spn: the hunger games

8

List of Favourite OTP’s; (3⁄4) Literature couples ≡ peeta & katniss (the hunger games)

You’re a painter. You’re a baker. You like to sleep with the windows open. You never take sugar in your tea. And you always double-knot your shoelaces. What I need to survive is not Gale’s fire, kindled with rage and hatred. I have plenty of fire myself. What I need is the dandelion in the spring. The bright yellow that means rebirth instead of destruction. The promise that life can go on, no matter how bad our losses. That it can be good again. And only Peeta can give me that. So after, when he whispers, “You love me. Real or not real?”
I tell him, “Real.”

  • Family: So, do you have a boyfriend?
  • Me: Yes, I have many.
  • Family: Many boyfriends?
  • Me: Yes.
  • Family: And they don't know that you're cheating on them?
  • Me: Well, the thing is, they don't really know they're dating me.
  • Family: ...
  • Me: And some of them have other girlfriends.
  • Family: ...
  • Me: And most of them are dead...
  • Family: ...
  • Me: And a bunch of people keep telling me that they're fictional characters but they're just jealous.
  • Family: ...
  • Me: ...
  • Family: *slowly backs away*

When an author kills off my favorite character

Every time I reread the Hunger Games trilogy I become more furious about the movie representation.

These books were about an indigenous woman (with a brain injury in book 3) living in poverty overthrowing a corrupt white government.

She was demisexual, had stomach hair, was not even remotely romantically driven (and canonically didn’t even find romance until after she had finished a revolution.)

And Peeta was disabled and physically abused as a child and they both suffered from mental health problems and the parallel between the Capitol and the ruling rich was so very transparent.

And I’m seeing fun coloured makeup in stores labeled “Capitol colours from the Hunger Games”!

These books were about the revolution of the most oppressed taking over the extravagance and elitism and decadence of the ruling class while citizens starved.

These books were a parallel to our current social dynamics, they were a call to arms. They were a battle cry for the impeding ruin of the rich white ruling class.

And the movies portrayed them as a fantasy, a romance story, a cute little tale. When the real story in the books was one of strength and upheaval and shifting paradigms and revolutions.