sphere concord

lana’s video for Love actually made me tear up at the point where the camera zooms in on her eye and we can see the glittering cosmos reflected back at us. this video might just be a cool aesthetic piece, or it might be the perfect conceptualisation of what it feels like to be “young and in love.” falling in love makes you believe in crazy things. logic is the monopoly of single people, who tell us that falling in love is an amalgam of coincidence and compatibility and social conditioning. everybody knows this - until you fall in love, of course. then the truth of the universe is unveiled to you. lovers emerge from the earthly dark into the loving glow of the sunlight. love transcends us far above the world; to a place where time ceases to exist, and the only gravitational pull is the infinite string between two beating hearts. suddenly, you see that every event in your life has been a stepping stone leading you to this person. all those whims and free choices, were actually the intricate weaving of the stars. and now that you have found this person, the soul that was born of the same stuff yours was, it feels like all the planets are aligned; the music of the spheres rings in concordant harmony; and your place in the universe is no mistake - all this time, you were made with intention. and with that realisation, comes the recognition of divinity. from thereon, every mundane moment - going down to the coffee shop, playing video games - is celestial. you navigate through the universe with new eyes, filled with awe and reverence. it might be a senseless theory, but it doesn’t matter that all of this is beyond human comprehension. it doesn’t matter that the people who manage to hold onto their sanity tell us we’re crazy. as lana puts it, so perfectly simple, it’s enough to be young and in love.

Let’s talk about Foreign Card Types


I’ve played a lot of Collectible Card Games over the years. Some I’ve only poked at, some I’ve played seriously, and some have consumed my life and warped my very being around them. Many of them have taken lessons from Magic, some more obviously than others, and many of them are off in their own direction. While each card game has its own unique traits, and I’m certainly not going to get into deep pros and cons, one thing that guides gameplay in different directions even among similar rulesets is card types. In Magic, we have eight vintage legal card types (one of which does nothing and two sets of which are mechanically very similar), and six card types for supplemental products.

Today, I’m going to take some time to look at some card types from other games I’ve played that are either unused or underused in Magic: the Gathering and talk about how they might be successfully implemented. We’ll get right into it after the break.

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