spectrum of our lies

Opinion On A Danny Phantom Come Back

Since some people in this crazy Phandom are getting hyped over practically nothing on the Danny Phantom Amino, I feel obligated to give my own two cents on this once again.


I don’t want any sort of comeback in the current cartoon climate. The climate is too heated up for Danny Phantom to slide in smoothly, whether it be continuation that ignores The-Episode-That-Doesn’t-Exist or reboot.


I’m scared, terrified even, of what might happen to discourage any new potential Phans, or give them the wrong idea of what we’ve been doing this past decade deprived from content.


I’m scared of dedicated contributors to this Phandom who help keep this place alive, suddenly leaving because of the sour taste left in their mouths of what they saw.


We’re a Phandom divided on whether Vlad is an old man who wants a family or is an unforgivable villain in our story. Our self-produced content lies on the spectrum of hardcore angst to the power of infinity, to the most crack-filled goofiness of analyzing whether Danny is a spork. This is a Phandom that actively ignores what is canon, making UAs instead of AUs (albeit, we have plenty of those too) and is not only fine with it, but actively encourages it. Stuck between whether Amethyst Ocean is the best thing in the world, to the ship that fails chemistry class. Heavily blurred lines between the worlds of canon and fanon from our fanfic works. With a majority actively voicing a loathe for the finale that is one of Elmer’s favorite episodes.


This isn’t something authority figures just resurrect with a wish from Desiree. The ghost Desiree looks at the wish, and then twists it into the most destructive and havoc-wrecking thing possible.


The community we’ve built, its basic foundation may lie on the most comedic cartoon of its time, and while we do pull the occasional pun, we’re mostly a mature Phandom with mad ideas to keep us alive. We’ve went off to create some things from the outside look extremely maddening (and I obviously don’t approve it all, but it still nonetheless exists). Pompous Pep, Pitch Pearl, Haunted Past, etc…


The Phandom as a whole has made the Elmer Danny Phantom universe full of superhero themes with a little monsters from another dimension touch, into something drastically different. With all due respect, I’m not sure which one at this point is better suited to be in the show if it ever comes back.


From what I’ve gathered, most of the more active Phans are with me in that they were more interested in the characters of Danny Phantom and treated the superhero gig as an afterthought when canonically speaking. Phandom speaking, we’re torn between constant fluff and constant angst. (If you couldn’t tell, I’m on the fluff side.)


We need something that challenges us, but with good reason and rational thought in a come back. Something that would be accepted, but not exactly what we asked, because what we normally ask for are for impossible things as a Phandom that thrives off of pure randomness.


The problem is, that’s a difficult task to do.

Why are some people drawn to minimalist architecture and others to Baroque? Why are some people excited by bare concrete walls and others by William Morris’s floral patterns? Our tastes will depend on what spectrum of our emotional make-up lies in shadow and is hence in need of stimulation and emphasis. Every work of art is imbued with a particular psychological and moral atmosphere: a painting may be either serene or restless, courageous or careful, modest or confident, masculine or feminine, bourgeois or aristocratic, and our preferences for one kind over another reflect our varied psychological gaps. We hunger for artworks that will compensate for our inner fragilities and help return us to a viable mean. We call a work beautiful when it supplies the virtues we are missing, and we dismiss as ugly one that forces on us moods or motifs that we feel either threatened or already overwhelmed by. Art holds out the promise of inner wholeness.
—   Alain de Botton & John Armstrong, from Art as Therapy (Phaidon 2013)