spacewar!

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Kyle Owen had not just one but TWO PDP-8′s on display!

His PDP-8/E was hooked into a Teleray terminal, and a very powerfully fast paper tape reader.  Sadly, I don’t remember what it was that he was running on here.  But I do know that he had a small transistor radio that he was attempting to play tunes on via some hacking on the PDP-8/E.

His PDP-8/M was hooked into an oscilloscope and a pair of controllers so that he could demonstrate Spacewar! but when I stopped by it was showing off some pretty graphics.  I believe that this machine was to be booted off of a Raspberry Pi standing in for a proper hard drive or paper tape source.

However, his whole setup wasn’t hooked up for very long, and had to be powered off due to electrical grid concerns.  And I really wanted to play Spacewar!

Spacewar!

“Dan Edwards (left) and Peter Samson playing Spacewar! on the PDP-1 Type 30 display.”

circa 1962.

There is a lot of discussion about what counts as the first video game. Some say Spacewar! (programmed by Steve Russell) is the first. Others claim it is the second. Some do not even put it in the first five games ever made. It is really hard to define them based on what we now know as video games. One thing is clear however, Spacewar! is a shmup and It is the very first one (featuring commendable Newtonian Physics at that).

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“The museum’s bottom level, located in the planet core, was a spherical room containing a shrine to the very first videogame, Tennis for Two, invented by William Higinbotham in 1958. The game ran on an ancient analog computer and was played on a tiny oscilloscope screen about five inches in diameter. Next to it was a replica of an ancient PDP-1 computer running a copy of Spacewar!, the second videogame ever made, created by a bunch of students at MIT in 1962.”

A list of every video game ever made: 43,806 names, and counting

It’s 43,806 names long, and it’s not even close to being finished.

It’s a project to name every single video game, ever made, for every platform. Pastebin user Data_Baser is leading the project, with help from 4chan's /vr/ retro games board. And it aims to be comprehensive, including not just arcade, console or PC releases, but video games made for mobile platforms, browser-based games, and visual novels.

So far, the oldest entries are for Computer Space and Galaxy Game (pictured), both class of 1971. Early examples of video games, such as Spacewar! (developed in 1962 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology) or Tennis for Two (1958, at Brookhaven National Laboratory) are not in the roll call.

(Link to the full story)

Duel Analog: SpaceWar! vs. Angry Birds

Colin’s new column over on Motherboard inspired by our very own post on Assassin’s Creed vs. Sonic the Hedgehog a few weeks back. Duel Analog compares two seemingly disparate videogames, showing their differences and often radical similarities, spanning the entire history of gaming.

This week we talk about evolution vs. revolution with Spacewar! vs. Angry Birds. Two games with surprising parallels, conveniently bookending videogame history today.
http://motherboard.vice.com/blog/duel-analog-spacewar-vs-angry-birds 

Stay tuned to Motherboard for more Duel Analog columns in 2013!

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D-Wave Lab Tour - The Infrastructure of the D-Wave Quantum Computer

Interesting & well shot short documentary about D-Wave’s main experimental facility and their high-tech quantum computer fridge systems and quantum computing infrastructures.

Side note: Geordie Rose, CTO of D-Wave, reveals in his blog that they have built a quantum computer version of Spacewar!:

They look a lot like computers did back in the 60s. There are a lot of parallels to back then — we even built our own version of Spacewar! — except you get to play against a quantum computer. (Aside: this game — which was the world’s first quantum computer game — was called MaxCat. I own the only handwritten copy of the rules…. one of my most treasured artifacts!)

Part two is about the fridge at the cooling system, and the electronics that are used to talk to the quantum chip:

And part three looking at the quantum annealing processor:

[more] [via Geordie Rose]

anyway delete your system 32 folder guys its actually bloatware installed by Big PC to track ur keystrokes and sell u ads after i deleted mine i could play call of duty modern spacewar on ultra settings with no problem and my download speeds jumped to 60mb/second