spring beer

Berliner Weisse mit Schuß. Berlin’s traditional cloudy sour wheat beer is drunk with a shot of either green Waldmeistersyrup (woodruff) or red Himbeersyrup (raspberry) - a very refreshing summer drink. The beer dates back to the 1500’s. By the 1800’s, it was the most popular alcoholic drink in Berlin with 700 breweries producing it; by the late 1900’s, there were only 2 left in Berlin and a few in other parts of Germany. Authorities trace its origins back to Hamburg, Northern Germany. Friedrich Wilhelm, King of Prussia, encouraged the spread of the beer through Prussia, declaring it as “best for our climate”, and having his son, Friedrich der Große, trained to brew it. A popular story is that Napoleon’s troops dubbed it “The Champagne of the North” in 1809. Berliner Kindl and Schultheiss currently are the main brands.

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If it’s spring, it’s flea market time in Helvetiaplatz! Pretty much in the middle of the redlight district of Zurich, every Saturday starting in March will bring together professional or amateur hagglers for another happy round of exchanging valuables. I’m not saying the stuff there comes cheap, no way, yet still the market is filled to the brim with almost everything you can imagine (except tanks or livestock) and the lookers are pouring. I must have missed the market for too long but I noticed a new category of visitors - the young hipster and/or boho looking for vintage extensions of their selves or just browsing through shabby vinyl covers. Which I did as well thank you very much.

I’m not sure what’s the best Swiss beer match but a Perla Nera from Flims brewery shall do it. A wonderful toffee caramel nose with a rather disappointing watered down taste (and looks), this imperial stout with its great start only managed to confuse me.

Die Berliner Weisse is a cloudy white beer of around 3% abv. It’s a regional variation on white beer styles from Northern Germany, dating back to at least the 16th century. It can be made from combinations of barley and wheat malt. By the late 19th century, it was the most popular alcoholic drink in Berlin with 50 breweries producing it. By the late 20th century, there were only 2 breweries left. The style has been given Protected Geographical Indication within the EU, where it may only be applied to beers brewed in Berlin. Authorities trace its origins to a beer from Hamburg which was copied and developed by 16th century brewer Cord Broihan. His Halberstädter Broihan became very popular, and a version was being brewed by the Berlin doctor J.S. Elsholz in the 1640s. Frederick Wilhelm encouraged the spread of the beer through Prussia, declaring it as “best for our climate”, and having his son, Frederick the Great, trained to brew it. A popular story is that Napoleon’s troops dubbed it “The Champagne of the North” in 1809. The 2 remaining Berlin breweries, Berliner Kindl and Schultheiss, are owned by the Dr Oetker Group. The drink is typically served in a bowl-shaped glass with a shot of Himbeersirup (raspberry syrup) or with green Waldmeister (woodruff) flavoring.

Lupin makes everyone queer

So today I went out on the streets, dressed as Lupin the Third (minus the pink tie because that would be too much) and stop at a terrace to order a beer. The waiter brings it to me, I am drinking it, slowly. Then, he comes back to me and suggests me to taste another beer. I am surprised at first but I say yes. He brings me that second beer called “Elixir”. It is delicious and he sees me drinking it. He is admitedly good looking and I feel like there was some spark between us, which troubled me a lot, as I am more attracted to women. And yet, that fleeting moment of intimacy warmed my lonely cold heart.

I left the terrace and thought to myself “there is no way Lupin the Third isn’t bisexual”.