stand with people

Quick PSA

If you’re intending to cause drama with me, or want attack me just because I dislike (NOT HATE) something that you happen to be into (you wanna be into that thing? Cool, you do you; it’s your life, it’s all good), or if you want to attack me for having an opinion, unfollow me right fucking now. 

I’m allowed to feel safe on my blog. Drama and hate of any kind will not and NEVER BE tolerated. If you’re the kind of person to start shit and attack someone without having a civil discussion at all? Bye. Don’t let the door hit your ass on the way out. I have no time for Drama, don’t even try - unfollow me and move on with your life. 

In case anybody is wondering: arguing that “Baby it’s Cold Outside” totally ISN’T a gross rapey Christmas carol because [500 word essay about historical context that is kind of true but also kind of bullshit] makes you look at best kind of naive and really mostly like a manipulative rape apologist.

It’s 2017, lets not you guys. Like even if you want to argue that “what’s in this drink” was a a common joke at the time the song was written—which it was— we all still have to listen to it in the 21st century where date rape drugs are a thing.

And aside from that at it’s core it’s a song about a man who isn’t accepting no for an answer. When you argue that ~~HISTORICAL CONTEXT`~~ makes it fine what you’re really doing is arguing that it’s totally cool to romanticize a past where apparently (according to you) meaningful consent was impossible. That’s pretty gross given that we STILL all have to live in a world where men still think no can mean yes. 

I think the last six weeks is proof that idealizing this attitude fucking sucks. Let’s fucking retire this song.

No amount of ~~HISTORICAL CONTEXT~~ makes it less rapey ok?

hey @ goyim could y'all reblog this if you're actually willing to listen to Jewish people and protect us?

we really need allies right now, and I know seeing this on people’s blogs could be comforting to other Jewish people. But please don’t do this as performative allyship- actually try and help us irl, or at least learn about antisemitism enough to spot it and call it out.

8

The Native Nations March is currently taking place through D.C. and at the White House, capping off a four-day protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline. As indigenous groups from all over the country continue to call for a meeting with Donald Trump, news outlets need make sure the voices of water protectors and environmental activists are heard.

Me: Anti-straight and the constant hatred of straight people often hurts other members of the lgbt community because it throws any of them who are “viewed” as straight under the bus and it’s also harmful to straight trans peope–

Some asshole: SO ARE YOU SAYING STRAIGHTS ARE OPPRESSED? LMFAO FUCKING STRAIGHTIEE :)))) I HATE CISHETS lmfao go choke straightie

In light of an unfortunate display of ignorance I witnessed today, let me take a moment to make something blatantly clear, for anybody that needs it:

-making fun of someone for using a fidget spinner, to the point of them displaying obvious embarrassment and shame, is disgusting. 

-when you say things like “Oh my GOD, I hate those spinners! They’re so annoying, what are they even for haha” you are being willfully ignorant. Spinners are marketed towards people with anxiety, PTSD, OCD, ADD/ADHD, Autistic people, and many other people with brains different from yours that need an outlet to focus, relax, relieve sensory-related issues, and many other things that yours does automatically. Most of the ones I see advertised even specify “For anxiety/stress/ADHD/Autism/etc”

-Making fun of someone for other behaviors such as rocking, hand flapping, echolalia, hair twirling, skin picking, hair pulling, etc is in fact, also a shitty thing of you to do. It’s also unnecessary, cruel, and humiliates the person who is doing those things.

-Don’t make fun of people who use fidget spinners. Don’t make fun of people who stim. I don’t give a rat’s ass if you think it’s unnecessary, or it “looks weird” or it “looks gross.” Don’t do it. You KNOW what you’re doing. I know what you’re doing. I’ve had it, I’m done.

Malec will fight together. Not against each other, together. Combining their two talents, and it’s staggeringly, amazingly good, and emotional. To see them on the battlefield is so awesome. And a battlefield that has deep emotional content and resonance. That’s when it really means something
—  Todd Slavkin and Matt Hastings on Malec in Finale. Take heart! Our boys are going to find their way back to one another! x

1x11 “Scarecrow”
Standing Tall

the art of saying no was a numbing in our mouths. we learned how to form it gently, to swallow the punch, to let down with gentlest hands. we learned how to fake a smile, to force a chuckle, to take disgust and turn it into polite denial, to take fear and weigh our options and submit. 

he said he needed sex because oh it hurt how we made him. he said we should have just smiled back at him. he said that we could have learned karate to fight them. he said that we couldn’t say no, he was our boyfriend. 

how many girls are raised to feel guilty for no. we feel it must come with a reason. our no has to have qualifications. if our no isn’t enough, we are expected to cave in. 

the battle of our inner strength and our outer bodies. how we calculate small injustice versus our personal safety. how we’d form no in small ways that made him feel like it was our fault. how we’d let him down in a way he wouldn’t follow us home. we’d say no without the words; lying about sudden appointments or phone calls, we’d invent husbands, we’d suddenly become best friends with the woman beside us. we always had someone waiting at home for us - usually big and angry - who would notice if we were missing. we enter in our phone numbers with the last two digits switched. we say we’re going to the bathroom we’ll be right back before we take off running. 

and our no, those two letters, was never good enough. we either rejected him too harshly or not clearly. if we said no, we weren’t in love. the no was too forceful, the no was too gentle. the no meant ask nicely, the no meant keep persisting. the no was because we’re all catty and cruel and hate nice men. the no was because we’re all paranoid bitches. the no was wait long enough and it’s a yes. the no was playing hard to get.

and our life was learning. it amazes me sometimes when men tell me, “but she never said no” and i hear her story. how he was her boss and she would lose her job and it was her everything. how he said no but men aren’t allowed to refuse these things. i was thirteen the first time i had to spend a two hour train ride gently turning down a middle-aged man and someone else told me i should have just screamed or hit him or done something. how the girls i told all nodded solemnly because they know what it’s like to be thirteen and scared and to be eighteen and scared and how to be twenty-three and scared. because we’ve all said no and had it blow up in our faces. we’ve watched men turn from flirty to aggressive. we’ve seen what happens to our friends.

but in the end it’s our fault. don’t you know a man can’t take rejection.

I was kicked out of Overwatch because my experiments to make cat girls real were ‘not feasible’ and 'inhumane’ and 'anime isn’t real Moira’
—  Moira, probably
hi can I get a fuckin uhhhhhhh

badass, accomplished, intelligent leader Lance who is strong in his own right and doesn’t need to be coddled and doesn’t take shit from others AND PEOPLE ACTUALLY LISTEN TO HIM AND RESPECT HIM

To the boy with the universe in his cape and whose eyes shine brighter than the stars. It’s our dear starry price! ☆

To the boy who also doesn’t wear matching socks, but they have stars so it’s cool// Based off the DLC chat!