star forming regions

Stars and Dust in Corona Australis: Cosmic dust clouds and young, energetic stars inhabit this telescopic vista, less than 500 light-years away toward the northern boundary of Corona Australis, the Southern Crown. The dust clouds effectively block light from more distant background stars in the Milky Way. But the striking complex of reflection nebulae cataloged as NGC 6726, 6727, and IC 4812 produce a characteristic blue color as light from the regions young hot stars is reflected by the cosmic dust. The dust also obscures from view stars still in the process of formation. At the left, smaller yellowish nebula NGC 6729 bends around young variable star R Coronae Australis. Just below it, glowing arcs and loops shocked by outflows from embedded newborn stars are identified as Herbig-Haro objects. On the sky this field of view spans about 1 degree. That corresponds to almost 9 light-years at the estimated distance of the nearby star forming region. via NASA

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30 Doradus, located in the heart of the Tarantula nebula, is the brightest star-forming region in our galactic neighborhood. The nebula resides 170,000 light-years away in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Links to very large images in comments.

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8

Mostly Mute Monday: The Galactic Plane

Once thought to be its own, unique class of object, the Milky Way is today known to be simply a collection of hundreds of billions of stars, viewed from our vantage point within the galactic plane.

In the early 1600s, Galileo became the first to resolve much of the Milky Way into individual stars, not yet knowing that it was also full of dust, nebulae, and star-forming regions as well. Thanks to amazing projects such as ESO’s Gigagalaxy Zoom, we can view the entire galactic plane at once, at resolutions unimaginable centuries ago.

The Sunflower Galaxy, Messier 63 sports a bright yellowish core in this sharp composite image from space- and ground-based telescopes. Its sweeping blue spiral arms are streaked with cosmic dust lanes and dotted with pink star forming regions.

A bright spiral galaxy of the northern sky, M63 is about 25 million light-years distant in the loyal constellation Canes Venatici. A dominant member of a known galaxy group, M63 has faint, extended features that are likely star streams from tidally disrupted satellite galaxies. M63 shines across the electromagnetic spectrum and is thought to have undergone bursts of intense star formation.

Image Credit & Copyright: Data - Hubble Legacy Archive, Subaru Telescope (NAOJ), Don Goldman
Processing - Robert Gendler, Roberto Colombari, Don Goldman

The beautiful Trifid Nebula, also known as Messier 20, lies about 5,000 light-years away, a colorful cosmic sky. It shares this field with open star cluster Messier 21 (top left). 

The Trifid nebula is about 40 light-years across and a mere 300,000 years old. That makes it one of the youngest star forming regions in our sky. M20 and M21 are easy to find with even a small telescope in the nebula rich constellation Sagittarius. In fact, this well-composed scene is a composite from two different telescopes.

Image Credit & Copyright: Martin Pugh

10

Closest Supernova In Years Brings Cosmic Fireworks To Earth’s Skies

“Cosmic fireworks like these don’t truly happen at random; they are clustered in time and space around the most massive, intense star-forming regions of all. You can’t have a bigger star-forming region than one that includes the entire galaxy, and the sweeping, grand, irregular arms of the Fireworks galaxy are as good as they come. Based on what we see, we expect this elevated rate to continue for more than a million years.”

Every once in a while, a new light appears somewhere in the night sky: the result of a massive star reaching the end of its life. From many millions of light years away, the brilliance of a supernova shines across the cosmos. Just a few days ago, a new light was discovered in a galaxy only 22 million light years away, making it the closest supernova discovered in three years. The galaxy housing it is a hotbed of supernova formation, having been home to ten such explosions in the past 100 years: more than we’ve found in any other galaxy. The reason? This entire galaxy, despite having only half the stars of the Milky Way, is a giant star-forming region. Starburst galaxies like this are the best place to look for cataclysmic events like this, and NGC 6946 is maybe the best example of all.

Come see the night sky’s newest, closest supernova, and learn how to see it for yourself!

Messier 63: The Sunflower Galaxy 

 A bright spiral galaxy of the northern sky, Messier 63 is about 25 million light-years distant in the loyal constellation Canes Venatici. Also cataloged as NGC 5055, the majestic island universe is nearly 100,000 light-years across. That’s about the size of our own Milky Way Galaxy.

Known by the popular moniker, The Sunflower Galaxy, M63 sports a bright yellowish core in this sharp composite image from space- and ground-based telescopes. Its sweeping blue spiral arms are streaked with cosmic dust lanes and dotted with pink star forming regions. A dominant member of a known galaxy group, M63 has faint, extended features that are likely star streams from tidally disrupted satellite galaxies. M63 shines across the electromagnetic spectrum and is thought to have undergone bursts of intense star formation. 

Credit: Data - Hubble Legacy Archive, Subaru Telescope (NAOJ), Don Goldman, Processing - Robert Gendler, Roberto Colombari, Don Goldman

This shot from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows a maelstrom of glowing gas and dark dust within one of the Milky Way’s satellite galaxies, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). This stormy scene shows a stellar nursery known as N159, an HII region over 150 light-years across. N159 contains many hot young stars. 

The Lagoon Nebula, often noted as Messier 8, is a giant interstellar cloud located between 4,000 and 6,000 light years from Earth. It is primarily composed on Hydrogen gas that is ionised by a nearby star called Herschel 36. It is an emission Nebula, which means it contains a star-forming region. There’s not really much else to know besides it’s amazing appearance. ✨

POKEMON STARS - FIRST EVER DLC Pack 1!

Pokémon Stars Black and Pokémon Stars White, may be the best titles for the new Pokemon Games on the Nintendo Switch. But something more incredible may come our way, a POKEMON Stars DLC Pack


POKEMON STARS will feature the Alola region but little game-hints have given us a bigger picture and Nintendo Switch’s latest model: Game + DLC pack completes it.


Travel from ALOLA to KANTO across the Ocean.

Travel from ALOLA to KALOS entering the Cave.

Travel from KALOS to UNOVA - Not Yet Known?



Follow @megapokemonxy for more POKEMON STARS News, Leaks, & Spoilers!

Star Cluster R136 Bursts Out : In the center of star-forming region 30 Doradus lies a huge cluster containing some of the largest, hottest, and most massive stars known. These stars, known collectively as star cluster R136, were captured in the featured image in visible light by the Wide Field Camera 3 in 2009 peering through the Hubble Space Telescope. Gas and dust clouds in 30 Doradus, also known as the Tarantula Nebula, have been sculpted into elongated shapes by powerful winds and ultraviolet radiation from these hot cluster stars. The 30 Doradus Nebula lies within a neighboring galaxy known as the Large Magellanic Cloud and is located a mere 170,000 light-years away. via NASA

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