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Anonymous said:

A man in a magical place who get really uncomfortable when he realizes his spoon is alive

nope

Liam Payne Explains His Phobia Of... Spoons
  • Liam Payne Explains His Phobia Of... Spoons
  • Capital FM
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LISTEN: One Direction’s Liam Payne Gets Honest… About His Phobia Of Spoons!

4th June 2015, 09:26

The ‘Best Song Ever’ star gives us the inside scoop on one of the BIGGEST rumours, about his secret phobia!

It’s not your average phobia - having an aversion to spoons - but Liam Payne has explained his reasoning for disliking the little cutlery devils and we have to admits… it does kind of make sense!

The One Direction star stopped by for a chat with us ahead of the band’s performance at our Summertime Ball 2015 With Vodafone this Saturday (6th June), and was quizzed on rumours that have been flying around for some time that he is scared of spoons. It turns out the truth is more complicated!

“See I’m not so much scared of spoons, I’ll hold one,” Liam explained to Capital’s Dave Berry and Lisa Snowdon this week. “But I don’t like eating with them, if they’re not my spoons, if that makes sense.

“It is a bit weird. When I was a kid I was a bit naughty at school and when you were naughty they made you do the washing up,” Liam added. “I had to wash all these nasty spoons and then it’s just stuck with me after. I don’t know what people are doing with their spoons, I don’t want to know!”

x

ischemgeek.wordpress.com
Respect the "can't"
People with disabilities and chronic illnesses will often say we “can’t” do something when technically, we can, but not without severe consequences we’re not willing to pay. Since, in my experience...

“People with disabilities and chronic illnesses will often say we “can’t” do something when technically, we can, but not without severe consequences we’re not willing to pay. Since, in my experience as a person with chronic illness and disabilities, explaining that yes in theory I could do the thing but the cost-benefit analysis does not work out for me usually results in people trying to pressure me to do the thing despite me just explaining what it would cost, I try to shut down that line of pressure by saying “can’t” instead of “shouldn’t.”Doing this is not dishonest. I can’t do the thing, in the sense that abled people are thinking of. I can’t just pound it out and move on to the next thing. It will take too much out of me. If I do it, my day is basically over, and maybe my next few days or weeks will be wasted in recovery.But, abled people, when they find out what I meant by the “can’t” get outraged at it, and seem to think I’m lying about my abilities. And then my can’t backfires, because they take every can’t as a “shouldn’t.” -Ischemgeek

It’s sad how your life changes when you develop a chronic illness. Like how all your list of excuses why you can’t do something, starts with, “I’d have to take a shower…”

SHOWERING IS SO HARD.

And you can forget shaving my legs. At this point, I look like a gorilla… and give no fucks. Why? Because fucks cost spoons. Spoons I ain’t got.