stepfather

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I’d like to meet her [Carrie] before we work together… They worked out that we’d meet for dinner. You know, she was 19 years old at the time. I was a worldly 24. So I was thinking, “Oh my God, it’ll be like working with a high school kid.” But I was just bowled over. I mean she was just so instantly ingratiating and funny and outspoken. She had a way of just being so brutally candid. I’d just met her but it was like talking to a person you’d known for 10 years. She was telling me stuff about her stepfather, about her mom, about Eddie Fisher — it was just harrowing in its detail. I kept thinking, “Should I know this?” I mean, I wouldn’t have shared that with somebody that I had trusted for years and years and years. But she was the opposite. She just sucked you into her world.

mockingjaylivesnow  asked:

Hiya! So I just finished Lord of Shadows and my heart is swayed with the feels. Anyways, I don't know if this is too early to ask this but oh well, can we have hope that the Queen of Air and Darkness will soothe our broken hearts? Or is this just out of the frying pan and into the fryer?

NO SPECIFICS  BUT YOU CAN SKIP IF AVOIDING EVEN THEMATIC SPOILERS!

I would say there are aspects that are out of the frying pan into the fire, because if the danger to the characters was over there would be no third book — their adventures and experiences would be done. And in a lot of ways, TWP is almost a continuation of TDA: while Emma and Jules cease to be the main narrators, we move forward with a lot of the same characters from TDA — and that does include some of the same sources of evil and problems. So don’t look to those all to be solved forever.

Emotionally, I think Queen of Air and Darkness will not, though I can understand why one might worry, be an unremitting tragedyfest! Even though there are bitter losses sustained in Lord of Shadows, part of living is the process of making meaning out of death. Though the deaths in LoS were planned for a long long time, I will say that during the writing of LoS I lost someone very very close to me. My stepfather, on whom Luke was based, died suddenly.* So for me this is a very personal story as while I was writing it I was experiencing what it means to have a huge hole of grief punched right through your world.

I’ll talk more about this later, when everyone’s read the book, but for me the third book is in a big part about how grief changes people in ways that are sad, transforming, deepening, even positive; how death doesn’t have to be a pointless waste — how you can honor someone’s memory in a way that changes the world. In QuaD are funny parts, and there are happy romantic parts and friendship fuzzies and squee parts, because life is a mosaic of feelings and because loss doesn’t mean you’ll never laugh again, and you may value those good moments even more than you would have before. As the book’s dedication says, Your wounds are the place the Light enters you.

* The book is dedicated to him.