figure, though, the viewer suddenly realizes how the others are merely made of straight lines. 

Example B: When I first began to write, I used to write novels with accidental cartoon characters. I knew I couldn’t populate a novel with stick figures, so I tried to flesh them out. What makes a human a human? I asked myself desperately. Specifics! I made character worksheets and dutifully filled them out with attributes. Height, hair color, eye color, hobbies, place of residence, parental occupation, etc. etc. I ended up with characters who followed the rules of being human, and they could carry a story, but they still didn’t feel real. 

I’m skipping Example C for now, because it’s a byproduct, for me, of failing to remember the lessons of Example D.

Example D: Example D is how I build characters now. I begin by studying real people instead of by creating lists of traits. I end up with shadows I forgot to draw in my cartoon version, hair that looks like actual hair instead of what I sort of remember what hair looks like, and feet that have all the toes drawn in because with a reference, I can remember how to accurately draw a pinkie toe. Real people are complicated and surprising. If I were building a character with a fear of water without looking at a real person, I might give them the phobia because they’d nearly drowned once: the easiest and most logical answer. It wouldn’t necessarily be wrong — it would follow rules that a reader would understand. But if I looked at a real person with a fear of water, I might discover that their fear developed because of an obsession with quantifying the abstract, and trying to understand the concept of an infinite body of water made them anxious. A much more complicated answer, but more specific and more real because of it. If I populate a book with characters built like this, I’m going to end up with a nuanced story that should have more emotional resonance. Moreover, the more I study real humans and build characters from them, the less I have to lean on real humans to make secondary characters. As I learn the more subtle rules of how people’s personalities are made, I can start to build new humans who don’t exist — who nonetheless appear as if they could. 

Example C: I’m returning to example C because it’s a cautionary tale for me. Even though I feel that I’m worlds better than that old version of me writing cartoony people who could only exist in a two-dimensional place, if I get lazy with my character development, or if I try to create a sort of person I’ve never met in real life from scratch, I can still end up with one of these weird cartoon-realistic hybrids. A character who nearly looks real but lacks the subtle, observed nuances that I can only get from keeping an eye on real life. These characters follow the rules, and they have back stories and hobbies and nuance, but they’re still lacking the surprising, non-linear subtleties of a real person, or they’re lacking the specificity that comes from studying a real-life elbow and carefully transcribing the shape of it.  

There are particular sorts of things I look for in real people when I’m stealing bits and bobs, but that is a topic for another blog post. For now, I’m going to go figure out why I still can’t draw feet.

urs,

Stiefvater