sports-gambling

For those heading to Las Vegas hoping to win vast amounts of money, use this graphic as a friendly reminder that things probably won’t work out in your favor. That said, if you want to lose a smaller percentage of your money, the scatter plot suggests you should stick with the data points hovering near the x-axis.

Your best bet is the $100 slot machines, where the casinos take only 3.6% of your money! Of course, you’ll need a hefty stack of Benjamins if you want to play for more than a couple minutes. And if you are concerned about the magnitude of money lost rather than the percentage, you may want to move over to the penny slots, where you’ll still lose only 11.8%.

If you’re a sports fan, betting on baseball will give you slightly better odds than basketball and football. You’re much less likely to lose your money betting on those sports than on racing.

If you like heading to the tables, bingo is the game-o. The house only takes in 8.8% of the wagers there, followed by blackjack (11.1%). Stay away from 3-card poker, where gamblers lose an average of 32.5% of their money.

The weekly average values in this graphic were derived from one year of data for all non-restricted locations in the Las Vegas Strip area.

Data source: http://gaming.nv.gov/index.aspx?page=149 (12-month summary of Feb 2014 pdf).

I know people normally order the cookies first, and then get them delivered weeks later, but sometimes a mother goes out of town, and the stepfather isn’t on top of his stepdaughter’s extracurricular activities, and then the child doesn’t know how to sell cookies on her own, so the kindly uncle, with a busy radio job, has to step in and buy up a bunch of boxes, so she can go camping with her friends while you continue to disappoint everyone with your inattention to detail, and sports gambling, and idiotic taste in shoes, Steve Carlsberg! Yes, Steve, this is how things sometimes happen.
— 

Welcome to Night Vale

Episode 44 - Cookies

anonymous asked:

Is it possible for a character to get so addicted to the adrenaline rush of fighting that it negatively impacts their everyday life?

Adrenaline junkies are a real thing. Though the actual term is a bit of a misnomer, as far as I know, there’s no actual chemical or psychological addiction to adrenaline itself. Adrenaline junkies are a variety of sensation seekers.

Quick caveat, it’s been a long time since I took a psych class, so I’m a little rusty, and piecing things back together from memory and the internet, mostly the internet.

Sensation seekers are individuals who are unusually drawn towards constant, intense, sensory stimulation. This can lead to a pathological attraction towards dangerous and (subjectively) exciting experiences. Which in turn leads to the individual engaging in risky behavior. That may be gambling, extreme sports, violence, or any number of other behaviors.

It’s probably worth adding, sensation seeking is an entirely normal component of human psychology. We’re all driven to experience new things to one degree or another, and the sensation seeking impulse appears to be affected by hereditary factors. Put more simply, your brain is wired to poke you in the ass occasionally, and get you to try something new. What differentiates most people from a sensation seeker is how pronounced that impulse is.

In severe cases, sensation seeking behaviors absolutely affect daily life. The impulse to push boundaries or engage in “unsafe” behavior is more pronounced, meaning they’re more likely to blow through stop signs or speed while driving. It can (and probably will) affect the kind of media they consume. More aggressive content will, usually, win out over other alternatives. Be that TV, music, movies, whatever.

This is reinforced by a euphoric high that the individual experiences when engaging in risky behaviors. It’s not exactly like drug addiction, because it’s their own brain chemistry on a rampage, but the resulting behavior is similar.

The problem with engaging in risky behavior for extended periods of time is, eventually, your luck will run out. Rather obviously, the consequences will depend on what stupid thing the sensation seeker was doing this time. As it turns out, illegal street racers tend to have different outcomes from bungee jumpers. Though, being turned into human tomato paste is a legitimate option for both.

The problem with frequent hand to hand combat is the significant strain it puts on the body. I know we’ve gone over this, but fighting is painful. Even if you win, you’ll still walk away with injuries. Injuries which need to heal before you go back in for more. For someone with a pathological sensation seeking drive, they’re not going to wait, and (given time, and enough violence) the consequences will accumulate.

This is ignoring the legal issues involved. Someone who is pathologically drawn to fighting will run afoul of the law, quickly. This may simply be from the fights themselves, or the individual may escalate to increase the high experienced.

Before someone suggests a character who restricts themselves to professional or semi-professional bouts, remember a major element of this is the desire to engage in risky behavior. This includes not taking enough time between bouts to recover, because the impulse is to get back in.

Remember, this is a fundamental personality trait. While the behavioral loop, and some elements of this are superficially similar to an addiction, this isn’t one. Someone does not go from normal to being a combat adrenaline junkie. They may go from extreme sports to drunken brawls, but the underlying elements that lead to this kind of behavior are already there. That doesn’t mean people in their life were aware of the risk, however. Self-delusion can be a powerful drug.

While it can be a little difficult to fully unpack, I’d recommend taking a look at Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk. It’s not an easy read, and is a book that’s remarkably easy to misread. Palahniuk has a very vulgar approach to violence, which suits the subject matter, but might not be something you feel like parsing.

-Starke

This blog is supported through Patreon. If you enjoy our content, please consider becoming a Patron.

5

Chaupar Game Pieces

India (Rajasthan), Mughal, 1750 - 1800

Painted and lacquered ivory

Chaupar is a game similar to pachisi. The Penn Museum wrote an interesting article about pachisi and chaupar and wrote:

The first description of any of these games seems to have been written in the 16th century, when chaupar was a common gambling sport at the court of the Mughal emperor Akbar in Agra and Fatehpur Sikri. The emperor himself was an addict and in the courtyard of his palace at Fatehpur Sikri he had laid out in flagstones a huge “board” where he and his courtiers enjoyed the game, using slaves as the playing pieces. How much older than Akbar the game is, it is not possible to say, but Abul Fazl, vizier and historian of Akbar, remarks of chaupar, “From times of old, the people of Hindustan have been fond of this game,” but adds no further information about dating. Some of the features and paraphernalia of the games, though not the games themselves or the board, seem to have existed in India as long ago as the latter part of the third millennium B.C.

dlvr.it
Super Bowl 2014 Prop Bets: Non-Football Related Wagers to Make You Money

External image
Although plenty of fans will enjoy the action on the field during Super Bowl XLVIII, some people will need a little extra to stay entertained. Fortunately, there are quite a few interesting prop bets available during the big game. 

On gambling sites like Bovada, fans can bet on a number of game-related propositions when the Seattle Seahawks take on the Denver Broncos, including how many touchdowns Peyton Manning will throw or who will win Super Bowl MVP.

Additionally, you can wager on random occurrences like the coin toss or what color Gatorade will be thrown on the winning coach. 

Many of these bets are nothing more than luck, but there are a few smart picks that could help make you some extra bucks on Super Bowl Sunday. While you should not gamble your life’s savings away, do not be afraid to put a few dollars on these bets.

Note: All betting info courtesy of Bovada.

When: Sunday, Feb. 2 at 6:30 p.m. ET

Where: MetLife Stadium, East Rutherford, N.J.

Watch: Fox

Streaming: Fox Sports Go

Mobile: NFL Mobile app

Spread: Denver (-3)

Over-Under: 48

How many times will “12th man” be said during the game? (Over 2)

External image

If you do not know what the 12th man is, you probably have not been paying attention this football season. This is what Seahawks fans call themselves as they try to give their team an extra advantage in home games. 

It has certainly helped at CenturyLink Field, as Seattle posted a 17-1 home record over the past two years. Of course, some people take it a little overboard, via For The Win:

External image
External image

Still, the fan section is a big part of the team, and the fans are certain to be out in full force as the organization looks to win its first-ever Super Bowl.

With announcers Joe Buck and Troy Aikman looking for things to talk about in front of the biggest audience of the year, they are certain to discuss the 12th Man more than a couple of times throughout the broadcast.

The over/under is only two for this wager, so the over is the smart pick.

Will Michael Crabtree mention Richard Sherman in a tweet during the Super Bowl from kickoff until final whistle? (No)

External image

Richard Sherman turned himself into a household name immediately following the Seahawks’ win over the San Francisco 49ers in the NFC Championship Game.

The cornerback had just made a big defensive play against receiver Michael Crabtree to help his team seal the victory. Following the game, he came back with this interview with Erin Andrews of Fox:

External image

Crabtree did not take this lightly, responding with this tweet:

External image

The problem is that he did not mention Sherman by name, something that is necessary for this bet to win. With even more focus on him during the Super Bowl, Crabtree is unlikely to say something that will cause even more controversy.

Besides, Sherman appeared to try to bury the hatchet a bit when he explained on MMQB, “I shouldn’t have attacked Michael Crabtree the way I did. You don’t have to put anybody else down to make yourself bigger.”

While Crabtree still probably dislikes his rival, he will not reignite any problems with a specific tweet. 

Will any member of the Red Hot Chili Peppers be shirtless during their performance? (Yes)

External image

This has nothing to do with the game but instead the halftime show starring Bruno Mars. The Red Hot Chili Peppers will be joining the popular record artists, and they are certain to bring their own style to the show.

Drummer Chad Smith has already showcased an interesting drum set that will be seen at the show:

External image

One thing you have to know about the popular band, though, is that the members are almost always shirtless. Despite getting up there in age, lead singer Anthony Kiedis and bassist Flea still do not seem to own a full wardrobe and are rarely in shirts.

Additionally, the weather is not supposed to be as bad as originally projected, according to Bob Maxon of NBC Connecticut:

External image

Even if the conditions are tough, it is a fairly safe bet to say that one or more members of the popular band will be playing without a shirt.

Follow Rob Goldberg on Twitter for the latest breaking news and analysis.

External image

Read more NFL news on BleacherReport.com

Bodog - NFL Pre-Season Futures, Win Totals, and Super Bowl XLVI Odds

External image

Odds to win the Super Bowl XLVI

New England Patriots 13/2 Green Bay Packers 7/1

Philadelphia Eagles 15/2 San Diego Chargers 11/1

New York Jets 12/1 Atlanta Falcons 14/1

Pittsburgh Steelers 14/1 Baltimore Ravens 16/1

Dallas Cowboys 16/1 New Orleans Saints 16/1

Indianapolis Colts 18/1 New York Giants 25/1

Houston Texans 25/1 Chicago Bears 28/1

Detroit Lions 30/1 Tampa Bay Buccaneers 30/1

Minnesota Vikings 35/1 Kansas City Chiefs 40/1

St. Louis Rams 40/1 San Francisco 49ers 50/1

Miami Dolphins 55/1 Arizona Cardinals 65/1

Oakland Raiders 65/1 Jacksonville Jaguars 75/1

Tennessee Titans 75/1 Seattle Seahawks 80/1

Denver Broncos 80/1 Cleveland Browns 80/1

Cincinnati Bengals 100/1 Washington Redskins 100/1

Carolina Panthers 150/1 Buffalo Bills 150/1

Odds to win the AFC

New England Patriots 3/1 San Diego Chargers 11/2

New York Jets 6/1 Pittsburgh Steelers 13/2

Baltimore Ravens 15/2 Indianapolis Colts 17/2

Houston Texans 14/1 Kansas City Chiefs 20/1

Miami Dolphins 28/1 Oakland Raiders 33/1

Jacksonville Jaguars 35/1 Tennessee Titans 35/1

Denver Broncos 40/1 Cleveland Browns 40/1

Cincinnati Bengals 50/1 Buffalo Bills 75/1

Odds to win the 2011 NFC

Green Bay Packers 15/4 Philadelphia Eagles 17/4

Atlanta Falcons 7/1 Dallas Cowboys 8/1

New Orleans Saints 8/1 New York Giants 12/1

Chicago Bears 14/1 Minnesota Vikings 15/1

Detroit Lions 15/1 Tampa Bay Buccaneers 16/1

St. Louis Rams 20/1 San Francisco 49ers 25/1

Arizona Cardinals 33/1 Seattle Seahawks 40/1

Washington Redskins 50/1 Carolina Panthers 75/1

NFL 2010 - Odds to win NFC North Division

Green Bay Packers 10/19 Chicago Bears 9/2

Detroit Lions 5/1 Minnesota Vikings 15/2

NFL 2010 - Odds to win NFC South Division

Atlanta Falcons 6/5 New Orleans Saints 13/10

Tampa Bay Buccaneers 9/2 Carolina Panthers 20/1

NFL 2010 - Odds to win NFC West Division

St. Louis Rams 8/5 San Francisco 49ers 8/5

Arizona Cardinals 13/4 Seattle Seahawks 6/1

NFL 2010 - Odds to win AFC East Division

New England Patriots 2/3 New York Jets 9/5

Miami Dolphins 15/2 Buffalo Bills 20/1

NFL 2010 - Odds to win AFC North Division

Pittsburgh Steelers 1/1 Baltimore Ravens 6/5

Cleveland Browns 10/1 Cincinnati Bengals 14/1

NFL 2010 - Odds to win AFC South Division

Indianapolis Colts 1/1 Houston Texans 9/5

Tennessee Titans 6/1 Jacksonville Jaguars 7/1

NFL 2010 - Odds to win AFC West Division

San Diego Chargers ½ Kansas City Chiefs 7/2

Oakland Raiders 11/2 Denver Broncos 12/1

Odds to win the 2010 NFC East Division

Philadelphia Eagles 4/5 Dallas Cowboys 11/4

New York Giants 11/4 Washington Redskins 15/1

2011 NFL Regular Season Win Totals

Arizona Cardinals - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season

Over 6.5 (-140) Under 6.5 (+110)

Atlanta Falcons - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season

Over 10.5 (+115) Under 10.5 (-145)

Baltimore Ravens - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season

Over 10.5 (-115) Under 10.5 (-115)

Buffalo Bills - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season

Over 5.5 (-115) Under 5.5 (-115)

Carolina Panthers - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season

Over 4.5 (-130) Under 4.5 (+100)

Chicago Bears - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season

Over 8.5 (-120) Under 8.5 (-110)

Cincinnati Bengals - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season

Over 5.5 (-130) Under 5.5 (+100)

Cleveland Browns - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season

Over 6.5 (-115) Under 6.5 (-115)

Dallas Cowboys - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season

Over 9 (-105) Under 9 (-125)

Denver Broncos - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season

Over 5.5 (-135) Under 5.5 (+105)

Detroit Lions - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season

Over 7.5 (-125) Under 7.5 (-105)

Green Bay Packers - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season

Over 11.5 (-105) Under 11.5 (-125)

Houston Texans - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season

Over 8.5 (-115) Under 8.5 (-115)

Indianapolis Colts - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season

Over 9.5 (-135) Under 9.5 (+105)

Jacksonville Jaguars - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season

Over 6 (-130) Under 6 (+100)

Kansas City Chiefs - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season

Over 7.5 (-125) Under 7.5 (-105)

Miami Dolphins - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season

Over 7.5 (+100) Under 7.5 (-130)

Minnesota Vikings - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season

Over 7 (-135) Under 7 (+105)

New England Patriots- Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season

Over 11.5 (-125) Under 11.5 (-105)

New Orleans Saints - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season

Over 10 (-105) Under 10 (-125)

New York Giants - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season

Over 9.5 (+115) Under 9.5 (-145)

New York Jets - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season

Over 10 (-105) Under 10 (-125)

Oakland Raiders - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season

Over 6.5 (-140) Under 6.5 (+110)

Philadelphia Eagles - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season

Over 10.5 (-140) Under 10.5 (+110)

Pittsburgh Steelers - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season

Over 10.5 (-125) Under 10.5 (-105)

San Diego Chargers - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season

Over 10 (EVEN) Under 10 (-130)

San Francisco 49ers - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season

Over 7.5 (-130) Under 7.5 (+100)

Seattle Seahawks - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season Over 6.5 (+125)

Under 6.5 (-145)

St. Louis Rams - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season Over 7.5 (+105)

Under 7.5 (-135)

Tampa Bay Buccaneers - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season Over 8 (-130)

Under 8 (+100)

Tennessee Titans - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season Over 6.5 (-140)

Under 6.5 (+110)

Washington Redskins - Total wins in the 2011 NFL Regular Season Over 6.5 (+160)

Under 6.5 (-200)

Banner -Online Sports Bettingat Bodog Sportsbook

Bodog - NFL Pre-Season Futures, Win Totals, and Super Bowl XLVI Odds