statue of liberty ferry

New York City Gothic

You climb the stairs to your walkup. You turn five times. You ascend three short flights. You look at the wall. You are only on the second floor. You look up and grow dizzy as you try to count how many floors remain above you. There are far too many. You cannot see the uppermost floor. You are no longer sure what it is.

“Can you tell me the way to Green Witch Village?”, the tourist asks you. The blood drains from your face as you correct them: “It’s pronounced ‘grennitch’.” She must not be invoked. Out of towners will never understand.

It is 4:30 AM and you’re not home yet. You stand on the train platform, avoiding eye contact. There is an unholy screech from down the tunnel. The train that enters is rusting, ancient, pulling flatbeds loaded with tools. Just as you assume it’s merely a repair truck, you notice a dark car between two flatbeds. It is full of hunched, hooded figures. You continue avoiding eye contact. The musician playing the steel drums on the other end of the platform begins playing a song you haven’t heard since childhood, but slowly and in the wrong key. You begin to feel lightheaded.

You could have sworn your train just passed -17th Street.

Every cab slows down for you, and you can feel the gaze of the drivers locking on you, but they do not stop. They cannot stop, as if compelled by some greater force.

A man enters your subway car and apologizes for the interruption. You do not have any cash, and you reach for your MP3 player to try to drown out your own feelings of guilt. Just before you turn up your music, you hear him say that his apartment was devoured by the void.

You didn’t want to cross through Times Square, but you have to get to Port Authority. A man in an Elmo costume tries to get your attention as you hurry across the plaza. As the light changes, you hear him scream your name. His voice is oddly familiar.

You look up at the Statue of Liberty out of habit from your seat on the ferry. You realize she is weeping. Gallons of tears stream over her copper cheeks, her firm mouth gasping, her sobs mixed with the sound of her metal scaffolding grinding and breaking. You look at the other passengers. They do not notice or care.

You open the door to your apartment. You find a Starbucks instead.

New York City Gothic

meganphntmgrl:

You climb the stairs to your walkup. You turn five times. You ascend three short flights. You look at the wall. You are only on the second floor. You look up and grow dizzy as you try to count how many floors remain above you. There are far too many. You cannot see the uppermost floor. You are no longer sure what it is.

“Can you tell me the way to Green Witch Village?”, the tourist asks you. The blood drains from your face as you correct them: “It’s pronounced ‘grennitch’.” She must not be invoked. Out of towners will never understand.

It is 4:30 AM and you’re not home yet. You stand on the train platform, avoiding eye contact. There is an unholy screech from down the tunnel. The train that enters is rusting, ancient, pulling flatbeds loaded with tools. Just as you assume it’s merely a repair truck, you notice a dark car between two flatbeds. It is full of hunched, hooded figures. You continue avoiding eye contact. The musician playing the steel drums on the other end of the platform begins playing a song you haven’t heard since childhood, but slowly and in the wrong key. You begin to feel lightheaded.

You could have sworn your train just passed -17th Street.

Every cab slows down for you, and you can feel the gaze of the drivers locking on you, but they do not stop. They cannot stop, as if compelled by some greater force.

A man enters your subway car and apologizes for the interruption. You do not have any cash, and you reach for your MP3 player to try to drown out your own feelings of guilt. Just before you turn up your music, you hear him say that his apartment was devoured by the void.

You didn’t want to cross through Times Square, but you have to get to Port Authority. A man in an Elmo costume tries to get your attention as you hurry across the plaza. As the light changes, you hear him scream your name. His voice is oddly familiar.

You look up at the Statue of Liberty out of habit from your seat on the ferry. You realize she is weeping. Gallons of tears stream over her copper cheeks, her firm mouth gasping, her sobs mixed with the sound of her metal scaffolding grinding and breaking. You look at the other passengers. They do not notice or care.

You open the door to your apartment. You find a Starbucks instead.

3

Took the day off and went out around the city. I got on the ferry to see the Statue of Liberty but it was closed so the boat just went by it 🙄 Lmfao 22 years old and living in NYC but i’ve never been to the statue of liberty. But on the bright side, I look good 😜

anonymous asked:

Hi, I was wondering if you had any advice for an upcoming trip to NYC I'm planning. Background: I'm from Europe, taking my partner to a different part of the US but surprising them on their birthday with a night in NYC before we fly home. I want to take them to see a musical but aside from that I'm wondering what you'd recommend for a very poor very lovestruck student who has little time and even less money and just wants to snuggle a cutie in NYC. I hope I'm okay to ask this! Have a good day :)

yes yes yes yes yes yes

if you’re in NYC and looking to be cute with a cutie, New York’s hottest FREE SHIT TO DO is:

  • The Metropolitan Museum of Art (suggested admission, so like. you could pay $1), if either of you is an art fan, I highly recommend the Met. 
  • The Museum of Natural History, if either of you is a huge nature/science nerd (suggested admission)
  • The Staten Island Ferry - FREEEEEEEEEEE okay listen, PLEASE take them to the Ferry. You don’t have to buy tickets or anything, you literally just show up (the ferry leaves every 20 minutes or so) and walk on the boat and it takes you to Staten Island, which means you pass the Statue of Liberty and stuff. Then, you board the ferry again on Staten Island and it takes you right back to the City. All in all, it takes about an hour and is totally free!!! You can see the trip schedule here, I recommend going at like 7 or 8pm for the sunset but it’s amazing any time. You could go after you see a show, the skyline would look beautiful, and the ferry station is right in front of the subway so you don’t have to worry about wandering around at night. 
  • PARKS SO MANY BEAUTIFUL PARKS - depending on where you are in the city, you could do a picnic in a park or just go there and sit or listen to live music (there is always music playing somewhere in a nyc park) My personal fav is Washington Square, and if you’re planning on being in the theatre district for a show that evening, you could hit Washington Sq first. You can sit and put your feet in the giant fountain, it’s really nice, esp if it’s hot outside. Central Park is obv an option as well, but it’s huge so try to plan where you’re going. 
  • The High Line - I have not actually been to the high line yet, as it’s relatively new but I hear great things. It’s an old railway line that was going to be torn down but the city turned it into what is basically a park overlooking the city. There are a lot of events and stuff going on up there, most of which are free. If you go at night, some nights they do stargazing!
  • CHEAP PIZZA??? - if you’re in the area (which, you will be if you end up near washington sq) go to 2 Bros Pizza, $1 a slice. Is it the absolute best new york pizza you can buy? No. Is it only one fucking dollar meaning you could, if your heart desired, eat a whole pizza for $8? YES. (Note: according to their website they have multiple locations. I’ve only been to the St. Mark’s location, so idk if the others also do $1 slices, but you should go to the St. Mark’s one anyway because that whole area is p. cool)
  • A note on doing broadway - if you have the time, try going to a TKTS booth, where you stand in line and get show tickets for half price. They have multiple locations, 2 of which are in manhattan. Idk where you’re staying but I’m guessing Times Square will be the easiest for you to get to. Go early and stand in line (it’s usually not too bad tbh) and you can get cheap tickets w/ pretty good seats for most any show you wanna see. I recommend getting the TKTS app, it will tell you what’s on sale that day and what the discount amount is!

I don’t wanna overload you, since it sounds like you have at most 2 days but those are some of my favorite free or cheap things to do in the city. Lemme know how it goes!

Dear Photograph,
We took the ferry to see the Statue of Liberty and missed visiting the twin towers. The next day (Note the timestamp on the original photo) will be forever etched in our hearts, as we drove further and further away, watching the skys unfold with so much heartache. Freedom… that word has never meant so much to us.
Love to the families, -Stephanie

STAB ME.

GUEST: Hello. We want the sightseeing boat. The Staten Island ferry to the Statue of Liberty.
CONCIERGE: Ok. Those are 3 different things. I just want to make sure I give you the right directions. Do you want to go TO the statue of liberty?
GUEST: We want the Staten Island ferry…
CONCIERGE: Ok. Great.
GUEST: That we take from near here in midtown?
CONCIERGE: Ok. We have 3 different boats you’re talking about. You can go TO the Statue of Liberty with the Parks Department. This one may have long lines and security and it departs from Battery Park. For around $30 there are sightseeing cruises that will go near the Statue of Liberty. These depart from midtown. The third option is the Staten Island Ferry which is a free commuter boat that goes back and forth from here to Staten Island, which is NOT where the Statue is. You’ll still get nice views with the Staten Island Ferry though.
GUEST: Right. Staten Island Ferry. Where will that go to?
CONCIERGE: Staten Island. It’s just another borough. Primarily residential, not much to see there.
GUEST: But we want to go to the Statue of Liberty.
CONCIERGE: That was literally the first thing I asked if you wanted to do.
GUEST: Oh. Sorry. How can we take the Staten Island Ferry to the Statue of Liberty?