standard practice

6

What can a female character do without being criticized mercilessly? [insp.]

anonymous asked:

did you seriously just say we should let pandas go extinct to save other animals or am i misinterpreting because that is a very questionable judgement

ALRIGHT MY FRIEND I have received about six messages in this vein since yesterday, but I worked for thirteen hours today and I have no time for this nonsense. Short answer: YES. 

I’m gonna summarize some salient points on why pandas are awful from a conservation standpoint:

  • PANDAS LITERALLY CANNOT MATE IN CAPTIVITY. IT’S UNBELIEVABLE
  • Artificial insemination and hand-rearing of cubs are basically standard practice, and still they usually die. At what point is it reasonable to give up because I think we hit it DECADES AGO
  • In 35 years, only 90 cubs have been born in captivity outside of China
  • Wild panda numbers have increased a bare (bear?) 200 individuals in 10 years, despite literal billions of dollars being poured into conservation
  • NO OTHER AREA OF ANIMAL CONSERVATION EVEN COMES CLOSE TO THE MONEY BEING POURED INTO PANDAS. NONE
  • And yet we’ve managed to literally rebuild populations of black-footed ferrets, oryx, and California condors with exponentially less money
  • Despite all of this, only 10 pandas have been released since the 80s, and all but two died
  • I bet you wouldn’t have guessed that it’s because their habitat is destroyed and fragmentary and barely protected!!!!!! 
  • The only good thing about panda conservation is that protecting their range is also protecting tons of other species. Which would be great, if more of their range was being protected effectively.
  • There is way more money in keeping captive pandas captive than in releasing them!! surprise!!!!!!
  • Zoos pay a lot of money to get pandas on loan because people just LOVE looking at pandas and they can’t afford to house and care for their other animals without people coming to visit! Or do any kind of conservation whatsoever!! Panda-economics! (this is kind of a pro as opposed to a con but its the kind of pro that makes me feel like I need a shower)
  • Pandas are endangered and sort of have a role in spreading bamboo seeds around, so they get billions of dollars. Every shark ever is MORE endangered, and without them the entire ocean ecosystem would collapse, but that’s fine they don’t need money (I’m not bitter) ((I am bitter))

I’m gonna be frank with you. We are in the middle of a mass extinction event, caused by us. Not to be a downer (jk, I’m gonna) but we’re already driving so many species to extinction that we cannot afford to save them all with the money and interest that is in conservation right now. 

Instead, we have to do some kind of awful extinction triage and assess which animals will do the most good to work to conserve - and getting into keystone species, ecosystem engineers, and other truly integral species is a whole other can of worms I’m not gonna touch on - but there are animals that are “more important” in a certain sense than others, in that they can support or affect a much wider range of other species than another

People only care about big, cute, fluffy animals - a common lament heard from conservationists, but it’s so true. There are thousands, if not millions of species that don’t fit this mold that conservation work would benefit eons more than pandas. It’s like fixing a pretty, stained-glass window in a house whose foundations are collapsing and thinking you’re helping. 

Pandas have always been the face of conservation, and they continue to be one of the biggest and most expensive ongoing failures. 


[Sources/ stuff to read to make sense of my incoherent response!]

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anonymous asked:

If muscle mass has only a small impact on fight abilities, what's with the prevalence of weight classes? And why are martial arts and boxing champions generally men?

See, you were trying to sneak around it with that start on muscle mass but this is about the idea that women can fight and or fight as well as a man. We get these questions a lot, and the answer is always the same. However, the question itself always displays the asker’s ignorance on the subject matter and about combat in general. You aren’t the first to go, “but boxing!!!” as if it means something or is a winning point. Usually, “muscles” is a go to standard because that’s what so many have been led to believe makes men superior.

When I get these questions, I can always tell this person who asked has never been to a martial arts competition of any kind. If they had, they would know Women’s Divisions are a standard practice. They would also know that with an exception of major tournaments where there are enough participants to justify it, the girls and the boys spar each other at the ranks below black belt. Sometimes, the boys win. Sometimes, the girls win. The breakdown is by age (adults/kids) and belt rank, not by gender.

I’ll tell you though, none of the boy’s in the black belt division wanted to jump in with the girls. Those girls were vicious. Men’s sparring was much more laid back, and slower. Women’s TKD… yeesh.

Again, in most martial arts tournaments there are no weight classes. The breakdown is by age and rank, with gender as a secondary when there are enough participants to justify multiple divisions. Weight classes are a boxing tradition and other, similar bloodsports which rears it’s head when they have enough participants to justify one. In many Taekwondo tournaments, you can easily end up with a 150 pound black belt sparring one weighing in at 250. And you won’t know what they weigh anyway because there is no “weighing in”.

I’ve explained before why there are weight classes in boxing. The moment you stop and realize that it’s a sport with a purpose to make money, the reasoning behind the weight classes will become fairly clear. (Hint: it’s entertainment and aesthetics.)

That said, the “boxing champions are generally men” crap is, well, crap. They don’t let women box men professionally, or at the collegiate level. It’s hard to make a case for muscle mass when citing professional sports where women are barred from competing. Now, there was a time when there were women boxers who boxed with each other and against men. In the 1800s, it was called bareknuckle boxing. This is the granddaddy version of modern boxing, when it was all back alleys without gloves or handwraps.

That said, women’s boxing is making a comeback at the collegiate level. There’s a National Champion in Women’s Collegiate Boxing walking around somewhere in the US right now. There are multiple female martial arts champions from a variety of disciplines wandering around all over the world. The UFC has opened a division for female fighters. This is like asking why there aren’t female wrestlers (there are) or female quarterbacks (there are). One of the greatest snipers in history is a woman.

You just don’t hear about them or the women who did the hard work pushing back to fight for the categories to be re-added.

That said, comparing the restrictions applied in sports to a person’s “fighting ability” is a mistake. You’re not asking an honest question so much as floundering for a popular misconception. It’s essentially the same as saying, “it’s ridiculous for there to be female fighters in this historical fiction because there were no female warriors”.

1) That assertion is patently false.

2) When one gender is barred from participating by the established rules of a modern sport whose history you don’t understand, you can’t then turn around and ask why most of the champions are men.

History makes a case for a lot of female combatants throughout history, but you’re not going to know they’re there if you don’t go looking for them. Their accomplishments tend to get wiped out.

-Michi

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humans are terrifying, and i wrote a story about it

humans look absurdly like predators to the first species we meet. so much so that the standard practice becomes to cover ourselves almost head to toe to avoid terrifying every diplomat we come across. our eyes remain uncovered, but pretty much everything else stays hidden. my story follows a scout group, mix of thrak’yans (a photosythesising species) and humans, when they encounter a predator and are forced to flee. Thrak’yans look vaguely humanoid, but are incredibly thin and fragile - they’re essentially sentient trees. they have pale green skin and what look like long, flowing robes but are actually huge stretches of leaf that they can use to gain more energy from the sun. on their planet, Son’uu, their main predators were hunted into extinction long ago (a prerequisite for their civilisation), but they still have instinctive fear of anything with teeth or fur.

———

Jess had been training to work on this research vessel for years - learning the language, studying the culture, and prepping for zero-gravity inter-shuttle trips. There was no-one at the Galactic Port readier than she was to leave Earth that day.

Thrak’yans were a skittish race, to say the least. She’d been briefed on all the protocols; as the only human on the vessel, she was to always wear her coverings, reveal her face only in her quarters, speak softly, and move slowly. Giving humans a reputation as the “intergalactic warrior death species” wouldn’t be entirely inaccurate, considering they were the only known sentient predator species in the contacted universe, but it wouldn’t be helpful to their ambitions to enter the senate as a budding quadrant trading power, either.

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I cannot, will not, bear you. (vent art, sort of)

i love skin care culture. i love the idea of putting effort into maintaining your beauty & working on it to enhance your natural look, & working towards self-acceptance & mindfulness instead of chasing impossible standards. i love practicing sustainable ways to keep up your confidence & comfort via self care rituals that make you feel good about yourself and comfortable in your own skin. i love skin care culture.

Australia's Shame

Aboriginal people of the Stolen Generation were given criminal records for being taken away from their families by the Australian government. Their crime was being “a child in need of care.” They could be as young as two.

It was standard practice in Australia until 1989. Many are alive today who have a criminal record, solely for being born an Aboriginal person.

Carnists: Every single example of undercover footage showing animal cruelty is Fake

Carnists: Um haven’t you seen the Happy Egg adverts?? The chickens are HAPPY. Fuck off, vegans

Radicles being stupid I can understand, but Mr. Gar too!?

anonymous asked:

Sometimes I wonder why the Jedi's healers, doctors and therapists (if they had therapists) didn't just storm a Jedi Council meeting one day and point out the physical and mental injuries and trauma Anakin needs to heal from as well as the psychological impact of going from the life of a slave, to a member of a highly conservative religious organization. I love that in your Librarian AU Jocasta addresses this but I wonder if she got the healers like Vokara Che on her side.

I think the answer to your question is contained within the question itself: the Jedi are a highly conservative religious organization.

I’ve never been a Jedi, obviously, but I do know a thing or 50 about life inside a conservative religious organization. And one of the major parallels I see there is an absolute belief that faith and right practice are enough to ensure mental and spiritual well-being. If you are practicing rightly, you will not be affected by trauma, by negative emotions, by mental illness. If you are affected by those things, you must be doing something wrong.

Yoda’s advice to Anakin in ROTS bears this out. I’m always a bit puzzled when I see people trying to justify Yoda’s advice, because listen: I’ve been on the receiving end of that approach so many times I’ve lost count. It’s not some otherworldly, fictional attitude. Yoda’s approach to pastoral counseling (if you will) is basically standard practice in fundamentalist religious circles.

Everything feels like it’s falling apart so you go to your spiritual leader and all he does is tell you everything you’re doing wrong. You need to let go. You need to trust. You need to have faith and follow the teachings and stop asking questions. Your doubt is probably to blame for all of your problems in the first place. The teachings of the faith tell you everything you need to know. Accept them and rejoice in your suffering.

Of course the Jedi don’t have therapists. That would require admitting that trauma and mental illness exist, that they aren’t things people can simply think or will themselves out of by following the right religious steps. It would mean admitting that so-called negative emotions are normal and valid and can be worked through in a healthy way - and even admitting that sometimes they are a positive thing.

The Jedi Order, as an organization, cannot admit those things without drastically changing many of their core beliefs and principles. Much less can they admit that their own structure and practice might be potentially harmful or even traumatizing to anyone.

The Trump Standard

What did Trump say when confronted with proof that his son jumped at the prospect of meeting with a “Russian government attorney” offering to dish dirt on Hillary Clinton as “part of Russia and its government’s support” for his candidacy?

Trump said: “many people would have held that meeting.” 

The next day, Trump revised “many” to “most,” saying: “I think from a practical standpoint, most people would have taken that meeting. . . . Politics isn’t the nicest business in the world, but it’s very standard.”

It’s true that politics isn’t the nicest business in the world. I’ve been there. Real estate development isn’t the nicest business in the world either, for all I know. But breaking the law and flirting with treason isn’t standard practice in either realm.  

Much ink has been spilled over the last six months documenting Trump’s tin ear when it comes to all matters ethical: His refusal to put his business into a blind trust, as every one of his predecessors in recent memory has done. His refusal to reveal his tax returns, like his predecessors. The never-ending stream of lies that he continues to spew even after they’re proven to be lies (three to five million fraudulent votes, Obama spied on me, fake news, and so on).  

None of this is “very standard” for presidents. It’s the opposite of standard.

I think we’ve been missing the boat by characterizing these as ethical breaches. Ethics assumes some sort of agreed-upon standard against which an ethical breach can be defined and measured.

But Donald Trump doesn’t live in a world that has any standards at all, and he never has. His entire approach to life, to business, and now to the presidency has nothing whatever to do with standards. It’s about winning, at all costs. Whatever it takes.

Winning at all costs is the only thing that’s standard in Trumpworld.

When he was in business and couldn’t repay his creditors, he declared bankruptcy. Again and again. And when his bankers finally wised up and refused to lend him any more money, he found foreign bankers who would oblige.

When he could have chosen to pay his contractors, or others who worked for him, he didn’t. He stiffed them.

Trump has spent most of his life in business being sued or sueing – as if our judicial system was just another standard tool for winning.

To make a name for himself in politics, he suggested Barack Obama wasn’t born in America. Hey, whatever it took.

To win the presidency he told lies about undocumented immigrants and crime, about Arabs cheering as the World Trade Center went down, about  his business smarts. He promised his followers he’d jail Hillary Clinton, drain the Washington swamp, build a wall along the Mexican border, create vast numbers of jobs, repeal the North American Free Trade Act.

He’d lie about anything. He’d promise anything. All was just a means to becoming president. There are no standards. Whatever it took.

“I could stand in the middle of 5th Avenue and shoot somebody and I wouldn’t lose voters,” he said.

Did he collude with Russia to become president? That wouldn’t be standard practice in politics, but it would be consistent with Trump’s standard.

“I said [to Putin] ‘Did you do it?’” Trump reported back on his meeting with Vladimir. “And he said, ‘No, I did not. Absolutely not.’ I then asked him a second time in a totally different way. He said absolutely not.”

And that’s supposed to be the end of it? 

The  U.S. intelligence community has told Trump that Russia interfered on his behalf in the presidential election of 2016, at Putin’s direction. So why does Trump ask Putin if he did it? 

He should be telling Putin what the United States is planning to do in response to what Putin did.

We may never know the exact answer to whether Trump himself colluded with Putin to win the presidency. Or, more likely, his core supporters may never know, because Trump will tell them not to believe whatever Special Counsel Robert Mueller and the intelligence agencies come up with, and to blame the press for reporting fake news. Politics isn’t the nicest business in the world, he might say, but whatever he did was very standard.

A president’s major responsibilities are to protect the United States and the Constitution, and to see that the laws are faithfully executed.

But Trump’s major goal now is to remain in power and to accumulate even more money. Whatever it takes.

Dick Grayson: Martial Arts

So I’m finally getting around to writing this. The first question every single one of you should be asking is what makes me– a random person on the internet– qualified to talk about a fictional character’s expert martial arts abilities. Well, I am

>> A black belt in Northern Eagle Claw Kung Fu
>> A brown belt (2nd kyu /nikyu) in Aikido

I’ve also taken some Southern Shaolin Kung Fu, Taekwondo, and Karate. 

The main styles I’m qualified to talk about are Eagle Claw Kung Fu and Aikido, which mainly comes from my years of practice. I’m not an instructor in any of these disciplines, and I’m only writing this for fun. This post might be helpful to people who role play Dick Grayson or to just develop headcanons in general. Hey, you might just be straight up interested in how this guy fights.

The fact is, comic books aren’t the best portrayal of how martial artists fight. Comic books are very flashy. They like splash pages, dramatic kicks and punches, and they like to have superheroes jump to the ground with cement-shattering landings that would devastate their knee joints. The irony here is that Dick’s core martial art style is canonically Aikido, and Aikido has a grand total of zero kicks. The only punches that this style uses are your standard initial strikes in order to practice the forms. Otherwise, this style is purely defensive. The philosophy of Aikido is basically to disarm your opponent with as little damage to them as possible. In Kung Fu, I was taught how to break people’s arms, rip out the trachea, and damage the ear drums (yay, fun), but in Aikido the idea is that you don’t want to physically harm your opponent more than necessary. Dick knows various martial art styles, so clearly he knows how to execute lethal and flawless kicks and punches too, but for now, let’s focus on Aikido since it’s his core style.

This is actually an awesome style for Dick for many reasons. Aikido is a martial art focused on using your opponent’s energy against them, and it’s a purely defensive style (there are no offensive maneuvers in this style besides your standard initial strike to practice movements). Dick started crime fighting when he was a kid. He couldn’t rely on physical strength to survive, and after growing up to be an adult, he’s still only about 175 pounds which means a majority of the big hitters in DCU can easily physically overpower him. I’m 115 pounds, and I can tell you that I drop guys who are twice my size all the time in Aikido. It doesn’t take much physical effort because this style relies on innate human weaknesses. The idea of Aikido is to learn a system of defensive maneuvers that can be applied to any attack that comes your way.

Someone punching you? No problem. They grabbed both your wrists? Please. Shirt collar? Ha, whatever. Grabbed from behind? Come on. Knife stab? Zzz. Samurai sword? – You mean the one that’s now in my hands?

This is a flexible martial art style, and it works without tiring you. When I took Kung fu, I needed a water break after twenty minutes because the workout was so intense. In Aikido I can go two and a half hours straight and not break a sweat. You rarely have to move more than a few feet to complete a technique, and it’s usually to move into your opponent’s blind spot in order to execute a technique that puts them on the floor. Don’t get me wrong, you can practice Aikido fast and hard and tire yourself out with a good workout– but you don’t have to. If you’re wise about your movements, you can save a lot of energy.

If Dick is as much of an expert in Aikido as comics say, then you can’t put your hand near this guy without ending up on your back in 0.2 seconds flat. You’ll be staring at the ceiling wondering what the hell just happened (been there, done that, trust me).

Dick Grayson can put anyone on the floor in a matter of seconds without throwing a single punch or kick. He basically just needs to stand there and bam, they’re down. So by this point you’re probably wondering how this style works as effectively as it does.

It works by blending your energy into your opponent’s and then using it against them. If someone punches Dick, he can side-step their arm, grab their wrist to yank them forward (i.e. off-balance them), and then twist the wrist back so that his opponent has no choice but to follow wherever he guides them– which in this case will be backwards (lifting their elbow over their shoulder to force them to land on their back).

This entire time, Dick barely has to move to execute it other than the initial side-step. It’s a fluid, eloquent and sophisticated style. The movements you do are so small (a simple twist of the wrist) that anyone watching this fight might go, “what the fuck just happened?”

Now, I am exaggerating a bit, but there is a fundamental truth here. The key is that we’re twisting someone’s wrist in a direction that it’s not supposed to go, forcing the human body to either follow the movement or break the joint. 10/10 times the body will involuntarily follow the movement.

For any of you who want a physical example of how this works in order to better understand it, I’ll try to offer a step-by-step example here. (Explaining things over the Internet is hard, I offer no guarantees.)

  1. Hold your right hand in front of your face with the palm facing you.
  2. Take your left hand and hold it behind your right hand.
  3. Wrap the fingers of your left hand around the thumb joint of your right hand (this is the meaty part of your palm below your thumb).
  4. Make sure the thumb of your left hand is pressing between the knuckles of the pinkie and ring finger of your right hand (or at least keep it in that general area, no worries).
  5. Now press the entire thing down and to the side (there should only be one natural direction to go). If you extend your arm down, you’ll feel it even more. You can also bend your arm toward (and over) your shoulder to further understand the type of control someone would have over you in this position.

(If any of you had trouble following that, I don’t blame you. I still can’t figure out online origami instructions.) 

If you managed this successfully, then you have an idea of why you don’t want someone holding your arm like this. If they start walking you in one direction, you’re going to follow them because it’s an unnatural position.

So that’s one basic wrist movement, and there are dozens of others. Like I said, this is a very flexible style. You can punch Dick Grayson and he can respond over a dozen different ways. One might put you on your back, he could straight up throw you, he can flip you, he can put you on your stomach with your arms behind your back in a painful lock, he can spin you in a fast circle and drop you.

We can see Dick and Tim doing something similar in New Teen Titans Vol 2 #60.

Pretty cool, right? When I spar with people, I tell them to grab me as hard as they can so I can practice with a genuine threat. The guy I was last sparring with was taller than me, weighed more, and was stronger. He was gripping both my wrists tightly (and I have tiny ass wrists), and that didn’t stop me from performing this move because Aikido doesn’t rely on physical strength. Once you move a limb a way it’s not supposed to go, it doesn’t really matter how strong you are; you’re under the control of whoever’s controlling that limb. 

So hopefully that helps explain this style a bit more. It’s my favorite martial art so far, and I recommend it to anyone, especially women. 

As for Dick’s other martial art styles, he knows Jeet-Kune-Do (created by Bruce Lee; it’s a direct style of combat considered ideal for street fighting), Capoeira (an acrobatic style that focuses on movement and evasion) and Eskrima (where Dick’s dual wielding sticks obviously come into play). He’s also been said to practice Muay Thai, Judo, Savate, Karate, Sambo, Ninjitsu, Wing Chun and Shaolin Kung Fu.

Robin: Year One #3

6

i was playing the stick of truth with my friend yesterday and she beat me up until i drew these five randomly specific boys.

Gamble also took wicked pleasure in writing lines that related to Richard Roman’s predilection for being called “Dick.” “The temptation is always to write something that doesn’t get past Standards and Practices,” she admits.

Source: Supernatural: The Official Companion Season 7. Titan Books, 2012: 117.

… And you know what? Point taken. We haven’t seen the full “Look What You Made Me Do” video yet, and one similar image isn’t necessarily enough to reasonably call someone out for appropriation. But this isn’t the only pre-VMAs clean-up Swift’s camp is doing; they’ve also had to deny that the release date for Reputation — November 10, 2017 — was chosen as another slight to Kanye because it falls on the 10th anniversary of his mother Donda’s death. Big Machine Records told E! News, “It is standard practice that releases come out on Fridays and we locked in this release date based on other Universal Music Group releases.


The most compelling evidence that the video and release date aren’t swipes at Bey and Ye, though? The fact that they’re not obvious digs. Taylor is pretty clear when she’s writing or talking about someone in particular. She had a crush on a boy named Drew so "Teardrops On My Guitar” mentions a boy named Drew. Her song about John Mayer is called “Dear John.” People called Taylor a snake, so now she’s wearing and selling snake-shaped rings. If she wanted to use Beyoncé’s imagery, she’d be like, sipping lemonade, and if she wanted to piss of Kanye with her release date, she’d drop an album on his birthday or something. When Taylor is taunting someone, there’s very little guesswork involved.

Besides which, as much as she’s caught up in her feuds right now, Taylor doesn’t actually need other artists’ help to generate headlines. She’s as big a star as music has, and “Look What You Made Me Do” broke streaming records on both YouTube and Spotify on its first day of release. If the pattern holds, the video will be a monster hit, too. I guess we’ll see tonight…at the mother-frickin’ VMAs.