stanley tretick

 "Kennedy disliked photos that showed any public display of affection. ‘Once in New York City he was greeted at the airport by Jack, who kissed him on arrival, but we missed the photo because of a lot of maneuvering on Kennedy’s part. He was supposed to get off the front of the plane but instead he ran out the back where he met Jackie and kissed her quickly. We all made a mad dash and started screaming, 'Kiss her again, Senator.’ 'C'mon, Mrs. Kennedy. Hug him.’ 'Senator, we need a kiss!’ JFK looked at us and smiled. 'You’re sure an affectionate group of photographers.’“ 

"Even after his inaugural address Kennedy did not kiss his wife, which is why she later told Stanley she loved the photograph he had taken of the them in a convertible returning from Blair House to the White House. The picture shows the President reaching over to tenderly brush hair out of her face. 'It’s my favorite picture of the two of us,’ she said, 'because it shows such great affection.’”

“Stanley recollected that as a candidate 'Kennedy will not pose for any picture which he thinks smacks of corn. As his good friend Joe Alsop says, 'Two things make him nervous–nuns and silly hats.’”


Capturing Camelot: Stanley Tretick’s Iconic Images of the Kennedys

President Kennedy and the First Lady escorted President Habib Bourguiba of Tunisia to Blair House, May 3, 1961.  On the ride back to the White House the President reached over and tenderly brushed his wife’s hair out of her eyes.  She later told photographer Stanley Tretick, “It’s my favorite picture of the two of us, because it shows such great affection."  This photo is very rare as Kennedy disliked photos that showed any public display of affection.

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A month before his assassination in Dallas, John F. Kennedy, who had started to prepare the 1964 presidential campaign, invited the photographer Stanley Tretick to the White House for a series of photographs with his son John Jr., taking advantage of Jackie’s absence, who protected her children from the media. John’s pranks earned him the nickname ‘trickster’ at the White House.

Kitty Kelley, journalist Soledad O’Brien, and Marian Wright Edelman discuss Stanley Tretick’s never-before-published photos of the March on Washington.

Join us on Thursday, September 12, at 7 p.m.

On August 28, 1963, despite searing heat, over 250,000 people from all corners of the country marched on our nation’s capital. In the shadow of the Washington Monument, all the marchers shared the same dream: equality for the nearly 20 million African Americans living in the United States.

This moment in time is recorded by Stanley Tretick’s never-before-published photos of that day, now released in a new book accompanied by author Kitty Kelley’s poignant text. Joining Kelley on stage will be journalist Soledad O’Brien and Marian Wright Edelman, President of the Children’s Defense Fund and March on Washington participant.

The program will include photos projected on screen and vocal performances by Garrick Jordan. A book signing will follow the program. Presented in partnership with the Children’s Defense Fund.  

Watch live online at www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives.

Programming for the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington is made possible by partnership with the Foundation for the National Archives and the generous support of Texas Instruments.

Join us on tonight, September 12, at 7 p.m. as Kitty Kelley, Soledad O'Brien, and Marian Wright Edelman discuss previously unpublished photos of the March on Washington.

On August 28, 1963, despite searing heat, over 250,000 people from all corners of the country marched on our nation’s capital. In the shadow of the Washington Monument, all the marchers shared the same dream: equality for the nearly 20 million African Americans living in the United States.

Stanley Tretick’s never-before-published photos of that day have now released in a new book with author Kitty Kelley’s poignant text. Joining Kelley on stage will be journalist Soledad O’Brien and Marian Wright Edelman, President of the Children’s Defense Fund and March on Washington participant.

The program will include photos projected on screen and vocal performances by Garrick Jordan. A book signing will follow the program. Presented in partnership with the Children’s Defense Fund.

Watch live online at www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives.

Programming for the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington is made possible by partnership with the Foundation for the National Archives and the generous support of Texas Instruments.

Image by Stanley Tretick, courtesy of Kitty Kelley.