sporting rifle

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Standard Arms Model G

Patented c.1906 by Morris Smith, manufactured by Standard Arms c.1909-10′s - serial number 7534.
.25 Remington three-round internal box magazine, long stroke gas piston semi-automatic or manual pump action, engraved brass handle - originally lacquered black.

A fancy and unusual ealry semi-automatic sporting rifle, betrayed by the lack of strength of its internal parts which turned it into a jam monster. It’s okay buddy at least you look good when you do it.

2

Shortlane Scavenger 9mm Luger 12 Gauge Shotgun Adapter Review,

Now that I have a 12 gauge break action double barrel shotgun, one thing I’ve always wanted to try are those bizarre chamber adapters. Ever wonder if there was a way to fire 9mm out of a 12 gauge shotgun? Well thanks to Shortlane there is. Chamber adapters are fairly simple tools, basically a metal cylinder with a hole bored in the center to accommodate the cartridge. The adapter is inserted into the chamber of the shotgun, and the cartridge inserted into the adapter. Note that they cannot be used in pump or semi auto shotguns, only break actions.

They type I am firing is the Shortlane Scavenger series in 9mm Luger. It’s the simplest model which is smoothbore and 3 inches long. They also make the “Bug Out” series which is rifled and 3 inches long, the “Zombie Series” which is rifled and 5 inches long, and finally the “Pathfinder” series which is rifled and 8 inches long. They come in common pistol calibers such as .22 long rifle, 9mm luger, .380 ACP, .40 SW,.45 ACP, .45 Long Colt,.357 magnum, and .38 special. Rifled models also feature rubber O rings to make the inserts fit more snugly in the chamber. Another company called MCA sports makes rifled inserts that are 10 inches and 18 inches long, with more exotic pistol calibers, and three rifle calibers; .30-40 krag, .30-30, and 7.62x39.

Now I’m under no delusion that I’m going to get great performance out of these. Basically using these chamber inserts is like firing a smoothbore snubby revolver with a loose barrel. The bullet will not spin, definitely something that will ruin accuracy. It’s fired from only a 3 inch barrel which will decrease velocity greatly, and the insert probably vibrates with each shot. Also, my shotgun is meant for wingshooting, meaning the front sight (bead) is made for aerial targets, and thus shoots high when firing at ground targets. 

So is the Shortland adapter in 9mm as crappy as I thought it would be? Well, I’m proud to say that I can easily achieve MOA accuracy, if MOA was measured at five feet. Yeah, these things suck. I was firing American Eagle brand 9mm Luger FMJ with 115 grain bullets. Note that these inserts are not made to safely fire +P ammunition.  After doing some “sighting in” I determined that I needed to hold low, right at the bottom the target, and to the right, down at the right had corner. I first shot open handed at 25 yards, firing 12 rounds. The instruction manual says to expect practical accuracy at 10 yards, but I decided to push it a bit. 

At this range where the bullet will hit is near unpredictable.   I can hold in the same place, but sometimes it will fly high, fly low, and when it does hit the target it’s not anywhere near the bullseye. After firing at 25 yards, I moved up half distance to around 12 yards. At 12 yards I got much better results without missing the target and getting something close to a predictable group. Notice how the bullet holes look mangled rather than being clean round bullet holes. That’s because without rifling the bullet isn’t spinning, and it quickly loses flight stability and begins tumbling.

Here are my results, the left target at 25 yards and right at 10 yards.

So yeah, these things really aren’t good for much of anything. If you have a 12 gauge shotgun, and some assorted ammo you want to make go bang, these inserts will do.  I guess if you only had a shotgun and only a box of 9mm, you could use it for hunting if you were starving and desperate. I wouldn’t hunt with it under normal circumstances, but if I was starving and had no other options, it would be a practical tool, though far from ideal. One advantage is that it does add more versatility to a shotgun. I could see people in the Great Depression appreciating these inserts, despite their limitations. Back in the days of my Great Grandfather, all the family could afford was a 12 gauge double barrel, which was used not only to feed the family with small game and birds, but also large game when loaded with slugs, and pressed into service scaring away Ku Klux Klan thugs whenever they decided it was “harass Italian Catholic Immigrant” day.

Finally I must state that the Scavenger series I used is the simplest and crudest model offered. They retail for $24.99 a piece. The longer rifled models are  more expensive but probably much more effective.  I’m going to purchase the 5 inch rifled model and test it to see how much better they perform. If I find they are practical I might get other calibers, and perhaps one of the 8 inch rifled models. While the scavenger might suck, I’ve seen youtube videos were shooters have gotten some pretty impressive accuracy out of the 5 and 8 inch rifled models. If they are practical, I might also considering getting 10 inch inserts from MCA sports in a rifle caliber cartridge, either .30-30 or 7.62x39 (which actually have similar ballistics).  We shall see.

COLORGUARD ANIME??!!

 Now that Yuri!!! on ice has ended I’ve had some withdrawals… Can someone make a color guard anime? Just imagine the possibilities that this idea could bring.

1. First of all color guard is a team sport and it is usually constructed with a hefty amount of individuals (both male and female). The dedication and copartnership that a team must have would spice up countless scenarios of drama within the team and their rivals (do I smell love interests, diversity, and agnst?).

2. Second of all the animation that it would take to create the fluidity of both the dancers and the flags/rifles/sabers (or even the marching band) would illustrate a magnificent outcome that would have jaw-dropping results.

3. And third of all the music that would be composed for the series would be kickass.

2

Daewoo AR-100

Civilian model of the South Korean K2 rifle, the AR-100 is often considered a hybrid of the AK and AR platforms. They were imported as the AR-100′s in the original side-folding stock configuration but later models were turned into sporting rifle with thumbhole stocks. Note the low profile picatinny rail which is an aftermarket addition. The factory rifles did not have this feature but modern versions of the K2 might. (GRH)

2

My New Henry Big Boy in .357 mag/.38 Special

About a month and a half ago I used my tax refund to buy this beautiful new lever action rifle. The Henry Big Boy is a lever action produced by Henry Repeating Arms Co., one of their many lever action products. Mine is chambered in .357 magnum, many of their rifles are chambered in pistol caliber cartridges, hearkening back to the days of the Old West when Winchester lever actions were chambered in cowboy pistol cartridges such as .44-40 and .45 Colt. The Henry Big Boy comes in .357, .44 mag, and .45 colt. Since mine is .357, it can also feed and chamber .38 special as well.  I bought this possibly as a short range hunting rifle, something to use when I don’t feel like using my flintlock.  Plus, since it can fire .38 special, it is a very economical plinking gun.  .357 is a fairly powerful pistol cartridge, but from a rifle it sports some very impressive ballistics, and it’s certainly good enough to take medium sized game at short ranges.

The most notable feature of the Big Boy is its brass frame. They also offer the same model with an iron frame, a checkered stock, and rubber butt pad. I considered buying that one because it would probably be more practical as a rifle to lug through thick woods. However the lovely gleam of it’s brass frame, brass butt plate, and brass barrel bands was too much to resist.  It will probably get scratched, oh well, it was worth it. The rifle features a neat hexagon barrel, adding to its nostalgic old timey look and giving you the feeling that you are handling an old fashioned cowboy gun. It features a ten round fixed magazine, which is loaded through a loading port at the end of the barrel.  To load the magazine port must be twisted and magazine rod removed. Then you insert the cartridges one at a time, then re-insert the magazine rod.

When I first bought this rifle the magazine rod was very hard to twist and operate.  However the more and more I work it, the more its wearing in and its becoming progressively easier.

Often the Henry Golden Boy and Big Boy is mistaken as a replica of the American Civil War era Henry M1860 lever action rifle. However this is not true. Rather, the Big Boy is almost like a hybrid of a Henry rifle, a Winchester Model 1866, and a Marlin Model 336.  It has the loading port system and tube magazine of the Henry, the forearm and brass frame of a Winchester M1866, and a Marlin action.  Regardless you still get this feeling of handling and firing an antique cowboy lever gun, a must for my tastes. The sights are simple, featuring and adjustable ramp rear sight and a front post sight.

Another feature I must mention is a transfer bar, which means you can have the hammer uncocked and down on a round without risk of accidental discharge, which is probably the most important modern feature on a rifle with design elements dating to the 19th century.

With .357 the action is very smooth and operates without any problem.  I did some plinking with both .357 and .38 special.  I purchased some cheap bottom shelf ammo not thinking about the possibility of feeding issues. Problem is I bought this really cheap .38 special ammo that used lacquered steel casings, and ejection was certainly is issue. I later bought some better quality .38 special with brass casings and found they fed with far less issues, though the action isn’t as smooth as with .357 and you kind of have to work the lever harder and faster to ensure proper feeding and ejection. The recoil is very light, even firing .357 magnum. Recoil wise I would compare it to 7.62x39.  So it will definitely save your shoulder despite the brass buttplate.

At first I just did some simple close range plinking at steel swivel targets at 25 yards.  The rifle hits right on at that range and it certainly is a fun plinker.  Then I took it to the 100 yard range to see what I can do. I must admit I had a bit of a handicap shooting, I work night shift and it was a particularly bright day. So my eyes were very sensitive to light and my vision a bit blurry. I think I’m turning into a vampire. 

I was shooting from a bench rest with open sights, using Fiocchi .357 magnum ammo with 142 grain bullets.  I was firing three rounds groups.  First I tested it at 50 yards. At 50 yards the target and visible and well defined. Note that each increment on the grid is one inch.

The first group shot to the right and high aiming at the bull. I decided to play with the adjustable ramp sight, lowering it one increment.  The result was the 2nd group, which shot low.  Thus I reset the sight and adjusted but aiming low, and to the left, resulting in the third group. At 50 yards it shoots on average 1-2 inch groupings.

I then continued by shooting at 100 yards.  At 100 yards the front sight completely covers the bullseye and black portion of the target.

Despite increasing range to 100 yards it still shot high, in fact it shot much higher than at 50 yards. The first grouping I was aiming right for the bull, resulting again in a high group, with one shot completely off the target. I can only assume know that the .357 magnum’s ballistic arc from this rifle is much more considerable than I had previously imagined.  Thus I adjust the the ramp sight down one increment. Like at 50 yards it then shot too low (2nd group). So I reset the sight and decided to aim low, resulting in the third group. At 100 yards it shoots around 2-3 inch groupings on average.

In my final test, I went back to 50 yards. This time I was not using the bench rest, instead firing off hand.  Nor was I taking time with my shots.  Basically the scenario was that I am the sheriff of a western town and some outlaws are up to no good and I have to deal with them.  So I was shooting as quickly as possible while keeping rounds on target.  This was the result.

Now I must say this is no tack driver, nor is it a long range rifle, and I bought it with that expectation. Ballistics data using a 140 grain bullet show that it has a drop of -.2 inches at 100 yards and -5 inches at 150 yards.  So 100 yards is probably the edge of its optimum range. Mine seems to shoot high, but I still would not go beyond 100 yards.  That is fine to me since where I traditionally hunt it is thick woods and there is rarely any continuous ground more than 75 yards. With a scope you could probably get much better range and accuracy out of it. I imagine that if I was using much better quality ammunition with hotter loads, say +P or buffalo bore ammunition, the groupings would tighten considerably at 100 yards and the adjustable sites will be much more useful.  I shall try that some time in the future and post the results.

My final comments on the Henry Big Boy had to do with its quality. Originally I wanted to buy a Rossi Circuit Judge in .410/.45 long colt, most because of the allure of a revolving rifle.  However, I had seen many complaints about the quality of it and manufacturing flaws. Plus it carried the Taurus name (Rossi is owned by Taurus), a Brazilian company which has a reputation for iffy quality control.  So I decided to ditch the Circuit Judge. I also looked at the Ross M1892 lever action rifle, also in .357/38 and also made by Taurus.  It was $300 cheaper (the Henry cost $730), but when I saw it in person I was not impressed.  The metal work was OK, as was the metal finish, done satisfactorily but nothing thrilling.  However the wood and wood finish looked bad, as if it had been done by either child labor, a drunk, or someone who just didn’t really care about what they were doing.  It was really off putting.  The Henry looks like a rifle of unparalleled quality at first glance. It looks like someone made them with an eye for detail and with uncompromising quality in mind. I also own a Henry lever action in .22LR as well, although with a steel frame, and I can say the same for it.  When the sales person took it out of the box I immediately blurted “holy shit, that’s a beautiful rifIe.” I can’t stress the quality of workmanship that goes into Henry rifles, they are more than just firearms, they are works of art.  They are the only metallic cartridge firearms I own and I have no plans nor feel the need to buy any other modern firearms again. Instead I want to focus my collection on antique muzzleloaders or replicas of antique muzzleloaders.  So for me the quality of the Henry trumps all else, its a rifle you can own for a lifetime and can be passed down from generation to generation.

4

Dreyse sporting gun

Manufactured by Franz von Dreyse in Sömmerda, Germany c.1870. Serial number 9728.
11,5mm paper cartridge, needlefire break/Dreyse action rifle.

The son of famous German inventer Nikolaus von Dreyse, inventor of the Dreyse needle gun and possibly the bolt action altogether, Franz made up to his father’s legacy by building the classiest firearms of the late 19th century.