still working on a name for her

What we know about season 8:

Fiona:

- Faces struggles with owning her new building

- Doesn’t get along with Mel (Perry Matfeld)

- Doesn’t want anything to do with the meth situation

- Gets involved with the meth situation to fix what he kids fucked up.

- doesn’t get along with any tenants

- becomes friends with (1) one tenant, Nessa who is dating Mel

Lip:

- Is staying sober

- Is on a break from Sierra because of staying sober

- finds it hard to get laid being sober

- is getting $$$ from selling his meth

- gets jealous of Sierra with other men

- still very much into Sierra

- possibly gets a new job

Ian:

- still working as an EMT

- still involved with Trevor and now involved with Trevor’s work

- Is involved with an LGBT inspired protest

- gets into trouble with the whole meth situation

- possibly tries too hard to get involved with Trevor’s job

- gets a tattoo for Monica, only it ends up being tits and he isn’t impressed.

Debbie:

- still working on her trade

- gets a job to help support Franny

- helps her brothers with the meth situation to get herself money for Franny

- Franny starts walking

- possible new love interest

Carl:

- comes home from Military school a changed man, not too changed though.

- takes responsibility with selling his siblings inherited meth for them

- wants to help a war vet

- has some kind of love interest

- gets into meth related trouble with his siblings

Liam:

- still in school

- still cute af

- frank gets further involved in his school

- is good in art class

Frank:

- gets an actual job

- wants to be 20 again to restart his life

- is grieving Monica’s death

- he’s on meth

- gets involved with parents group at Liam’s school

- becomes some kind of saint, robes and all

- seems to be a good dad for five seconds

Kev:

- Is still working at that club

- possibly exchanges sexual favours to make extra money

- is diagnosed with (possible) breast cancer

- probably believes he is dying and is high key stressed about his surgery

- on top of that the Alibi is still run by Svetlana.

V:

- isn’t taking Svetlana’s bar stealing very well

- tries to take it back from her in any way that she can, even calling immigration

- gets into a physical fight with Svetlana over it.

- still involved with Yevgeny

Svetlana:

- turns the Alibi into a Russian bar

- names it Putin’s paradise

- gets into fight with V

- probably still loves her (maybe I am just hoping lol)

anonymous asked:

Hey, could you do a fic where Frank finds Karen asleep at her laptop or something and so he puts her to bed, thanks c:

This ended up being influenced by the second trailer so it’s more TP setting than not; hope that’s okay!!

With her chin precariously leaning against the edge of her palm, her other hand’s already fallen to press against the laptop haphazardly. An endless string of G’s roll out on the otherwise blank text document taking up the screen and he doesn’t need to push back her fan of hair to confirm that she’s fast asleep. Micro continues tapping away unperturbed at his desk a couple feet away.

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

unpopular opinion: ppl preach "Bev is such a strong independent female role model" but then ignore the strong black character who IS a main character, a fat character who can still fend for himself and isn't made into a joke the entire film, and a Jewish character LITERALLY NAME ANY OTHER MOVIE CHARACTER NOTABLY JEWISH I CAN THINK OF LIKE ONE you can't preach about unfair gender roles in movies and then ignore any of the other minority represented in this movie like that isn't how this works

bev really was kinda one dimensional imo (literally only interacted with her love interests in the movie, wasnt well developed in the book) so i try to make her stronger bc shes not even that great canonically tbh. agree

anonymous asked:

I came out to my friends about two months ago as ftm and they've been really good about using my name although they still struggle with pronouns. The thing is, the pronouns don't bother me right now because I'm not able to fully come out, so while they're working on using he/him, it doesn't bother me when they say she/her. It makes me feel like I'm faking being trans because it doesn't bother me. It constantly kicks up my anxiety because I feel like I'm really just a butch lesbian. Sigh.

You’re not faking it. Some people can be more comfortable with certain things than others. I’m the same way, wrong pronouns really don’t mess me up as much! You are still trans and still 100% valid
-Rowan

2

The Jacquet household:

Denise: Denise was never the chef, that was her husband. Following his death she had big shoes to fill in the bakery, and still does! Sales went down due to the change in taste of the sweets, but Denise is improving and hopes the bakery will once more be a cherished Bluewater business. Right now she mostly concerns herself with the bakery, and if Gilbert is ever going to find a nice young lady to settle down with.

Gilbert: Born in Bluewater, Gilbert still tries to convey foreign charm his name and family suggest. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t. He’s quite the ladies man, but lately it’s been just one lady, Chasity Gere. Will things between the two work out, or are two romance sims doomed to fail?

Dead Fandoms, Part 3

Read Part One of Dead Fandoms here. 

Read Part Two of Dead Fandoms here. 

Before we continue, I want to add the usual caveat that I actually don’t want to be right about these fandoms being dead. I like enthusiasm and energy and it’s a shame to see it vanish.


Mists of Avalon

Remember that period of time of about 15 years, where absolutely everybody read this book and was obsessed with it? It could not have been bigger, and the fandom was Anne Rice huge, overlapping for several years with USENET and the early World Wide Web…but it’s since petered out. 

Mists of Avalon’s popularity may be due to the most excellent case of hitting a demographic sweet spot ever. The book was a feminist retelling of the Arthurian Mythos where Morgan Le Fay is the main character, a pagan from matriarchal goddess religions who is fighting against encroaching Christianity and patriarchal forms of society coming in with it. Also, it made Lancelot bisexual and his conflict is how torn he is about his attraction to both Arthur and Guinevere.

Remember, this novel came out in 1983 – talk about being ahead of your time! If it came out today, the reaction from a certain corner would be something like “it is with a heavy heart that I inform you that tumblr is at it again.”

Man, demographically speaking, that’s called “nailing it.” It used to be one of the favorite books of the kind of person who’s bookshelf is dominated by fantasy novels about outspoken, fiery-tongued redheaded women, who dream of someday moving to Scotland, who love Enya music and Kate Bush, who sell homemade needlepoint stuff on etsy, who consider their religious beliefs neo-pagan or wicca, and who have like 15 cats, three of which are named Isis, Hypatia, and Morrigan.

This type of person is still with us, so why did this novel fade in popularity? There’s actually a single hideous reason: after her death around 2001, facts came out that Marion Zimmer Bradley abused her daughters sexually. Even when she was alive, she was known for defending and enabling a known child abuser, her husband, Walter Breen. To say people see your work differently after something like this is an understatement – especially if your identity is built around being a progressive and feminist author.


Robotech

I try to break up my sections on dead fandoms into three parts: first, I explain the property, then explain why it found a devoted audience, and finally, I explain why that fan devotion and community went away. Well, in the case of Robotech, I can do all three with a single sentence: it was the first boy pilot/giant robot Japanimation series that shot for an older, teenage audience to be widely released in the West. Robotech found an audience when it was the only true anime to be widely available, and lost it when became just another import anime show. In the days of Crunchyroll, it’s really hard to explain what made Robotech so special, because it means describing a different world.

Try to imagine what it was like in 1986 for Japanime fans: there were barely any video imports, and if you wanted a series, you usually had to trade tapes at your local basement club (they were so precious they couldn’t even be sold, only traded). If you were lucky, you were given a script to translate what you were watching. Robotech though, was on every day, usually after school. You want an action figure? Well, you could buy a Robotech Valkyrie or a Minmei figure at your local corner FAO Schwartz. 

However, the very strategy that led to it getting syndicated is the very reason it was later vilified by the purists who emerged when anime became a widespread cultural force: strictly speaking, there actually is no show called “Robotech.” Since Japanese shows tend to be short run, say, 50-60 episodes, it fell well under the 80-100 episode mark needed for syndication in the US. The producer of Harmony Gold, Carl Macek, had a solution: he’d cut three unrelated but similar looking series together into one, called “Robotech.” The shows looked very similar, had similar love triangles, used similar tropes, and even had little references to each other, so the fit was natural. It led to Robotech becoming a weekday afternoon staple with a strong fandom who called themselves “Protoculture Addicts.” There were conventions entirely devoted to Robotech. The supposed shower scene where Minmei was bare-breasted was the barely whispered stuff of pervert legend in pre-internet days. And the tie in novels, written with the entirely western/Harmony Gold conception of the series and which continued the story, were actually surprisingly readable.

The final nail in the coffin of Robotech fandom was the rise of Sailor Moon, Toonami, Dragonball, and yes, Pokemon (like MC Hammer’s role in popularizing hip hop, Pokemon is often written out of its role in creating an audience for the next wave of cartoon imports out of insecurity). Anime popularity in the West can be defined as not a continuing unbroken chain like scifi book fandom is, but as an unrelated series of waves, like multiple ancient ruins buried on top of each other (Robotech was the vanguard of the third wave, as Anime historians reckon); Robotech’s wave was subsumed by the next, which had different priorities and different “core texts.” Pikachu did what the Zentraedi and Invid couldn’t do: they destroyed the SDF-1.


Legion of Super-Heroes

Legion of Superheroes was comic set in the distant future that combined superheroes with space opera, with a visual aesthetic that can best be described as “Star Trek: the Motion Picture, if it was set in a disco.” 

I’ve heard wrestling described as “a soap opera for men.” If that’s the case, then Legion of Super-Heroes was a soap opera for nerds. The book is about attractive 20-somethings who seem to hook up all the time. As a result, it had a large female fanbase, which, I cannot stress enough, is incredibly unusual for this era in comics history. And if you have female fans, you get a lot of shipping and slashfic, and lots of speculation over which of the boy characters in the series is gay. The fanon answer is Element Lad, because he wore magenta-pink and never had a girlfriend. (Can’t argue with bulletproof logic like that.) In other words, it was a 1970s-80s fandom that felt much more “modern” than the more right-brained, bloodless, often anal scifi fandoms that existed around the same time, where letters pages were just nitpicking science errors by model train and elevator enthusiasts.

Legion Headquarters seemed to be a rabbit fuck den built around a supercomputer and Danger Room. Cosmic Boy dressed like Tim Curry in Rocky Horror. There’s one member, Duo Damsel, who can turn into two people, a power that, in the words of Legion writer Jim Shooter, was “useful for weird sex…and not much else.”

LSH was popular because the fans were insanely horny. This is, beyond the shadow of a doubt, the thirstiest fandom of all time.  You might think I’m overselling this, but I really think that’s an under-analyzed part of how some kinds of fiction build a devoted fanbase.  

For example, a big reason for the success of Mass Effect is that everyone has a favorite girl or boy, and you have the option to romance them. Likewise, everyone who was a fan of Legion remembers having a crush. Sardonic Ultra Boy for some reason was a favorite among gay male nerds (aka the Robert Conrad Effect). Tall, blonde, amazonian telepath Saturn Girl, maybe the first female team leader in comics history, is for the guys with backbone who prefer Veronica over Betty. Shrinking Violet was a cute Audrey Hepburn type. And don’t forget Shadow Lass, who was a blue skinned alien babe with pointed ears and is heavily implied to have an accent (she was Aayla Secura before Aayla Secura was Aayla Secura). Light Lass was commonly believed to be “coded lesbian” because of a short haircut and her relationships with men didn’t work out. The point is, it’s one thing to read about the adventures of a superteam, and it implies a totally different level of mental and emotional involvement to read the adventures of your imaginary girlfriend/boyfriend.  

Now, I should point out that of all the fandoms I’ve examined here, LSH was maybe the smallest. Legion was never a top seller, but it was a favorite of the most devoted of fans who kept it alive all through the seventies and eighties with an energy and intensity disproportionate to their actual numbers. My gosh, were LSH fans devoted! Interlac and Legion Outpost were two Legion fanzines that are some of the most famous fanzines in comics history.

If nerd culture fandoms were drugs, Star Wars would be alcohol, Doctor Who would be weed, but Legion of Super-Heroes would be injecting heroin directly into your eyeballs. Maybe it is because the Legionnaires were nerdy, too: they played Dungeons and Dragons in their off time (an escape, no doubt, from their humdrum, mundane lives as galaxy-rescuing superheroes). There were sometimes call outs to Monty Python. Basically, the whole thing had a feel like the dorkily earnest skits or filk-singing at a con. Legion felt like it’s own fan series, guest starring Patton Oswalt and Felicia Day.

It helped that the boundary between fandom and professional was incredibly porous. For instance, pro-artist Dave Cockrum did covers for Legion fanzines. Former Legion APA members Todd and Mary Biernbaum got a chance to actually write Legion, where, with the gusto of former slashfic writers given the keys to canon, their major contribution was a subplot that explicitly made Element Lad gay. Mike Grell, a professional artist who got paid to work on the series, did vaguely porno-ish fan art. Again, it’s hard to tell where the pros started and the fandom ended; the inmates were running the asylum.

Mostly, Legion earned this devotion because it could reward it in a way no other comic could. Because Legion was not a wide market comic but was bought by a core audience, after a point, there were no self-contained one-and-done Legion stories. In fact, there weren’t even really arcs as we know it, which is why Legion always has problems getting reprinted in trade form. Legion was plotted like a daytime soap opera: there were always five different stories going on in every issue, and a comic involved cutting between them. Sure, like daytime soap operas, there’s never a beginning, just endless middles, so it was totally impossible for a newbie to jump on board…but soap operas know what they are doing: long term storytelling rewards a long term reader.

This brings me to today, where Legion is no longer being published by DC. There is no discussion about a movie or TV revival. This is amazing. Comics are a world where the tiniest nerd groups get pandered to: Micronauts, Weirdworld, Seeker 3000, and Rom have had revival series, for pete’s sake. It’s incredible there’s no discussion of a film or TV treatment, either; friggin Cyborg from New Teen Titans is getting a solo movie. 

Why did Legion stop being such a big deal? Where did the fandom that supported it dissolve to? One word: X-Men. Legion was incredibly ahead of its time. In the 60s and 70s, there were barely any “fan” comics, since superhero comics were like animation is today: mostly aimed at kids, with a minority of discerning adult/teen fans, and it was success among kids, not fans, that led to something being a top seller (hence, “fan favorites” in the 1970s, as surprising as it is to us today, often did not get a lot of work, like Don MacGregor or Barry Smith). But as newsstands started to push comics out, the fan audience started to get bigger and more important…everyone else started to catch up to the things that made Legion unique: most comics started to have attractive people who paired up into couples and/or love triangles, and featured extremely byzantine long term storytelling. If Legion of Super-Heroes is going to be remembered for anything, it’s for being the smaller scale “John the Baptist” to the phenomenon of X-Men, the ultimate “fan” comic.

The other thing that killed Legion, apart from Marvel’s Merry Mutants, that is, was the r-word: reboots. A reboot only works for some properties, but not others. You reboot something when you want to find something for a mass audience to respond to, like with Zorro, Batman, or Godzilla.

Legion, though, was not a comic for everybody, it was a fanboy/girl comic beloved by a niche who read it for continuing stories and minutiae (and to jack off, and in some cases, jill off). Rebooting a comic like that is a bad idea. You do not reboot something where the main way you engage with the property, the greatest strength, is the accumulated lore and history. Rebooting a property like that means losing the reason people like it, and unless it’s something with a wide audience, you only lose fans and won’t get anything in return for it. So for something like Legion (small fandom obsessed with long form plots and details, but unlike Trek, no name recognition) a reboot is the ultimate Achilles heel that shatters everything, a self-destruct button they kept hitting over and over and over until there was nothing at all left.


E. E. Smith’s Lensman Novels

The Lensman series is like Gil Evans’s jazz: it’s your grandparents’ favorite thing that you’ve never heard of. 

I mean, have you ever wondered exactly what scifi fandom talked about before the rise of the major core texts and cultural objects (Star Trek, Asimov, etc)? Well, it was this. Lensmen was the subject of fanfiction mailed in manilla envelopes during the 30s, 40s, and 50s (some of which are still around). If you’re from Boston, you might recognize that the two biggest and oldest scifi cons there going back to the 1940s, Boskone (Boscon, get it?) and Arisia, are references to the Lensman series. This series not only created space opera as we know it, but contributed two of the biggest visuals in scifi, the interstellar police drawn from different alien species, and space marines in power armor.

My favorite sign of how big this series was and how fans responded to it, was a great wedding held at Worldcon that duplicated Kimball Kinnison and Clarissa’s wedding on Klovia. This is adorable:

The basic story is pure good vs. evil: galactic civilization faces a crime and piracy wave of unprecedented proportions from technologically advanced pirates (the memory of Prohibition, where criminals had superior firearms and faster cars than the cops, was strong by the mid-1930s). A young officer, Kimball Kinnison (who speaks in a Stan Lee esque style of dialogue known as “mid-century American wiseass”), graduates the academy and is granted a Lens, an object from an ancient mystery civilization, who’s true purpose is unknown.

Lensman Kinnison discovers that the “crime wave” is actually a hostile invasion and assault by a totally alien culture that is based on hierarchy, intolerant of failure, and at the highest level, is ruled by horrifying nightmare things that breathe freezing poison gases. Along the way, he picks up allies, like van Buskirk, a variant human space marine from a heavy gravity planet who can do a standing jump of 20 feet in full space armor, Worsel, a telepathic dragon warrior scientist with the technical improvisation skills of MacGyver (who reads like the most sadistically minmaxed munchkinized RPG character of all time), and Nandreck, a psychologist from a Pluto-like planet of selfish cowards.

The scale of the conflict starts small, just skirmishes with pirates, but explodes to near apocalyptic dimensions. This series has space battles with millions of starships emerging from hyperspacial tubes to attack the ultragood Arisians, homeworld of the first intelligent race in the cosmos. By the end of the fourth book, there are mind battles where the reflected and parried mental beams leave hundreds of innocent bystanders dead. In the meantime we get evil Black Lensmen, the Hell Hole in Space, and superweapons like the Negasphere and the Sunbeam, where an entire solar system was turned into a vacuum tube.

It’s not hard to understand why Lensmen faded in importance. While the alien Lensmen had lively psychologies, Lensman Kimball Kinnison was not an interesting person, and that’s a problem when scifi starts to become more about characterization. The Lensman books, with their love of police and their sexism (it is an explicit plot point that the Lens is incompatible with female minds – in canon there are no female Lensmen) led to it being judged harshly by the New Wave writers of the 1960s, who viewed it all as borderline fascist military-scifi establishment hokum, and the reputation of the series never recovered from the spirit of that decade.


Prisoner of Zenda

Prisoner of Zenda is a novel about a roguish con-man who visits a postage-stamp, charmingly picturesque Central European kingdom with storybook castles, where he finds he looks just like the local king and is forced to pose as him in palace intrigues. It’s a swashbuckling story about mistaken identity, swordfighting, and intrigue, one part swashbuckler and one part dark political thriller.

The popularity of this book predates organized fandom as we know it, so I wonder if “fandom” is even the right word to use. All the same, it inspired fanatical dedication from readers. There was such a popular hunger for it that an entire library could be filled with nothing but rip-offs of Prisoner of Zenda. If you have a favorite writer who was active between 1900-1950, I guarantee he probably wrote at least one Prisoner of Zenda rip-off (which is nearly always the least-read book in his oeuvre). The only novel in the 20th Century that inspired more imitators was Sherlock Holmes. Robert Heinlein and Edmond “Planet Smasher” Hamilton wrote scifi updates of Prisoner of Zenda. Doctor Who lifted the plot wholesale for the Tom Baker era episode, “Androids of Tara,” Futurama did this exact plot too, and even Marvel Comics has its own copy of Ruritania, Doctor Doom’s Kingdom of Latveria. Even as late as the 1980s, every kids’ cartoon did a “Prisoner of Zenda” episode, one of the stock plots alongside “everyone gets hit by a shrink ray” and the Christmas Carol episode.

Prisoner of Zenda imitators were so numerous, that they even have their own Library of Congress sub-heading, of “Ruritanian Romance.” 

One major reason that Prisoner of Zenda fandom died off is that, between World War I and World War II, there was a brutal lack of sympathy for anything that seemed slightly German, and it seems the incredibly Central European Prisoner of Zenda was a casualty of this. Far and away, the largest immigrant group in the United States through the entire 19th Century were Germans, who were more numerous than Irish or Italians. There were entire cities in the Midwest that were two-thirds German-born or German-descent, who met in Biergartens and German community centers that now no longer exist.

Kurt Vonnegut wrote a lot about how the German-American world he grew up in vanished because of the prejudice of the World Wars, and that disappearance was so extensive that it was retroactive, like someone did a DC comic-style continuity reboot where it all never happened: Germans, despite being the largest immigrant group in US history, are left out of the immigrant story. The “Little Bohemias” and “Little Berlins” that were once everywhere no longer exist. There is no holiday dedicated to people of German ancestry in the US, the way the Irish have St. Patrick’s Day or Italians have Columbus Day (there is Von Steuben’s Day, dedicated to a general who fought with George Washington, but it’s a strictly Midwest thing most people outside the region have never heard of, like Sweetest Day). If you’re reading this and you’re an academic, and you’re not sure what to do your dissertation on, try writing about the German-American immigrant world of the 19th and 20th Centuries, because it’s a criminally under-researched topic.


A. Merritt

Pop quiz: who was the most popular and influential fantasy author during the 1930s and 40s? 

If you answered Tolkien or Robert E. Howard, you’re wrong - it was actually Abraham Merritt. He was the most popular writer of his age of the kind of fiction he did, and he’s since been mostly forgotten. Gary Gygax, creator of Dungeons and Dragons, has said that A. Merritt was his favorite fantasy and horror novelist.

Why did A. Merritt and his fandom go away, when at one point, he was THE fantasy author? Well, obviously one big answer was the 1960s counterculture, which brought different writers like Tolkien and Lovecraft to the forefront (by modern standards Lovecraft isn’t a fantasy author, but he was produced by the same early century genre-fluid effluvium that produced Merritt and the rest). The other answer is that A. Merritt was so totally a product of the weird occult speculation of his age that it’s hard to even imagine him clicking with audiences in other eras. His work is based on fringe weirdness that appealed to early 20th Century spiritualism and made sense at the time: reincarnation, racial memory, an obsession with lost race stories and the stone age, and weirdness like the 1920s belief that the Polar Arctic is the ancestral home of the Caucasian race. In other words, it’s impossible to explain Merritt without a ton of sentences that start with “well, people in the 1920s thought that…” That’s not a good sign when it comes to his universality. 


That’s it for now. Do you have any suggestions on a dead fandom, or do you keep one of these “dead” fandoms alive in your heart?

Would you believe this was inspired by the beginning of Shrek? Yes. Because it’s the same.


“Next!”

Stiles dragged his feet a bit as Hilda tugged him forward in line. He was chained up and surrounded by guards, probably about to be sold into slavery, but he still wasn’t going to make this easy for the old broad.

He’d been buying her produce for years, and this was how she repaid him? Selling him to the king for some supernatural creature bounty? No. He was going to make this as difficult as possible.

She glared her beady little eyes at him, dug her sharp nails into his arm a bit more, and shoved him forward another lurching step. The fae at the front of the line was deemed worth twenty pounds, ten shillings and hauled off by knights in armor.

“Next!”

A hellhound was dragged forward in an iron collar.

“I will give you money if you just let me go,” Stiles whispered, he wasn’t above bargaining, but Hilda ignored him. He didn’t have much, but it was probably more than she’d get from these chumps. “Six shillings, right now.”

Hilda rolled her eyes and tugged him forward by the chain looped around his wrists. The hellhound was appraised and hauled off into the back of a closed wagon. It was no doubt magically reinforced; Stiles could still hear it snarling violently, but it wasn’t breaking through the old rickety wooden sides.

“Next!”

“Ten shillings,” Stiles continued, “right as soon as I can get to the bank. Twenty, even! Three pounds!”

Hilda gave him a withering look. “You don’t have that kind of money. Now shut up.” She yanked on his chain and both wrists burned as the iron manacles scraped against the already raw skin. The iron was bad enough without all of the jerking around.

Another supernatural creature was carried off to the wagon—this time a nymph—and then it was Stiles’ turn.

Keep reading

Bruise [ II ]

Genre [Rating] : Angst [M]

Length: 10.3k

Pairing: Chanyeol x Reader

Summary: He wasn’t yours, and you weren’t his, but that couldn’t stop your heart from believing otherwise.

Bruise Masterlist

Originally posted by pcycho61

The cool air whipping at your skin made a shiver spread along your spine, hands rubbing at your biceps as your teeth chattered behind your pressed together lips. Loud laughter and screams filled the air, the night lit up by warm orange hues of carnival rides and haunted houses. Your feet felt stiff, trapped in a pair of uncomfortable sneakers you regretted wearing, eyes glued to the back of Minseok’s head as he told your friends something apparently hilarious. It was far too cold out to be stuck in a stupid line for a stupid haunted house in a tank top and torn up skinny jeans. You were too annoyed to continue being stuck in front of Chanyeol and Sehun as they flirted with a group of girls behind you, Chanyeol’s cologne wafting to your nose whenever he moved his arms about.

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

You're a fucking loser with indy books barely making money. Who gives a shit what you think about making comics.

I received a bunch of messages in this vein, but yours didn’t have any political rants or racial epithets, so you get a response. Congrats.

When it comes to writing blog posts about making comics, I’ve always tried to make it clear that I am not a guru and don’t have anything close to all the answers.

Maybe that’s okay.

Survival bias is a state where people concentrate on only the most exemplary subjects and try to emulate them, not realizing that they’re the exception, not something typical. 

If you try to figure out how to be a “huge successful writer” by only looking at superstars and big moneymakers, you’re almost certainly going to fail. Don’t get me wrong, every creative person has tremendous hardships and rejections in their careers at different points, but the level of success a J.K. Rowling, Stephen King or Robert Kirkman now have is highly unusual and not something you can reproduce.

Maybe it’s a good idea to get a bit of advice from someone currently in the trenches, someone slowly building their name bit by bit who’s honest about what worked and what didn’t as they go along.

I’ll admit, there’s still survival bias involved in my career (many people pitch their ideas to Image, many more want to work at Marvel), but I try to temper my optimistic advice with reality wherever I can. It may not be as impressive, but it’s certainly more realistic.

I’ve known friends and colleagues who wanted their creative careers to appear like Athena, a perfect armored warrior-goddess instantly striking awe and fear into all around her, who sprung fully formed from the forehead of Zeus. (Seriously, that’s the legend. Mythology is fucking weird and awesome).

It doesn’t happen that way. It never will. The people I’ve known who acted that way about creativity quickly burned out on top of a pile of half-baked concepts and unfinished work. They wanted blinding inspiration and success or nothing and nothing was what they got.

If you make things you will struggle, screw up, and hate the choices you’ve made at times, but if you stick with it you will also learn and grow. Sometimes it won’t be about money. Other times that, and keeping a roof over your head, might be your only concern. Everyone’s journey is different. You can learn a bit from other people but in the end you have to go out there and do it yourself.

If you’re spending your time staring at my little bar charts shaking your fist about my success or lack thereof, you’re using way too much energy in an unproductive way. Go make stuff or go looking for Athena and see where it gets you.

I’m ready to chill with my new dorky star-baby…

7

sooo thanks to reading heartstrings by @taylordraws i was up til 3am doodling this garbage. god help my lost soul.

also i’d been talking to @littleblackchat all day about it and she was designing up what she imagined Mari’s dress from chapter 3 looked like, and I doodled this version based on her descriptions and early doodles of it xD so it’s a little different from the one she posted. Also I pointed out that the keyhole in the dress was perfect for Adrien in that scene, since he put his hand there and gyid7573943778hsjdfj IMAGINE IT GUYS imagine it

3

her name is taco tuesday and she sleeps with her tail on her face and every day when I come home from work I ask her if she knows that tacocat spelled backwards is still tacocat.


she doesn’t because cats can’t read but she still meows at me and I love her

Neighbor kept reporting me to the HOA for petty things, opportunity knocked to pay her back and I took it.

I found out today that my revenge was complete so I came here to share it.

My neighbor who we shall call Chirsty would report us to our HOA for literally everything she didn’t like. Trash can still on the street at 5 PM on Trash day, reported. Kids bike outside while kids are still playing, reported. Didn’t mow this weekend (typically I do this Monday nights), reported Monday morning. Dog barking at 2 in the afternoon as she and her dog walk on the path behind our house, reported. In many cases these were not issues covered by the HOA, but due to repeated reporting the board did fine us and I had to go spend the evening waiting through a 2 hour meeting to have them removed. This kept happening and was driving me nuts. Both my wife and I spoke to her and tried to find out why she felt this was ok and she told us, “You just need to do a better job being a good neighbor.”

Fast forward to early this summer. She posts on a neighborhood website sharing a video about the anti-vax movement. In general the replies are pretty aggressive about telling her she is full of it, but she keeps pushing back leading to a super long post about how we all are wrong and we should listen because she is a doctor. She signs it “Dr Christy Lastname, Naturopathic Physician”

At this point I am mostly just wondering what the heck any kind of doctor would be against vaccines. This made no sense to me so I started digging. I did find that Christy was listed as a doctor on sites where you could find physicians. I dug more into what exactly a Naturopathic Physician was and found that in my state of Colorado they are regulated and required to maintain a license to practice. I checked into it and found out the following

  1. Christy was NOT in the state database as a Naturopathic Physician
  2. The board who regulates it has an online reporting tool

At this point I took all the information I had, grabbed screenshots and checked my timeline and reported her as claiming to be a Naturopathic Physician when she was not.

I then followed that up with this post on the neighborhood website:


  • This is a hot button topic for me and because of that and Christy signing her post as “Dr Lastname” I had to dig some. I for one am a HUGE fan of including whole person treatment. I think Doctors of Osteopathic medicine are wonderful as they work to integrate whole health into the picture with well researched medical best practices. Naturopathy less so which is the problem here. One researched article here: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15208545/ breaks down a lot of the issues quite well. It is almost 13 years old, but still quite good at explaining the valid concerns. I further checked as Colorado DOES regulate naturopathy and I could not find any Christy Lastname listed there. My thought was that it is entirely possible that she holds a license to practice in Colorado and my search wasn’t working, but even just searching her first name or zip code or “MyTown” or “TownNearUs” provides no results for a Christy Lastname. There are 2 Naturopathic doctors in TownNearUs, I used this search: apps.colorado.gov/dora/licensing/Lookup/LicenseLookup.aspx linked from this page: colorado.gov/pacific/dora/Naturopathy

At this point Christy locked the post and later deleted the entire thing. I was pretty dang happy that she removed the post, but today it got better. In the mail I received a copy of the cease and desist letter that Christy received form the state about a month ago. It told her that she must cease and desist her “practice” immediately.

The Batman Rogues as Spongebob Quotes

Scarecrow: The sash wringing… the trash thinging… mash flinging… the flash springing, bringing the the crash thinging the… HASH SLINGING SLASHER!

Riddler: You may be an open book Spongebob, but I am a bit more complicated than that. The inner machinations of my mind are an enigma

Killer Croc: Do you smell it? That smell, the kind of smelly smell. A smelly smell that smells…smelly

Two-Face: Isn’t this great Squidward? Just you & me together for hours and hours and hours! And then the sun’ll come up, and it’ll be tomorrow, and we’ll still be working! It’ll be just like a sleepover! Only we’ll be sweaty and covered with grease!

Penguin: Hmm, a five letter word for happiness…money!

Mad Hatter: So you mean to say they’ve taken what we thought we think and make us think we thought our thoughts we’ve been thinking our thoughts we think we thought?…I think.

Catwoman: Because of her mysterious behavior, I have decided to name her Mystery…Now that I think about it she’s also very graceful and majestic. Perhaps I should name her Grace or Majesty…or Debbie.

Poison Ivy: I’ll have you know I stubbed my toe last week while watering my spice garden and I only cried for twenty minutes.

Harley Quinn:  See, no one says “cool” anymore. That’s such an old person thing. Now we say “coral”, as in “That nose job is so coral.”

The Joker: F is for fire that burns down the whole town, U is for Uranium…bombs! N is for no survivors!

Mr. Freeze: I slipped on an ice cube and got covered in boo-boos!

Firefly: You know, if I were to die right now in a fiery explosion due to the carelessness of a friend, well, that would be just okay.

Man-Bat: Yeah, uhh, we’re with the pet hospital down the street and I understand that you have a dying animal on the premises.

Clayface: This isn’t me millionth dollar, this is an ordinary dollar that’s been crumpled up, torn slightly, soaked in the lagoon and kissed with Coral Blue #2 semi-gloss lipstick!

Bane: I was a wimp before Anchor Arms. Now, I’m a jerk and everybody loves me! So order now, wimp!

Hey Rouge, I kinda really want to thank you!!! I had a big art block the last weeks, was tired and bored of drawing my characters. Bit you did manage to inspire me to create new things again through you'reblog, so I made this OC.

Cringe;
Cringe is a (kind of) dog character, who was born with a condition, which makes everything she touches full with colour. That’s exactly why no one wants to hire her for a real job and she mostly has to stay on the streets. Still, even without money she’s really enthusiastic, sarcastic and is known to be a trouble maker. But in bad times she can be a really and reliable person. She also always wants to protect her friends and sets them about everything.

(I LOVE you’re blog btw and you’re art work)

art by nin-j-a-a

  • response:

my god! why did you name her that? I can’t XD

it’s ok tho, she’s cool looking ^^

Everything Has Changed (Part Four)

Summary: In which everything changes when you discover Bucky’s true feelings for you in a very unconventional manner.

Pairing: Bucky x Reader

Word Count: 2,707

Part Three

Originally posted by bucky-plums-barnes

Deciding to join the Avengers was no easy task. Before informing Fury of your final choice, you had to carefully weigh the pros and cons. When you did, it was obvious that there were more bad outcomes than good if you chose to work alongside Earth’s mightiest heroes. There were missions whose varying lengths were as unpredictable as when you’d be told about their existence. There was the never-ending list of injuries that would leave lasting negative effects on your body. Then there was the fact that you’d become a public figure, which would give the media the incorrect assumption that they could magnify and dissect all of your actions.

It all seemed like too much, but it wasn’t enough to scare you away. You wanted the job. You wanted to be an Avenger.

At least that’s what you thought.

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Image: Courtesy of The Family of Judith Jones/Knopf

Judith Jones may not have been a household name, but without her, some of the world’s most famous books may never have been published.

In 1950, Jones was working as an editorial assistant at Doubleday Publishing when she stumbled upon a book in the discard pile that she couldn’t put down. She was struck by the face on the cover: Anne Frank.

“I read all afternoon with the tears coming down my face,” Jones told NPR in 1998. “When my boss got back, it was evening by then. He said, ‘What are you doing still here?’ And I said, 'We have to have this book!’ And he said, 'What? That book by that kid?’”

The book by that kid became The Diary of Anne Frank. It had already been released in German and Dutch, but Jones convinced her bosses to publish it in the United States, vastly expanding its readership. It went on to sell more than 30 million copies worldwide in more than 60 languages.

Jones died Wednesday at her home in Vermont. She was 93.

Legendary Editor Judith Jones Dies At 93

They take a shortcut through a kind of run down neighborhood, meaning that the streets are narrow and the roads are all bumpy. It’s one broken segment of pavement after another. The driver apologizes but says the route is ten minutes shorter and traffic-free, despite the conditions. Harry tells him not to worry about it.

“S’alright, mate.”

Y/N first worries briefly, if it is alright because from where Fionn’s got his arm around Y/N’s waist he digs his fingers into her skin through her clothing and it triggers something carnal inside of her. Her thoughts drift to ones that verge inappropriate, nearly have her cheeks heating. It would all be fine if she wasn’t intimately in Fionn’s lap and his grip wasn’t verging possessive.

And then YN worries, again, because she realizes these thoughts triggered by Fionn’s tight grip are mutual. There is an undoubtedly existent bulge budging against Y/N’s bum from Fionn pants.

She swallows and looks at Harry, instinctively, almost, and because she’s a bit overwhelmed, frozen because she doesn’t know how to proceed with this information.

or, Y/N’s a film student working on the set of Dunkirk and Harry’s her sugar daddy who likes to watch her have sex with Fionn.

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