stereo viewer

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1855 John Stull Stereo Viewer Double Dag Daguerreotype Quarter Plate

A stereoscope is a device for viewing a stereoscopic pair of separate images, depicting left-eye and right-eye views of the same scene, as a single three-dimensional image.

Two separate images are printed side-by-side. When viewed without a stereoscopic viewer the user is required to force his eyes either to cross, or to diverge, so that the two images appear to be three. Then as each eye sees a different image, the effect of depth is achieved in the central image of the three.

Embossed United States of America, Patented by John Stull Feb. 27, 1855. Orders furnished to any part of the United States or in Europe by the patentee S.W. Corner 6th 8 Chestnut St. Philadelphia, PA, green cover with gold embossing, Item is complete and comes with a rare stereo dag of a beautiful young girl in period clothes

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Antique-1855-John-Stull-Stereo-Viewer-Double-Dag-Daguerreotype-Quarter-Plate-/201112548241?pt=Art_Photo_Images&hash=item2ed33df391

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stereoscope

Latin American Architecture Since 1945 | MoMA

The intent of the exhibition Latin American Architecture Since 1945, which explored contemporary architecture in Latin America, was not only to expose the American public to the work of the region’s leading architects, but also to demonstrate the advanced modernity of its cities, “which we ourselves still only anticipate,” as curator Arthur Drexler wrote in the preface to the exhibition catalogue. The 1955 exhibition brought together photographs, photomurals, and special stereo viewers depicting 49 buildings—including complex university developments, public housing projects, stadiums, hotels, industrial buildings, churches, private residences, and a nightclub—that together captured the Latin American building boom, foregrounding famous architects such as Brazil’s Oscar Niemeyer and Venuzuela’s Carlos Rául Villanueva. It was organized by the museum’s International Program, which was founded in 1952 to circulate exhibitions to museums around the world. See images of the installation, great views of the scene at the opening reception, and more at mo.ma/52exhibitions.

(via Latin American Architecture Since 1945 | MoMA)