spanish-harlem

When I search the OINTB tag on here you know who the fuck I barely see. The absolute Queen that is GLORIA MENDOZA. I mean she is the head matriarch of Spanish Harlem. She looks out for not only her girls but the entire prison. This woman COOKED DINNER FOR THE INMATES IN THE MIDDLE OF A RIOT. SHE FED THEM.BECAUSE TO HER , EVERYONE IN THERE IS FAMILY. She took on the role of mother to “woe is me Daya”.She stole the gun to keep daya out of further trouble and even felt guilty for daya’s dumbass decisions. She deadass risked her life to free those guards for her child and she struggled with the decision. Can you imagine?!? RESPECT THE QUEEN THAT IS GLORIA MENDOZA.

Originally posted by litchfieldprisonblues-blog

How A Few Crafty Harlemites Are Fighting Back Against Gentrification

After Harlem resident Pipi Birdwater had her lawsuit against the borough of Manhattan thrown out, many New Yorkers began to wonder how many shared her ire towards lifelong Harlem residents for “intentional cruelty,” as her suit stated.

Birdwater claims that New York residents purposely gave her wrong directions, led her towards areas of Harlem that didn’t exist, and feigned ignorance when she referenced areas of Harlem by their hip new colloquialisms. Borough president Gale Arnot Brewer called her claims that they cost her her $100,000 job (due to frequent tardiness) “farcical.” But after walking through Harlem’s Marcus Garvey Park and talking to Harlemites, they have merit.

38-year-old Dominique Sampson recalls, “this cracker asked me the other day where RuPa is. I knew he was talking about Rucker Park, but we don’t call it no damn RuPa. Who ‘bout to be sayin, 'remember when Kobe and AI came in RuPa?’,” he says as family and friends double over in laughter in their beach chairs.

“So I said 'probably down in the village getting life.’ He comes back to me that night all red ready to fight sayin’ he wasted his day, I said 'I thought you meant Rupaul!”

Sampson says his neighbor was not amused. In his anger, he joins a growing group of new Harlem residents who feel they’re being deceived out of resentment.

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In the past few years, getrification has taken away the unique and special beauty of many of the neighborhoods that i belong to in New York City. 

I grew up in east harlem, right on 110th street and 5th avenue. It is my home, my barrio, my place of comfort. In recent walks around the neighborhood, i sadly mourned a many of the original shops and business that were local to our area. Beautiful graffiti, and entire murals, painted over for the comfort of our urban colonizers. The celia cruz throw up on lexington? Gone. 

So i thought it was especially important to start photographing the novelty and unique flavor that it so well known for. To capture what is still there, in the midst of unwanted change. To show the world, a wonderful landscape of old new york i will never forget. 

Various Photos All Taken in East Harlem, By Destiny Frasqueri 2015

concept: its 1995 and me and my bf benicio del toro are sharing Chinese takeout in our shitty spanish harlem apartment n he kisses me when he leaves to buy a pack of cigarettes from the bodega down the block 

Happy Birthday, Tito Puente!

Ernesto Antonio “Tito” Puente, (April 20, 1923 – June 1, 2000),[1] was an American salsa musician and Latin jazz composer. The son of native Puerto Ricans, Ernest and Ercilia Puente, living in New York City's Spanish Harlem community, Puente is often credited as “The Musical Pope,” “El Rey de los Timbales” (The King of the timbales) and “The King of Latin Music.” He is best known for dance-oriented mambo and Latin jazz compositions that helped keep his career going for 50 years. He and his music appear in many films such as The Mambo Kings and Fernando Trueba‘s Calle 54. He guest-starred on several television shows including Sesame StreetThe Cosby Showand, most notably, The Simpsons two-part episode “Who Shot Mr. Burns?”.

Tito Puente was born on April 20, 1923, at Harlem Hospital Center in New York City. His family moved frequently, but he spent the majority of his childhood in the Spanish Harlem area of the city. Puente’s father was the foreman at a razorblade factory.

As a child, he was described as hyperactive, and after neighbors complained of hearing seven-year-old Puente beating on pots and window frames, his mother sent him to 25 cent piano lessons. By the age of 10, he switched to percussion, drawing influence from jazz drummer Gene Krupa. He later created a song-and-dance duo with his sister Anna in the 1930s and intended to become a dancer, but an ankle tendon injury prevented him pursuing dance as a career. When the drummer in Machito’s band was drafted to the army, Puente subsequently took his place.

Tito Puente Sr. served in the Navy for three years during World War II after being drafted in 1942. He was discharged with a Presidential Unit Citation for serving in nine battles on the escort carrier USS Santee (CVE-29). The GI Bill allowed him to study music at Juilliard School of Music, where he completed a formal education in conducting, orchestration and theory. In 1969, he received the key to the City of New York from former Mayor John Lindsay. In 1992, he was inducted into the National Congressional Record, and in 1993 he received the James Smithson Bicentennial Medal from the Smithsonian.[5]

During the 1950s, Puente was at the height of his popularity, and helped to bring Afro-Cuban and Caribbean sounds, like mamboson, and cha-cha-cha, to mainstream audiences. Puente was so successful playing popular Afro-Cuban rhythms that many people mistakenly identify him as Cuban. Dance Mania, possibly Puente’s most well known album was released in 1958.[6] Later, he moved into more diverse sounds, including pop music, bossa nova and others, eventually settling down with a fusion of Afro-Cuban and Latin jazz genres that became known as “salsa” (a term that he disliked). In 1979, Puente won the first of five Grammy Awards for the albums A Tribute to Benny MoréOn BroadwayMambo Diablo, and Goza Mi Timbal. In 1990, Puente was awarded the James Smithson Bicentennial Medal. He was also awarded a Grammy at the first Latin Grammy Awards, winning Best Traditional Tropical Album for Mambo Birdland. In 1995, he appeared as himself on the Simpsons episode “Who Shot Mr. Burns?” In early 2000, he shot the music documentaryCalle 54, wearing an all-white outfit with his band.[7] After a show in Puerto Rico on May 31, he suffered a massive heart attack and was flown to New York City for surgery to repair aheart valve, but complications developed and he died during the night of May 31 – June 1, 2000.[8] He was posthumously awarded the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2003.

Tito Puente’s name is often mentioned in a television production called La Epoca,[9] a film about the Palladium era in New York, Afro-Cuban music and rhythms, Mambo and Salsa as dances and music and much more. The film discusses many of Tito Puente’s as well as Arsenio Rodríguez’s contributions, and features interviews with some of the musicians Puente recorded with such as Alfonso “El Panameno” Joseph, Luis Mangual, Julian Lianos and others.

Puente’s youngest son, Tito Puente, Jr., has continued his father’s legacy by presenting many of the same songs in his performances and recordings, while daughter Audrey Puenteis a television meteorologist for WNYW and WWOR-TV in New York City. Puente’s granddaughter, Janeen Puente, is a singer and bandleader. Her band is known as the Janeen Puente Orchestra.