sprouted quinoa

2 nourishing bowls for lunch the other day-avocado, grilled mushrooms, baked pumpkin and potato with moroccan spices, quinoa, sprouts, coconut yoghurt, salad and some wholewheat crackers :)

✨instagram✨:@veganzoejessica

~Protein packed Stuffed Peppers~

Ingredients:

  • 1 red bell pepper
  • ½ cup cooked quinoa
  • ¼ cup fresh cilantro, chopped
  • ½ cup alfalfa sprouts
  • ½ cup black beans, cooked
  • ½ of an avocado
  • The juice of ½ a lime
  • ¼ TSPs of garlic powder, fresh ground pepper, and cayenne pepper to taste

Directions:

  • Slice the pepper in half and remove the stem and seeds
  • Combine the spices, lime juice, avocado, and cilantro in a small bowl and mash with a fork to create fresh guacamole
  • Now stuff your pepper!! Layer however you like, I layered mine with beans on the bottom, then quinoa, then guac, then the sprouts to top it all off. Enjoy!! :)

These babies are a perfect workout recovery meal if you have sore muscles, or even if you just want something filling and delicious to get you through the day! 

via IG @choosingchia

Buddha Bowl

  • ½ cup quinoa 
  • 1 sweet potato 
  • ½ cup edemame 
  • ½ cup Brussels sprouts 
  • ½ avocado 
  • ¼ cup pickled cabbage 
  • Sesame seeds for sprinkles
  1. Preheat the oven to 425, slice your Brussels sprouts and sweet potatoes, and bake for 15-20 minutes. 
  2. Cook your quinoa according to package 
  3. Place the cabbage in a bowl with ¼ cup water, ¼ cup rice vinegar, 1 tbsp maple syrup, 1 tsp salt. 
  4. Let soak for 15 minutes while your quinoa cooks. Cook edemame according to package directions.

Sneak peek into my ‘Get Healthy With Me’ guide! This list will be featured in the upcoming guide. Enjoy!

Vegetables:
- Asparagus
- Broccoli
- Green Beans
- Sweet Potatoes
- Mushrooms
- Red + Green Pepper
- Onions
- Spinach
- Lettuce
- Cucumbers
- Carrots (baby sized + regular)
- Tofu (not technically a vegetable, I know, but it’s a vegetable product and a good source of protein)

Fruits:
- In season fruits
- Bananas
- Strawberries
- Blueberries
- Avocados
- Pineapple
- Mangoes
- Nectarines
- Plums
- Kiwi
- Grapes
- Tomatoes
- Lemon
- Apples
- Raspberries

Grains, Noodles, Bread & “Good Carbs”
- Oats
- Quinoa
- Sprouted Wheat Bread
- Wholemeal Pasta
- Brown/White/Black Rice
- Buckwheat

Nuts, Seeds, Fats
- Almonds
- Sunflower Seeds
- Cashews
- Flaxseeds
- Peanuts
- Pumpkin Seeds
- Walnuts

Legumes
- Beans
- Chickpeas
- Lentils

Condiments:
- Salsa
- Sriracha
- Hummus
- Tabasco Sauce

QUINOA SUSHI

Try a healthier alternative to take-away sushi rolls (which are often filled with not so natural ingredients)
Replace white rice for Quinoa and fill them with what ever you like!

Ingredients

1 Tbsp rice wine vinegar
1 tsp coconut / palm sugar
½ tsp sea salt
2 cups cooked quinoa (or ½ cup for per roll)
I packet of toasted nori sheets
1 ripe avocado, sliced length ways
1 cucumber, slides length ways
Fresh Sprouts
Natural pickled ginger
Tamari sauce  

Method


1.
Prepare all ingredients on a chopping board, on clean dry surface lay out nori sheets, fill a small cup with luke warm water.
2. Combine vinegar, sugar and salt in a bowl, stirring to dissolve the sugar. Pour this mixture over the cooked quinoa and combine well.
3.
Take ½ cup of the quinoa and spread evenly over a nori sheet. In a line, lay out the toppings, length ways.  Roll sheet tightly until 1 inch before the edge, apply luke warm water to the edge and finish rolling to seal.
4.
Using a very sharp knife, slice rolls – serve with Tamari sauce to dip!

We used avocado, cucumber and sprouts to fill the quinoa sushi, other ingredient ideas include carrots, peppers, yams, asparagus, eggplant, 

QUINOA SUSHI

Try a healthier alternative to take-away sushi rolls (which are often filled with not so natural ingredients)
Replace white rice for Quinoa and fill them with what ever you like!

Ingredients

1 Tbsp rice wine vinegar
1 tsp coconut / palm sugar
½ tsp sea salt
2 cups cooked quinoa (or ½ cup for per roll)
I packet of toasted nori sheets
1 ripe avocado, sliced length ways
1 cucumber, slides length ways
Fresh Sprouts
Batural pickled ginger
Tamari sauce  

Method


1.
 Prepare all ingredients on a chopping board, on clean dry surface lay out nori sheets, fill a small cup with luke warm water.
2. Combine vinegar, sugar and salt in a bowl, stirring to dissolve the sugar. Pour this mixture over the cooked quinoa and combine well.
3.
 Take ½ cup of the quinoa and spread evenly over a nori sheet. In a line, lay out the toppings, length ways.  Roll sheet tightly until 1 inch before the edge, apply luke warm water to the edge and finish rolling to seal.
4.
 Using a very sharp knife, slice rolls – serve with Tamari sauce to dip!

We used avocado, cucumber and sprouts to fill the quinoa sushi, other ingredient ideas include carrots, peppers, yams, asparagus, eggplant,

Pan seared brown butter sage basted salmon, grilled citrus haloumi, sage roasted butternut squash&brussel sprout pickled quinoa arugula salad, pickled dried cherries, balsamic pomelo vin, pomelo maldon salt, pomelo scented olive oil

This was fun to make! Love fuckin with pomelo, it smells so floral and tastes so bitter and sweet 🦄🦄🦄

saraellieisabella-deactivated20  asked:

Hi!! I'm not sure if you know how to answer my question, but here it is: I've been switching my lifestyle to mainly raw/ 801010 lately (from healthy vegan) and I'm concerned: is it really true that every essential vitamin is found in raw plants? I keep reading that legumes, grains and such have somewhat better health benefits. If I do go raw and fruit-based will I be missing something and what should I mainly eat thats of essential nutritional value?

Hi there!

The short answer to the first question, I believe, is yes (: Two texts which have particularly inspired me personally are The 801010 Diet by Douglas Graham and The China Study by T.Colin Campbell & Thomas.M Campbell. Both fully support and encourage veganism. The former strongly recommends an entirely raw diet. The latter focuses primarily on the link between nutrition and disease, observing the correlations of consumption of meat/dairy vs plant-foods and the consequences on human health.

I have currently opted for an ‘in-between’ [cooked vegan and fully raw vegan] option - not to be confused as being ‘the best of both worlds’- but for me right now it’s the best way to incorporate a high level of raw foods into my diet in a comfortably affordable way. The staples I aim to include most days are sweet fruits & other fruits during the day; greens late afternoon (if I haven’t already eaten some with fruit) in the form of a salad; followed by cooked carbs such as rice [or sometimes lentils] and steamed vegetables. The latter meal is used as an affordable way to increase protein & iron levels etc. but is by no means necessary in order to sustain good health if access to an unlimited supply of greens and ripe fruit is available.  

Veganism is not expensive, but a raw vegan diet can be, particularly when you have limited access to fresh produce. Growing some of your own food to supplement the diet can make all the difference in terms of creating a financially sustainable solution to this challenge. I really can’t wait to have the opportunity to try this myself. I find the prospect of growing my own food hugely exciting! (: Anyway, I’m straying from the question…

Key staples on a fully raw diet are: greens (e.g. lettuce, cucumber, chard) and sweet fruits (e.g. bananas, dates). A variety of other fruit is also very important, along with small quantities of nuts, seeds [and avocado if desired]. The easiest way to get to grips with the amount you require and the essential nutrients found in various foods is to use something like cronometer, where you can track the percentage of the RDAs you currently consume and highlight exactly what you’re missing, if anything.

I answered a question recently (here) which considers various nutrients commonly overlooked or ‘forgotten’ on a raw vegan diet, and how to source these nutrients naturally from raw plant foods. I’ve also since come across some useful info on incrediblesmoothies.com.

The image below (from fullyraw.com) illustrates a rough gauge of the ratios of each kind of food to incorporate into a fully raw vegan lifestyle.

There are loads of great examples showing what various people consume in a day on a fully raw lifestyle, but there is no set amount of calories or combinations of food that will suit everyone. Here are a few videos from a selection of raw vegans showing their average daily consumption:

FullyRawKristina: summer edition & winter edition

Rawvana English

Rawsome Healthy

I hope this answer was helpful! To conclude my little essay :p, here’s a quick reference guide to sourcing essential nutrients in raw plant foods:

VITAMIN A (AS BETA-CAROTENE)

Carrots, kale, spinach, leafy greens, pumpkin, collard greens, watermelon, cantaloupe melon, apricot, mango, papaya, pear, broccoli.

VITAMIN B1 - THIAMINE 

Romaine lettuce, spinach, tomatoes, watermelon, carrots, pineapple, oranges, Swiss chard, collard greens, sesame seeds, grapes, sunflower seeds, sprouted lentils, green peas, yellow corn, cabbage, cauliflower.

VITAMIN B2 - RIBOFLAVIN

Bananas, Swiss chard, spinach, romaine lettuce, collard greens, kale, tomatoes, strawberries, raspberries, asparagus, persimmons, crimini mushrooms, broccoli, green beans, cabbage, Brussels sprouts.

VITAMIN B3 - NIACIN

Avocados, dates, tomatoes, leafy greens, carrots, collard greens, spinach, raspberries, Swiss chard, kale, cantaloupe, broccoli, sweet potatoes, asparagus, nuts, mushrooms, sprouted whole grains, crimini mushrooms, green peas.

VITAMIN B5 – PANTOTHENIC ACID

Avocados, strawberries, tomato, collard greens, Swiss chard, sprouted whole grains, broccoli, sunflower seeds, crimini mushrooms, yellow corn, cauliflower.

VITAMIN B6 - PYRIDOXINE 

Dragon fruit, bananas, avocados, spinach, bell pepper, turnip greens, celery, kale, collard greens, watermelon, tomato, cantaloupe, flax seeds, pineapple, grapes, garlic, cauliflower, mustard greens, cabbage, asparagus, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, onions.

VITAMIN B7 - BIOTIN

Swiss chard, tomatoes, romaine lettuce, carrots, cucumbers, raspberries, strawberries, sprouted legumes, cabbage, cauliflower, walnuts, onions.

VITAMIN B9 - FOLATE 

Leafy greens, spinach, turnip greens, leaf lettuce, romaine lettuce, parsley, collard greens, kelp, avocado, papaya, oranges, flax seeds, asparagus, green peas, sunflower seeds, broccoli, cauliflower, beats, sprouted lentils, Brussels sprouts, summer squash, cabbage, corn.

VITAMIN B12

Check out this video.

VITAMIN C

Red pepper, parsley, guava, kiwi, goji berry, lychee, papaya, strawberry, orange, lemon, cantaloupe, leafy greens, grapefruit, raspberry, tangerine, passion fruit, spinach, lime, mango, blackberry, honeydew melon, cranberry, blueberry, pineapple, grape, apricot, plum, watermelon, banana, carrot, cherry, peach, apple, pear, lettuce, cucumber, celery, broccoli, cauliflower, garlic, cabbage (green), tomato, zucchini, Brussels sprouts, snow peas, asparagus.

VITAMIN D

Check out this link.

VITAMIN E

Avocado, spinach, leafy greens, blueberries, papaya, bell peppers, kiwifruit, coconut, tomatoes, carrots, raw almond butter, sunflower seeds, almonds, asparagus, hazelnuts, sprouted whole grains, olives, cold-pressed olive oil, broccoli, corn.

VITAMIN K

Leafy greens, parsley, spinach, kale, Swiss chard, avocado, kiwifuit, cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, Brussels sprouts.

CALCIUM

Sesame seeds, oranges, figs, collard greens, kale, spinach, dandelion greens, young Thai coconuts, celery, turnip greens, mustard greens, parsley, sprouted chick peas (garbanzo beans), raw hummus, flax seeds, sea vegetables (kelp, wakame and hijiki), almonds, sprouted quinoa, broccoli, cauliflower, almond milk.

IRON

Leafy greens, spinach, kale, Swiss chard, sesame seeds, sprouted lentils, pumpkin seeds, spices (oregano, thyme, cinnamon), shiitake mushrooms, green beans, broccoli, olives, sprouted quinoa, green peas, beets.

MAGNESIUM

Leafy greens, spinach, kale, Swiss chard, collard greens, parsley, sesame seeds, turnip greens, cucumber, celery, flax seeds, nuts, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, mustard greens, summer squash, broccoli, almonds, green beans, sprouted quinoa, sprouted buckwheat, green peas, cashews.

MANGANESE

Pineapple, spinach, flax seeds, clove, cinnamon, romaine lettuce, collard greens, sesame seeds, raspberries, turnip greens, Swiss chard, kale, grapes, strawberries, blueberries, figs, carrots, pumpkin seeds, walnuts, almonds, sprouted lentils, sunflower seeds, garlic, summer squash, green beans, broccoli, beets, green peas, sprouted quinoa.

POTASSIUM 

Oranges, bananas, avocado, tomatoes, apricots, beet greens, Swiss chard, papaya, spinach, romaine lettuce, celery, turnip greens, collard greens, cantaloupe, kale, carrots, strawberry, kiwi, prunes, grapes, broccoli, garlic, winter squash, sprouted lentils, crimini mushrooms, mustard greens, summer squash, eggplant, green beans.

COPPER

Avocados, pear, prunes, Swiss chard, turnip greens, flax seeds, sesame seeds, tomatoes, spinach, kale, kiwifruit, Brazil nuts, sunflower seeds, green olives, almonds, beets, crimini mushrooms, sprouted lentils, cashews, walnuts, pumpkin seeds, mustard greens, peas, asparagus, green beans, sprouted quinoa.

ZINC

Sesame seeds, black currant, spinach, Swiss chard, collard greens, almonds, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, sprouted whole grains, crimini mushrooms, sea vegetables, basil, thyme, summer squash, asparagus, broccoli, peas, mustard greens.

MOLYBDENUM 

Green beans, sunflower seeds, sprouted lentils, sprouted whole grains, nuts.

SODIUM/CHLORIDE

Sea vegetables (kelp, dulse), kale, spinach, celery, Swiss chard, collard greens, olives, beets, many vegetables.

PHOSPHORUS 

Sprouted whole grains, pine nuts, sprouted chickpeas, garlic, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, Brazil nuts, filberts, pistachios, hickory, pecans, walnuts, almonds, sprouted lentils.

IODINE 

One of the nutrients addressed in this video by MeganElizabeth, which considers the most commonly neglected nutrients on a raw vegan diet.

SELENIUM

Brazil nuts, sunflower seeds, mushrooms (crimini, shiitake and some varieties of portobello).

CHROMIUM

Romaine lettuce, tomatoes, bell peppers, apples, spinach, onions, sprouted whole grains, nuts, green beans, broccoli.

PROTEIN

Check out this video :)

sarahpaulsonqueen  asked:

I'm debating wether or not to go vegan, problem is my parents aren't, and idk if they'd let me, since I may not get enough protein and stuff like that, and another reason is that I really love how meat tastes like, but im disgusted by the industry...

Makes me so sad that people still believe the protein thing 

Yes meat and other animal products contain protein. They’re also full of saturated fats and cholesterol. Plant food also has lots of protein! There’s no such thing as protein deficiency, not where most of us live anyway. You have to be quite literally starving to death. (almonds, cashews, and other nuts & nut butters. Black beans, chickpeas, soybeans and other beans. Pumpkin seeds & other seeds. Tofu. Greens- spinach, broccoli, peas, brussels sprouts. Some others -Quinoa, oatmeal, plant milks, baked potatoes, pasta.) + more. Food is protein. A lot of people go vegan and they’re used to eating all these really dense fatty foods so they don’t feel as full at first and say they’re missing protein, when really they’re not getting enough calories and aren’t use to eating so much fiber. Your body adjusts. Eat.

 Most vegans don’t go vegan because they didn’t like the taste of meat. Most of us grew up eating it, too. You get over. There’s more important things, and new foods you can fall in love with. Going vegan makes you actually appreciate food, and teaches you how to be a creative eater. There’s no way around eating meat and not supporting these industries, just isn’t. If you need an extra push you can watch Earthlings, no one usually goes back after that hah.