10

GS:I find in general people have very little understanding of who they are. One has to turn a blind eye to so much of oneself in order to get through life. // WC:And you see it as your responsibility to bring all that out into the open? // GS:Certainly, the good as well as the bad!

                                                                     The Crown, Episode 9

Stephen Dillane said: “It is strange that this is the last time we’ll work together as Karl and Elise. It’s been nothing but a pleasure to work with Clemence, who is both a lovely woman and a beautiful actress. I expect that Emilia and the team at Kudos have a suitably devastating finale up their sleeve.”

More details from Sky

“Sky Atlantic viewers can also look forward to The Tunnel: Vengeance; a third and final instalment of the much-loved crime thriller with Clémence Poésy and the International Emmy award-winning Stephen Dillane.


Following a critically acclaimed second series, the emotionally charged finale brings together the adored and unlikely Anglo-French duo Karl Roebuck (Dillane) and Elise Wassermann (Poésy) for their last outing. Another new and original story, this six part final instalment is penned by lead writer Emilia Di Girolamo (Law & Order: UK).


With Brexit a real possibility, The Tunnel: Vengeance is set in Europe amidst hysteria around a refugee crisis, the increasing threat and horror of terrorism and with far-right groups growing in power.
In this series we follow detectives Karl and Elise as they are faced with toxic and terrifying duo whose hideous crimes see them take ever more dark and desperate measures to provoke the police into collaborating on their desperate endgame. Against this, is the backdrop of Karl’s fractured family life and a miscarriage of justice from Elise’s past that shakes her to her core.”

9

One of his ex-slaves, Isaac, emphasized his erect posture. “Mr Jefferson was a tall, straight-bodied man as ever you see,” he recalled. “Nary a man in this town walked so straight.” Bacon agreed that Jefferson was “straight as a gun barrell.” But others, mostly enemies, described him as loosely jointed and seemingly collapsible, all wrists, elbows, and ankles. The discrepancy might have been a function of different postures. On his feet he was square-shouldered and formal. He bowed to everyone he met and tended to stand with his arms folded across his chest, defining his own private space and warding off intruders. When seated, however, he seemed to melt into the upholstery with a kind of contorted grace, one hip high, the other low, shoulders slouched and uneven, his torso folded in several places, part jackknife and part accordion.

American Sphinx: The Character of Thomas Jefferson, Joseph J. Ellis