spd*

Auditory Processing Problems

• *someone says something* “what?” *repeats themselves* “sorry?” *repeats themselves again* “pardon?”

•"hey, y'see the red thing at the top of the shelf, will you get it?“ "Sorry, what?” “On the sh-” “oh yeah sure, I’ll get it.”

•*doesn’t hear teacher because someone’s pen is making a scratchy sound at the back of the room*

•*replays video 10 ten times to figure out what they’re saying*

•teachers asking, “why do you always stop writing in the middle of a sentence, just write down whatever I’m saying,” followed by the response, “I’m just processing it,” rebuked by, “we’ll stop processing it and just write.”

•*gets really focused on staring out the window and goes through four songs without hearing a single on*

9

I just want to know why “shoot to kill” is always the first option when it comes to us??? Pepper spray….tasers…..bean bag bullets…..so many options available to the police, but it is always lethal option as a first choice, especially if you happen to be brown or black. 

The kid who killed nine people in SC was apprehended safely…even took him to Burger King. The bath salt psycho who was caught by police in the middle of EATING SOMEONE’S FACE…he was apprehended safely! Why do we always have to die?

Undercover Cops/Warning for Drug Blogs 6/13/17

Hey everyone sorry for not posting on here for the last week, I’ve been laying low after a frightening incident that happened to me regarding undercover police and someone I met here off Tumblr. Yes, police are targeting people (drug users primarily) on here by making blogs that have nothing on them (no reblogs, no personal content, not following any other blogs but Tumblr Staff and YOU) and messaging drug addicts in private telling them that if we help them score they will give us money/let us keep like half the amount of stuff they’re asking for, etc.

I was debating on whether or not I should post this since the person this is about doesn’t know I know they’re a cop/working for cops, but I want to keep everyone on here safe from this kind of stuff happening to them, so I might as well share my experience.

Basically a blog on here that had nothing posted on their blog and that wasn’t following anyone except for me and Tumblr Staff (two key sketchy signs right there) messaged me asking for help getting H saying that they had just moved from out of state and needed help with a new connect and offered me close to $100 each time for helping them. It seemed sketchy but I desperately needed the money, so I decided to help.

I met with them twice before the third time, being extremely cautious the first two times (watching my surroundings, asking important questions, sending someone else to bring the stuff back to them instead of me, etc.). Then on the third time they asked for a much larger amount than they had asked for the first two times (which is something cops trying to do an undercover buy do, they buy a couple of decent sized amounts and then on buy number three they buy a large amount and try to pop you with it when you return back to them with it.)


On buy three I carefully watched my surroundings. I noticed undercover cop cars around keeping an eye on me, after I walked off I had a bad feeling.

I got a confirmation that my sketched out feelings were right when while the person was waiting on me to come back with dope my friend that knew what I was doing gave me a call and told me that they were over in the area that that person I’m helping is in and that there’s over 5 cop cars and a drug task force vehicle waiting on me to come back so they could bust me. There was also unmarked vehicles with cops looking out the window with binoculars driving up and down the streets looking for where I went. I’m not going to say what happened after this in case the person I wrote this about finds it. I did the smart thing and decided to be safe instead of sorry.

Everyone on Nodsquad, Tweaker Nation, and everything in between, BE CAREFUL WHEN IT COMES TO MEETING PEOPLE ONLINE AND HELPING THEM GET VARIOUS SUBSTANCES! IT CAN AND POSSIBLY COULD COME BACK TO BITE YOU.

I’ve met probably close to 20 people off of Tumblr, some just to hang out, some for whatever else, and none of them were sketchy people until this last incident.

DON’T HELP BLOGS THAT ARE NEW AND DON’T HAVE ANY CONTENT ON THEM! (aka no reblogs, no personal content, only following you and Tumblr staff or a very unusually small handful of people.)

DON’T GIVE OUT YOUR REAL NAME, REAL PHONE NUMBER, OR ANY OTHER PERSONAL INFORMATION ABOUT YOURSELF TO THESE PEOPLE OR ANYONE ONLINE YOU DON’T REALLY KNOW.

If it seems too good to be true, it probably is.

If anyone has anymore questions about avoiding these types of situations, about signs and tips on how to spot an undercover cop, or anything else feel free to message me privately. The area I’m in recently hired 110 more undercovers to do drug busts right now, I’m sure Seattle isn’t the only place with this sort of thing going on right now.

PLEASE, PLEASE BE SAFE EVERYONE. A get well, a high, or a chunk of cash isn’t worth a felony and your freedom.

Please reblog this message so everyone in the drug community on here can see this and be made aware. Tumblr isn’t always a “safe place” like we would like to think it is.
Explaining sensory overload and hypersensitivity to neurotypicals

so in a discord im in, me and @kuonabnaq started explaining hypersensitivity and sensory overload in terms people who dont experience them will understand and i thought they’d be useful to people! i’ve seen sensory overload and hypersensitivity explained decently, but never in ways people who don’t experience them will understand well so here’s some ways!

Sound

yknow that feeling you get from nails on a chalkboard? every sound does that

or yknow that feeling you get from nails on a chalkboard? every sound i cant control does that (since sometimes music helps - its a controllable sound)

Vision

“when you come out of a movie theater and the sun just pokes your eyes” - that, with every colour in my vision field

or the light at the dentist which goes right into your eyes, but with all light (including lights, colors, etc..)

Touch

when you forget that the sand on the beach is painfully hot and stand for a second too long, but with all contact

or when you get a bad grape but with everything

Smell

smell is when you walk past someone with a ton of perfume/cologne but for everything

or one of those really weird acids you have in chemistry, you know? Those that just shoot right up to the back of your head when you make the mistake of smelling it directly.

or walking into a lush/bath and body works/other similar store, but always 
(first and third are especially good if you want to highlight the ‘even good smells are bad smells’ thing)

when neurotypicals reblog a personality disorder post just because it’s Relatable

Masterpost: Sensory differences

If you know a bit about autism, or have been following this blog for some time, you must be aware that one of the autistic traits which has the most consequences on our daily lives is our sensory differences. They have an impact on all spheres of our lives: on what we can and cannot do, on where we can and cannot go, on what we can eat, wear, listen to, on our ways to feel good and on what makes us feel bad.

Such a wide subject definitely warrants a masterpost. So, here we go!

First, let’s take a look at the human sensory system, to understand the different areas in which there can be differences. It’s actually more complicated than the traditional five senses! Our sensory system is divided into three parts:

  • Exteroception : sensing what comes from the environment outside your body.
  • Interoception : sensing the internal physiological condition of your body
  • Proprioception : sensing the position your limbs and body are in

These three main areas encompass different senses (note that this is one model and others exist):

  • Exteroception: sight, hearing, smell, taste, touch, but also thermoception (sensation of heat/cold) and nociception (sensation of pain)
  • Interoception: nociception (internal pain), feelings of hunger, lack of oxygen, thirst, need to pee, as well as monitoring of the respiratory rate and heart rate.
  • Proprioception: the kinesthetic sense (knowledge of the movement and relative positions of your body parts) and the vestibular sense (knowledge of body movement, direction and acceleration)


For all of these senses, autistic people can have them work typically, be hyposensitive (less sensitive than most people), be hypersensitive (more sensitive than most people) or have sensory processing differences which do not fall under the hypo/hyper system.

The clinical term which encompasses these differences is “Sensory Processing Disorder”. One can have SPD without being autistic, but all or almost all autistic people have SPD.

It should be noted, however, that some autistic people don’t like to think of it as a disorder and prefer simply talking about sensory processing differences.

Something very important to understand is that hypersensitivity and hyposensitivity CAN coexist in any one person’s sensory system. For example, they might be hypersensitive to smell and hyposensitive to touch. They can also be hyper/hypo sensitive to only one aspect of one sense (for instance, pressure or texture or bright lights or sweet tastes). They can also be sometimes hyposensitive to something, and sometimes hypersensitive to it.

Being hypersensitive to a stimulus and being exposed to it can cause what is called “sensory overload”, which usually translates to pain, discomfort, and impaired cognitive functions (in other words, trouble thinking properly). If pushed further (very intense stimuli or very long exposition), it can lead to a shutdown or meltdown.

Being hyposensitive to something and lacking stimulation can translate to restlessness, discomfort, and even pain, as well as an intense craving for the stimuli.


Here are some examples of what hypersensitivity to different senses can translate to, on a behavioral and subjective level:

  • Sight: The person wears sunglasses, maybe even indoors. They avoid places with fluorescent lightning, blinking lightning or too bright lightning. They dislike looking at brightly colored surfaces. They may have trouble with visually cluttered spaces, such as crowds and supermarkets. They may find any kind of flickering or movement around them painful to see.

  • Hearing: They may hear sounds no one else can hear (and some have been tested to hear outside the normal human range). They may have to wear headphones/ear defenders in noisy places. They may avoid crowds and events with lots of people/loud music/shouting. They may have difficulty with the noise of the vacuum, of the construction work on the other side of the street, of the clock ticking in the next room. They may develop tinnitus eventually.

  • Smell: They’ll probably dislike places with strong smells such as perfume shops, farms, or crowded public transportation. They may need to wash themselves, their clothes and their sheet very often to keep body odors to a minimum. They may not tolerate scented soap, shampoo or deodorant (and it’s sometimes difficult to find an unscented one!). They may struggle with the smell of food in general, or with particular smells.

  • Taste: They may be very picky eaters, only tolerating a couple of very bland-tasting food such as mashed potatoes or pasta. They may have difficulty having diverse enough diets with all the nutrients they need. They may always eat the exact same thing.

  • Touch: They may have trouble finding clothing with a texture that they can tolerate. They may need to cut all the tags off their clothing. They may absolutely hate anyone touching them. They may be ok with firm touch, but find light brushy touches painful. They may have trouble wearing specific items of clothing, such as socks/shoes, headphones or hats. They may hate people touching their hair, or find brushing their hair very difficult. They may find brushing their teeth nearly impossible because of the scratching sensation. They may have trouble with the texture of many foods, and be a picky eater because of that.

  • Thermoception: They may be very sensitive to cold, and always wearing loads of clothing and turning the heating up even when other people don’t think it’s that cold. They may be very sensitive to heat, finding summer very hard to cope with, especially if they don’t have access to AC. They may be hyper-aware of tiny changes in temperature, feeling cold when it is dropping and hot when it is rising regardless of the actual temperature.

  • Nociception: They may be more sensitive to pain than most people, and find very painful what most people would shrug off. (They’re not being a drama queen! They really do feel more pain!)

  • Vestibular sense: They may get motion sickness very easily.


And here are some examples for hyposensitivity:

  • Sight: The person may have trouble finding things in visually crowded environments. They may enjoy looking at bright colored lights or at objects in motion (spinning top/twirling fingers…)

  • Hearing: They may not notice being called or being talked to, especially when focused. They may enjoy listening to very loud music, singing, or making lots of noises.

  • Smell: They may not notice smells which other people do. They may enjoy strong smells such as perfume, essential oils or body odor. They may enjoy sniffing a favorite blanket, a significant other, a pet, or anything they like.

  • Taste: They may be able to ingest an impressive amount of spicy food, and may crave strong tasting food (pepper, lemon, salt, sugar…).

  • Touch: They may love rubbing/touching favorite textures, rubbing their hands together… They may love and crave deep pressure, such as having heavy weights on top of them.

  • Thermoception: They may be outside in winter with just a T-shirt, or not be bothered by the heat in summer and even wear a sweater. They may enjoy touching very hot things such as radiators or very hot water, or very cold things like ice cubes or snow.

  • Nociception: They may be less sensitive to pain than most people and not notice it when they’ve been hurt.

  • Vestibular sense: They may love roller coasters, boat rides when there’s a lot of waves… They may never get motion sickness of any sort. They may spend time rocking or like to chill upside down.

  • Kinesthetic sense: They may be very clumsy since they have a poor sense of the position of their body in space. They may stumble a lot and be generally bad at sports. They may have trouble with fine motor skills such as handwriting or sewing. They may enjoy doing repetitive motions such as hand flapping.

  • Interoception: They may have trouble noticing  when they are hungry, thirsty, tired, or when they need to go to the bathroom. They may need to set alarms or to have self-care at set times as part of their routine.


These are of course only examples and hyper or hyposensitivity can express themselves in as many ways are there are people who experience them.

Here are some examples of other sensory differences autistic people can experience:

  • Synesthesia seems more frequent among autistic people than in the general population. It is defined as a transfer from one sensory modality to another: for example, seeing sounds or hearing tastes. It can also mean associating colors or personalities to numbers/letters. In autistic people specifically, it can be a very positive thing (you can now stim with two senses at the same time!) or something painful (these bright lights are awful, well now they’re harsh noises too).

  • We often struggle with processing sensory information, especially speech, which can mean we can have a lot of trouble understanding what people say, might take a lot of time to process speech (which results in conversations such as” “Hey, will you get me this thing please?” “What?” “I said, will-” “Oh yeah, sure”), and might need subtitles to be able to understand movies. Processing information from two different senses at a time can also be difficult, which often translates as “I can either look at the images or understand what’s being said”. This is one of the causes of our struggle with eye contact.

That’s all for today. We hope this helped. We are currently preparing a masterpost on stimming which will be quite related to this one. Happy writing!

i’m taking pre-orders for my spd/autism noise muffling beanies/headbands

YO I am so autistic and SO PUMPED that I came up with this product. earbuds and noise cancelling headphones are sensory hell for me, but I have finally figured out how to use only fabric to block out between 50% of sound. but if you order custom, I can adjust the amount of fabric to allow the amount of sound in you want.

the beanies and headbands are made of recycled sweaters!!!

i’ll start making them march 11th and i can have them shipped by march 12th seriously im hyperfocused

plain beanies are $15. plain headbands are $10. beanies with designs are $20. headbands with designs are $13. shipping is free because GREECE but it will also take about a month to get there because GREECE

you can pre-order a plain one, a space themed one, a plant themed one, or an animal themed one (my special interests lol)

OR you can custom order one in your special interest! i’m already making one for someone who really likes monsters and it’s going to have horns and lots of eyes so basically tell me what you’re interested in. custom beanies are $25 and custom headbands are $17. i can also change the fabric or add zippers or snaps or tassles or fringes. really just let your sensory desires run wild my buds

in conclusion i am SO FREAKING HAPPY. i see so many products for autistic people made by allistic people and it’s like??? no. i’m autistic and can’t hold down a job because of my anxiety disorder, so this is my only source of income. i’m also trying to save up money to buy a retired greyhound that is dying so i can give them a good home

etsy shop will be up tomorrow. PLEASE message me with what you want and i will mesage you because i’ll probably have made it in 1-3 days

please sign boost for autistic/spd people who shouldn’t have to deal with uncomfortable and unstylish ear protection!!!

Okay so just a little heads up:

If you work in retail, or somewhere else that require costumer service, please do not think that customers are being rude if they do not answer you.

That customer may have anxiety, selective mutism, or be autistic. They might not be able to talk or they may be too afraid to make small talk.

So please don’t call us assholes, shitheads, or bitches because we can’t make small talk at the counter. It’s probably not our fault.

spd tony stark who can’t focus with the visual stimulus of pepper’s desk toy, who invents a spectacular holographic display to avoid the textures/sounds of paper & pencil, who wears sunglasses every time he has to face the media + the flashes of their cameras, who blasts music in his workshop to drown out any grating machinery noises, who stims by fidgeting and tapping at the arc reactor, who wears the most worn out t-shirts when he’s alone because they’re soft and who wears the most expensive suits when he must because they’re the most comfortable when they’re custom-made, who spent years self medicating with alcohol to dull his senses and having a ton of sex to drown his nerves in positive feedback