stephen galloway

Lupita Nyong’o

“What was so extraordinary about Patsey was that she was filled with so much light despite the darkness. [Writer] Khalil Gibran says, ‘The deeper sorrow carves itself into your being, the more joy you can contain.’ That was my experience of working on 12 Years a Slave.”

– from The Hollywood Reporter Roundtable with Six Actresses by Stephen Galloway and Matthew Belloni

(Photograph by Miller Mobley for The Hollywood Reporter. Thank you, Mr. Mobley and Classiq.)

For centuries now, people have come to this country from every corner of the world to share in the blessing of religious freedom. Our Constitution promises that they may worship in their own way, without fear of penalty or danger, and that in itself is a momentous offering. Yet our Constitution makes a commitment still more remarkable— that however those individuals worship, they will countas full and equal American citizens. A Christian, a Jew, a Muslim (and so forth)—each stands in the same relationship with her country, with her state and local communities, and with every level and body of government. So that when each person performs the duties or seeks the benefits of citizenship, she does so not as an adherent to one or another religion, but simply as an American.

I respectfully dissent from the Court’s opinion because I think the Town of Greece’s prayer practices violate that norm of religious equality—the breathtakingly generous constitutional idea that our public institutions belong no less to the Buddhist or Hindu than to the Methodist or Episcopalian. I do not contend that principle translates here into a bright separationist line. To the contrary, I agree with the Court’s decision in Marsh v. Chambers, 463 U. S. 783 (1983), upholding the Nebraska Legislature’s tradition of beginning each session with a chaplain’s prayer. And I believe that pluralism and inclusion in a town hall can satisfy the constitutional requirement of neutrality; such a forum need not become a religion-free zone. But still, the Town of Greece should lose this case. The practice at issue here differs from the one sustained in Marsh because Greece’s town meetings involve participation by ordinary citizens, and the invocations given—directly to those citizens—were predominantly sectarian in content. Still more, Greece’s Board did nothing to recognize religious diversity: In arranging for clergy members to open each meeting, the Town never sought (except briefly when this suit was filed) to involve, accommodate, or in any way reach out to adherents of non-Christian religions. So month in and month out for over a decade, prayers steeped in only one faith, addressed toward members of the public, commenced meetings to discuss local affairs and distribute government benefits. In my view, that practice does not square with the First Amendment’s promise that every citizen, irrespective of her religion, owns an equal share in her government.
Tuesday New Release Day

Out this week: All the Rage by A.L. KennedyThe Confabulist by Stephen GallowayFallout by Sadie JonesThe Girl Who Saved the King of Sweden by Jonas JonassonWith My Dog Eyes by Hilda HilstRuby by Cynthia Bond; and The Informed Air by Muriel Spark. For more on these and other new titles, check out ourGreat 2014 Book Preview.

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Actresses Roundtable - The Hollywood Reporter

Octavia Spencer (Fruitvale Station), Emma Thompson (Saving Mr. Banks), Julia Roberts (August: Osage County), Oprah Winfrey (The Butler), Lupita Nyong'o (12 Years a Slave), and Amy Adams (American Hustle) join THR executive editor Matt Belloni and executive editor of features Stephen Galloway for a candid conversation about their awards-worthy movies.

CAN YOU IMAGINE SITTING AT THIS TABLE? I am struggling to watch the entire video purely because I am overwhelmed with this odd sense of awe and respect, mixed with pure unmerited jealousy. 

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Actresses Roundtable Full Interview
Octavia Spencer (Fruitvale Station), Emma Thompson (Saving Mr. Banks), Julia Roberts (August: Osage County), Oprah Winfrey (Lee Daniels’ The Butler), Lupita Nyong'o (12 Years a Slave), and Amy Adams (American Hustle) join THR executive editor Matt Belloni and executive editor of features Stephen Galloway for a candid conversation about their awards-worthy movies.

2014 is the year of kick ass ladies in the film industry. The six actresses sit down in this interview about acting and talk everything about women in the film industry, including representation, sanity and giving tremendous advice on acting. It’s funny, encouraging and touching and I highly recommend watching all of this.