st. louis exposition

10

When I first saw this “postcard” I thought it was just a plain envelope. However, once I opened it up I discovered that it actually unfolded to show pictures of eight different buildings from the 1904 World’s Fair. Included is the Palace of Transportation, the U.S. Government Building, the Palace of Electricity, the Festival Hall, the Palace of Manufacturers, the Palace of Mines and Metallurgy, the Palace of Liberal Arts, and last but not least, the Machinery Building. Though it isn’t a traditional postcard, I really like how it unfolds to show many different buildings, instead of just featuring one. This is the final installment of the 1904 World’s fair mini-series, I hope you all enjoyed it.

-Emily

World’s Fair Collection, The University of Iowa Libraries, Iowa City, Iowa

MSC0840

St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Missouri, April 30, 1904 

Her sleeves are 1830,
And her skirt is ‘61,
Her tresses in the manner
Of Louis Quinze are done.
Her hat is quaint colonial,
Her brooch is pure antique.
Her belt is 1850,
But when you hear her speak
What year the maid belongs to 
You do not wonder more.
Her dress is many periods,
But her slang is 1904.

4

Here we have two more postcards from the World’s Fair Collection. One is of the Main Lagoon and the other is of the Liberal Arts Building. The Liberal Arts Building, also known as the Palace of Liberal Arts, housed displays categorized as Liberal Arts. Included were displays on fine photography, a coin collection from the British Mint, and different musical instruments.

-Emily

World’s Fair Collection, The University of Iowa Libraries, Iowa City, Iowa

MSC0840

3

For our next postcard from the World’s Fair Collection, we have a postcard featuring a picture of the Festival Hall at night. Designed by Cass Gilbert, the Festival Hall was where many of the plays and music performances took place. It had a huge auditorium and housed the largest pipe organ in the world at that time. I think it looks amazing with all the different colored lights.

-Emily

World’s Fair Collection, The University of Iowa Libraries, Iowa City, Iowa

MSC0840

3

The Louisiana Purchase Exposition, also known as the World’s Fair, took place in St. Louis, Missouri in 1904. This is a postcard from the Fair with a bird’s eye view. I really love the detail on this postcard, especially the little people in the streets. 

-Emily

World’s Fair Collection, The University of Iowa Libraries, Iowa City, Iowa

MSC0840

3

This postcard from the World’s Fair collection is probably my favorite. At first glance it looks a bit boring. However, unlike most postcards that are made of paper, this one is wood. The message on the back is my favorite part, if you read closely you’ll notice that it’s full of tree related puns. 

-Emily

World’s Fair Collection, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa

MSC0840

The Louisiana Purchase Exposition, aka the St. Louis World’s Fair, opened 110 years ago on April 30, 1904, in St. Louis, Missouri.

Mississippi’s “Pecan Horse”, at the St. Louis Exposition., 09/1904

April 30 was a big day for Expos and World’s Fairs - the New York World’s Fair also opened the same day in 1939.

via the National Archives at Kansas City on Twitter

Hugh Bolton Jones - Twilight - 1885

Jones is best known for his paintings of the flat country of New England and New Jersey. The influence of Frederic Edwin Church and the Hudson River School shows in his handling of light and the precision of his en plein air depictions of nature. He painted the varying landscapes of each season of the year, in peaceful harmony. His subtle Barbizon-style studies drew praise, but his insistence on accuracy in his representation of nature was also criticized. His earlier paintings are lit by a clear, bright light, and sharply detailed, while his later works were more muted and lyrical. In his last decades, Jones’ work became increasingly stale, repeating the same subjects and compositions in an outdated style. Thomas B. Clarke (1848–1931) said of him in 1891;

A native painter of American landscape, who has never been touched by any fashions in art, is H. Bolton Jones. He paints Nature for herself and not for the sake of illustrating any theory as to how she might or should be painted. He studies her form, color and various characteristics, and gives us the result of his investigations in transcripts of familiar scenes that are rich in rural charms. His drawing is careful and correct, his color vivacious and his execution finished… It is by his American landscape that America knows and will remember him.

Jones exhibited at the National Academy of Design between 1867 and 1927. He exhibited at the Paris Salons (1877–81), Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts Annual (1879–85, 1891–1902, 1917–18), Boston Art Club (1881–1909). In 1884 Jones exhibited with the first exhibition of the Society of Painters in Pastels. He also exhibited at the Art Institute of Chicago, Society of American Artists (1902) and the Corcoran Gallery of Art (1907–12). He won prizes for his submissions at the World’s Columbian Exposition (Chicago, 1893), Exposition Universelle (Paris, 1889), Exposition Universelle (Paris, 1900), Louisiana Purchase Exposition (St. Louis, 1904) and Panama–Pacific International Exposition (San Francisco, 1915).

Jones’ paintings are held by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, the Corcoran Gallery of Art, the Brooklyn Museum, and the Smithsonian Institution.