space-image

A stellar fingerprint

Showcased at the centre of this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image is an emission-line star known as IRAS 12196-6300.

Located just under 2300 light-years from Earth, this star displays prominent emission lines, meaning that the star’s light, dispersed into a spectrum, shows up as a rainbow of colours marked with a characteristic pattern of dark and bright lines. The characteristics of these lines, when compared to the “fingerprints” left by particular atoms and molecules, can be used to reveal IRAS 12196-6300’s chemical composition.

Under 10 million years old and not yet burning hydrogen at its core, unlike the Sun, this star is still in its infancy. Further evidence of IRAS 12196-6300’s youth is provided by the presence of reflection nebulae. These hazy clouds, pictured floating above and below IRAS 12196-6300, are created when light from a star reflects off a high concentration of nearby dust, such as the dusty material still remaining from IRAS 12196-6300’s formation.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA
Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt (Geckzilla)

Big, beautiful, barred spiral galaxy NGC 1300 lies some 70 million light-years away on the banks of the constellation Eridanus. This Hubble Space Telescope composite view of the gorgeous island universe is one of the largest Hubble images ever made of a complete galaxy. NGC 1300 spans over 100,000 light-years and the Hubble image reveals striking details of the galaxy’s dominant central bar and majestic spiral arms. In fact, on close inspection the nucleus of this classic barred spiral itself shows a remarkable region of spiral structure about 3,000 light-years across. Like other spiral galaxies, including our own Milky Way, NGC 1300 is thought to have a supermassive central black hole.

Object Names: NGC 1300

Image Type: Astronomical

Credit: Hubble HeritageTeam, NASA, ESA

Time And Space

3

Andromeda in Infrared

This image of the Andromeda galaxy in infrared is the sharpest image ever taken of the dust in another spiral galaxy when it was taken. This image reveals the delicate tracings of spiral arms that reach into the very center of the galaxy. The fiery plumes of red contain millions of stars trapped within the dust that creates them.

Credit: NASA/JPL/Spitzer

Follow @ piepieninja on twitter for quick space news!

NASA found ‘Morse code’ on Mars. A 2016 image revealed what appeared to be a series of dashes and dots that turned out to be sand dunes, but a planetary scientist deciphered the 'message’ anyway just for fun. It says 'NEE NED ZB 6TNN DEIBEDH SIEFI EBEEE SSIEI ESEE SEEE.’ Source Source 2

Originally posted by lookhuman

Originally posted by lachicadelmechonazul

2

Hubble finds ring of Dark Matter

Dark matter is the most common substance in the universe, scientists even estimate that it takes up approximately 25% of the entire universe. However, we can’t see it and we don’t even know what it is!

“Astronomers using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope got a first-hand view of how dark matter behaves during a titanic collision between two galaxy clusters. The wreck created a ripple of dark matter, which is somewhat similar to a ripple formed in a pond when a rock hits the water. “

This ring gives @nasa scientists and researchers strong evidence that dark matter exists. To read more visit: NASA

Credit: NASA / Hubble

NGC 6888, also known as the Crescent Nebula, is a cosmic bubble about 25 light-years across, blown by winds from its central, bright, massive star. This sharp telescopic portrait uses narrow band image data that isolates light from hydrogen and oxygen atoms in the wind-blown nebula. The oxygen atoms produce the blue-green hue that seems to enshroud the detailed folds and filaments. Visible within the nebula, NGC 6888’s central star is classified as a Wolf-Rayet star (WR 136). The star is shedding its outer envelope in a strong stellar wind, ejecting the equivalent of the Sun’s mass every 10,000 years. The nebula’s complex structures are likely the result of this strong wind interacting with material ejected in an earlier phase. Burning fuel at a prodigious rate and near the end of its stellar life this star should ultimately go out with a bang in a spectacular supernova explosion. Found in the nebula rich constellation Cygnus, NGC 6888 is about 5,000 light-years away.

Object Names: NGC 6888, The Crescent Nebula

Image Type: Astronomical

Credit: Michael Miller, Jimmy Walker

Time And Space

An Emission Nebula - NGC 6357

Far away in the constellation Scorpius, inside the core of the large emission nebula NGC 6357, lies the star cluster Pismis 24. Part of the nebula is ionised by the youngest stars in Pismis 24 - which are characterized by their blue light. The intense ultraviolet radiation from the blazing stars heats the gas surrounding the cluster and creates a bubble in NGC 6357. The presence of these surrounding gas clouds makes probing into the region even harder for Astronomers.

Credit: NASA/ESA/Hubble

The large stellar association cataloged as NGC 206 is nestled within the dusty arms of the neighboring Andromeda galaxy. Also known as M31, the spiral galaxy is a mere 2.5 million light-years away. NGC 206 is seen in this gorgeous close-up of the southwestern extent of Andromeda’s disk, a remarkable composite of data from space and ground-based observatories. The bright, blue stars of NGC 206 indicate its youth. In fact, its youngest massive stars are less than 10 million years old. Much larger than the open or galactic clusters of young stars in the disk of our Milky Way galaxy, NGC 206 spans about 4,000 light-years. That’s comparable in size to the giant stellar nurseries NGC 604 in nearby spiral M33 and the Tarantula Nebula, in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Star forming sites within Andromeda are revealed by the telltale reddish emission from clouds of ionized hydrogen gas.

Object Names: M31, NGC 206

Image Type: Astronomical

Credit: Subaru Telescope (NAOJ), Hubble Space Telescope, Local Group Galaxy Survey (Phil Massey PI), Mayall 4-Meter, Robert Gendler

Time And Spce

The Egg Nebula - CRL 2688

Around 3000 light-years from Earth in the constellation Cygnus is a planetary nebula known as the Egg Nebula. The nebula is the result of a dramatic phase in the life of a Sun-like star. Objects such as these occur as a dying star’s hot remains briefly illuminate the material it has expelled, lighting up the gas and dust surrounding it. The concentric rings seen in the less dense cloud surrounding the star are due to the star ejecting material at regular intervals. The ejection process typically orrurs every hundred years during a phase of the star’s evolution just prior to this preplanetary nebula phase. These dusty shells are not usually visible in these nebulas, but when they are it provides astronomers with a rare opportunity to study their formation and evolution.

Credit: NASA/ESA/Hubble